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Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Sperm Quality

Diabetes May Cut Male Fertility

Diabetes May Cut Male Fertility

Diabetes damages a man's sperm and may reduce fertility, say UK researchers. Tests showed DNA in sperm from diabetic men had more signs of damage than in men without the condition. Defective sperm DNA is one cause of male infertility, pregnancy failure and miscarriage but the implications for sperm affected by diabetes is unknown. Writing in Human Reproduction, the team said the findings were worrying given rapidly rising rates of diabetes and more research was needed. The study of 56 sperm samples is the first to compare the quality of DNA in sperm from men with and without diabetes. Around 52% of the DNA in the sperm cells was fragmented in diabetic men compared with 32% in men without the condition. The study also found a higher rate of deletions of DNA in the mitochondria - tiny, energy-generating compartments found within cells. Semen volume was significantly less in diabetic men, but there were no significant differences in sperm concentration, structure of the sperm or their ability to move. Although the men in the study had type 1 diabetes - where the body does not produce insulin - the researchers have found the same DNA damage in sperm from men with type 2 diabetes - a more common form where the body does not produce enough insulin or does not respond properly to it. Rising rates Diet and obesity are known to be key factors in the increase of type 2 diabetes, which normally starts in adulthood. But the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is usually diagnosed in childhood or adolescence, is also increasing by 3% a year in European children. Study author Dr Ishola Agbaje, a research fellow in the Reproductive Medicine Research Group at Queen's University, Belfast, said: "Diabetes will affect many more men prior to and during their reproductive years." He added t Continue reading >>

Insulin Dependant Diabetes Mellitus: Implications For Male Reproductive Function

Insulin Dependant Diabetes Mellitus: Implications For Male Reproductive Function

Insulin dependant diabetes mellitus: implications for male reproductive function Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Correspondence address. Tel: +44-28-9063-5060 ; Fax: Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Regional Centre for Endocrinology and Diabetes Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Human Reproduction, Volume 22, Issue 7, 1 July 2007, Pages 18711877, I.M. Agbaje, D.A. Rogers, C.M. McVicar, N. McClure, A.B. Atkinson, C. Mallidis, S.E.M. Lewis; Insulin dependant diabetes mellitus: implications for male reproductive function, Human Reproduction, Volume 22, Issue 7, 1 July 2007, Pages 18711877, Diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing in men of reproductive age. Despite this, the prevalence of diabetes in men attending fertility clinics is largely unknown. Furthermore, studies examining the effects of DM on sperm fertility potential have been limited to conventional semen analysis. Conventional semen analysis (semen volume, sperm count, motility and morphology) was performed for 27 diabetic (mean age 34 2 years) and 29 non-diabetic subj Continue reading >>

Low Sperm Count Concern

Low Sperm Count Concern

Share Lifestyle-related issues are increasingly being accounted for rising infertility among couples. As implied in a recent report by the International Institute of Population Sciences, infertility is high in the metro cities of India. Our country has 15-20 million reported cases, a large number considering that there are about 60-80 million couples suffering with infertility in the world. However, as opposed to the conventional perception that infertility is a women’s problem (in our society it is usually considered to be a social stigma as well); experts have noted that one-third of the cases involving infertility are concerning emerging problems with men. In this scenario, experts are now further probing reproduction issues such as sperm quality. Many factors, including lifestyle stress factors such as obesity and poor diet affect the quality of sperm production. Likewise, a nutritious diet can have a positive impact on the sperm quality. A healthy diet can boost the sperm production both in terms of quality and count. Men should be made more aware of this fact. The society needs to come to terms with the fact that even though a woman carries a baby in her womb, the fathers have an equally pivotal role to play. DIABETES AS A MAJOR FACTOR One more lifestyle factor which affects men is diabetes. It is now categorised as a serious modern lifestyle disease. The number of diabetes patients is likely to reach 70 million by 2025 (as published by the International Diabetes Federation). Most of these numbers are affecting the young adult population in India, a prime age bracket for reproduction. The rise in type 2 diabetes patients in India has led to an increase in obesity and an increased chance of suffering from heart disease. Proper diet, exercise and timely dosage of Continue reading >>

Sugar And Sperm Don't Mix

Sugar And Sperm Don't Mix

Add infertility to the lengthy list of medical problems associated with diabetes. The first research to examine the relationship between the disease and reproductive health suggests that diabetic men carry a much higher percentage of sperm with damaged DNA than do their healthy counterparts. The World Health Organization projects that the number of people with diabetes will nearly double by 2025, surpassing 300 million, due partly to an increasingly obese, inactive, and aging population. Type 1 diabetes typically manifests itself in childhood or young adulthood, while Type 2 usually strikes adults over 30. Both forms of diabetes can lead to heart and kidney disease, nerve damage, and blindness. They also can cause erectile and ejaculatory dysfunction and reduce semen quantities. But no one had investigated the disease's impact on sperm quality. Researchers at Queen's University in Belfast, U.K., analyzed semen samples from two small groups of young men attending a local fertility clinic. The first group included 27 patients with Type 1 diabetes, and the second comprised 29 nondiabetics of similar age. In today's online issue of Human Reproduction, the team reports no significant difference in the sperm concentration, appearance, or mobility between the two groups. But when the researchers performed DNA analyses, they found that 52% of sperm from diabetic men contained fragmented DNA, which could prevent them from fertilizing an egg or lead to abnormalities in the offspring. Only 32% of sperm had defective DNA in the control group. Get more great content like this delivered right to you! By signing up, you agree to share your email address with the publication. Information provided here is subject to Science's privacy policy. The problem could result from destructive fre Continue reading >>

Effects Of Diabetes On Male Fertility

Effects Of Diabetes On Male Fertility

Diabetes has been studied to be one of the most chronic diseases to affect more than 20 million Americans according to American Diabetes Association. However, with more than 50 million diabetic patients in India, the country has been taken as the world capital of diabetes with about 7.1% population. More young people are living with diabetes in the country and study has shown that it poses a significant threat to the future. Diabetes has severe effects on the male reproductive system as diabetic men have been proved to be twice standing the risk of suffering from DNA sperms damage compared to those without diabetes disease. Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre has studied and shown that diabetes reduces mobility, quality, and quantity of male sperm. If a couple is facing difficulty in having conception, the fertility issue related to diabetes in men is usually neglected as the main focus is always on women. This puts more pressure on women not knowing that men living with diabetes have lower semen volume than non-diabetic ones. Other issues that also significantly affect men with diabetes are sperm quality and DNA fragmentation, especially men who are suffering from unstable blood sugar levels called blood sugar dysfunction. The effects of diabetes in men are not only infertility but also include continuous dysfunctions, damages and failures of many organs in the body. However, for the purpose of this content, its effects on male fertility will be discussed. How does it affect? What are the infertility conditions associated with diabetes? These and much more will be highlighted. Diabetes in Men and its Effects on Fertility One of the health problems associated with diabetes in men is its effects on male fertility and overall reproductive system. Many scientists have shed Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Sexual Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Sexual Health

With chronic illness, sex often gets put on the back burner. But sexuality and sexual expression are at the top of the list when it comes to quality of life, no matter what problems a person may face. People with type 2 diabetes are no different. It’s important to recognize and address sexuality issues that affect people with diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can cause sexual complications for both genders, and can also cause gender-specific issues. A common sexuality problem in people with type 2 diabetes is a decrease in libido, or loss of a sex drive. This can be frustrating if someone had a thriving libido and satisfying sex life prior to a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Causes of a low libido associated with type 2 diabetes include: side effects of medications for high blood pressure or depression extreme fatigue lack of energy depression hormonal changes stress, anxiety, and relationship issues Diabetic neuropathy, a type of nerve damage associated with diabetes, can cause issues. Numbness, pain, or lack of feeling can also occur in the genitals. This can lead to erectile dysfunction. It may also inhibit orgasm or make it difficult to feel sexual stimulation. These side effects can make sex painful or unenjoyable. Communication between partners about sexual issues is important. A lack of communication can impact the sexual and intimate side of a relationship. An illness can make it easy for couples to “check out” of the relationship sexually. Sometimes it may seem easier to avoid talking about this issue rather than seeking a solution. If one partner becomes the primary caregiver of the other, it can also change how each person views the other. It’s easy to get caught up in the roles of “patient” and “caregiver” and let the romance can slip away. The most wide Continue reading >>

Diabetes Effects Sperm Quality

Diabetes Effects Sperm Quality

Diabetes in men has a direct effect on fertility, a scientist told the 24th annual conference of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology today (Wednesday 9 July). Dr. Con Mallidis from Queen's University, Belfast, UK, said that, despite the prevailing view that it had little effect on male reproductive function, the Belfast group had shown that diabetes caused DNA damage in sperm. The increase in the numbers of diabetics diagnosed at a young age has coincided with worldwide concerns over male fertility, he told the conference. "But this is not simply a coincidence," he said. "We have shown for the first time that diabetes adversely influences male fertility at a molecular level." The scientists studied semen samples from men with diabetes who were receiving insulin therapy. On initial routine microscopic examination the semen samples appeared normal, apart from a slight decrease in volume. "But when we looked for DNA damage, we saw a very different picture," said Dr. Mallidis, adding that this is not part of a routine semen analysis. "Sperm RNA was significantly altered, and many of the changes we observed are in RNA transcripts involved in DNA repair. And comparison with a database of men of proven fertility confirmed our findings. Diabetics have a significant decrease in their ability to repair sperm DNA, and once this is damaged it cannot be restored." Transcription is the synthesis of RNA under the direction of DNA, and is the first step towards gene expression, where the information from the gene becomes a product such as a protein translating the genetic information into a cellular function. If there are errors in transcription, there will also be errors in the function of the gene. "We were particularly interested to see a fourteen-fold decrease Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Male Infertility: What Are The Concerns?

Diabetes And Male Infertility: What Are The Concerns?

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic with significant impacts on multiple aspects of men's health. 3.5 in every 1000 reproductive aged men (18-45 years old) in the United States are living with diabetes 1. While it is true that many Americans are aware of diabetes' impact on cardiovascular, renal, ophthalmologic, and neurologic health, many do not know that it can also negatively impact fertility. This occurs through a number of ways including: erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction, hypogonadism and semen abnormalities. Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for developing erectile dysfunction. Diabetes affects the nerves and blood vessels throughout the body, including those that supply the penis. Damage to the nerves can cause decreased sensation and arousal, while the decreased blood flow to the penis can lead to difficulty achieving or maintaining erections firm enough for a satisfactory sexual encounter 2. Solutions for men suffering from erectile dysfunction are wide and varied, and the first line treatments are oral medications called PDE 5 inhibitors (Cialis, Levitra, Stendra, Viagra). These medications help relax the smooth muscle in the penis, thereby increasing the blood flow and allowing for erections. If oral medications fail, patients may be offered intracavernosal injections, intraurethral suppositories, vacuum erectile devices with constricting bands, and penile prosthesis surgery 3. Ejaculatory dysfunction is another problem encountered among men with diabetes. Normal ejaculation is essential to allow for deposition of semen into the female reproductive tract, where male sperm can then fertilize a female egg. Damage to the nerves from long standing diabetes can cause a failure of the mechanism that propels sperm forward. This can allow sperm to go bac Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Affect Men's Fertility

Diabetes May Affect Men's Fertility

May 2, 2007 -- Men with type 1 diabetes may have more DNA damage in their sperm, possibly hampering fertility, a preliminary study shows. The study was small and doesn't prove that type 1 diabetes causes male infertility. But the findings deserve further research, write the researchers, who are based in Belfast, Northern Ireland. They included Ishola Agbaje, MD, of the Reproductive Medicine Research Group at Queen's University of Belfast. Agbaje and colleagues studied semen and blood samples from 27 men with type 1 diabetes. Those men weren't necessarily infertile; they were invited to participate in the study while getting routine diabetes checkups. For comparison, the researchers also studied semen and blood samples from 29 men without diabetes who were undergoing infertility tests. Both groups of men were in their early to mid-30s, on average. The men with diabetes had lower semen volume than the men without diabetes. But the diabetes patients' semen volume was still within the normal range set by the World Health Organization (WHO). Sperm count, shape, and motion (motility) were similar in both groups of men. But when the researchers analyzed the sperms' DNA, they found more DNA damage in the diabetes patients' sperm. Sperm damage may increase infertility, note the researchers. Many factors can cause DNA damage. It's not clear whether diabetes was responsible for the DNA damage seen in the study. The study didn't include any men without diabetes who weren't undergoing infertility tests. Such men might have even less DNA damage in their sperm than the study groups, the researchers note. Agbaje's team calls for further studies on DNA sperm damage -- and its possible fertility consequences -- in men with type 1 diabetes. The study appears online in the journal Human Re Continue reading >>

Strong Swimmers: The Truth About What’s Killing Your Sperm

Strong Swimmers: The Truth About What’s Killing Your Sperm

We've all heard the warning: If you stay in the hot tub too long, you'll become impotent. The truth is, there isn't much scientific basis for this one. If you're obese, smoke, or dabble in steroids, though? Well, let's just say it hurts your chances of getting pregnant as much as you getting a date. We pored over prominent studies and reached out to Dr. James F. Smith, director of male reproductive health at the University of California, San Francisco to help guide us through the truths (and half-truths) about what's killing your sperm. Show Stoppers Smoking tobacco: Tobacco has been linked to sperm that is abnormal in terms of movement (motility), appearance, and ability to fertilize. The chemicals in cigarettes may also damage DNA. Women exposed to secondhand smoke while pregnant are 20 percent more likely to give birth to a low-birth-weight baby, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Being obese: Without question, this is a fertility blocker: Obesity can reduce circulation, which plays an important role in erection, and directly impair sperm through hormonal changes. Having sex too often: Most men need approximately 48 hours after an ejaculation to produce the optimal amount of sperm. The more a man ejaculates in close succession, the lower his count will likely be. Not having sex often enough: If a man waits more than about three days after a prior ejaculation to ejaculate again, some of the sperm in his ejaculate may decrease in quality. According to a 2009 study, daily sex may make for healthier sperm because it reduces exposure of these cells to free radicals. Having radiation or chemotherapy: These potentially live-saving treatments can have severe side effects, including infertility. “Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are always a very Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Male Fertility And Epigenetic Regulation During Spermatogenesis

The Effects Of Diabetes On Male Fertility And Epigenetic Regulation During Spermatogenesis

Go to: GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN SPERM Sperm cell is the most differentiated mammalian cell. The main goal of sperm consists of transferring male haploid DNA to female DNA through a series of mechanisms that imply their displacement along the female genital tract and fertilizing ability.11 Energy in sperm cells is mainly used to maintain the motility to complete capacitation and subsequent acrosome reaction.12,13,14 Sperm cells need energy to acquire and maintain motion competence after epididymal maturation because they are actually immotile in testis.14 Much adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in sperms is consumed for maintaining the motility. Except some metabolites, such as lactate and citrate, sperm mainly utilize sugars as an energy fuel including glucose, mannose, and fructose. The two main metabolic pathways involved in energy generation are anaerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation.15 Inhibitors of either oxidative metabolism or glycolysis in many species show that either pathway alone can maintain mobility independently.16 Sperm metabolism can proceed through glycolysis, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation or the pentose phosphate pathway. The predominant pathway used depends on species, oxygen content and/or hexose availability. In fact, sperm have a mitochondrial sheath in the midpiece, where the oxidative processes may take place.15 Therefore, the most important glycolytic enzymes are mainly located in the principal piece of the tail which is connected to the fibrous sheath.15,17,18,19,20,21 Glucides are polar molecules that are rich in -OH groups and can passively cross the lipidic bilayer in a very slow and inefficient manner. Therefore, carriers are required when cells uptake glucides.15 An important role of supplying cells with energy is realized by Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fertility Problems

Diabetes And Fertility Problems

What is Diabetes? Diabetes is medical condition where the body can no longer control the amount of glucose (a type of sugar) within the blood. There are two types of diabetes, aptly named type 1 and type 2. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes accounts for almost 10% of all diabetes cases. It is caused by the immune system destroying the cells that make insulin (the hormone that controls the levels of glucose in your blood). Type 1 diabetes can be triggered by viral or bacterial infections, autoimmune reactions or chemical toxins. Type 2 Diabetes This is by far the most common cause of diabetes, accounting for just over 90% of diabetes cases. It is caused by the body’s cells becoming resistant to the hormone insulin, reducing the amount of glucose taken up from the blood. Poor diet, obesity and low levels of exercise are thought to be the primary causes of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes and Male Fertility Diabetes can directly affect male fertility by damaging the sperm and also increases the risk of developing the following conditions: Erectile Dysfunction – not being able to maintain or even get an erection Retarded Ejaculation – where ejaculation is delayed Retrograde Ejaculation – where the semen goes into the bladder instead of being ejaculated Reduced Sperm Quality – damaged and/or misshaped sperm Reduced Sperm Quantity – lower numbers of sperm Hypogonadism – lower quantities of the hormone testosterone Diabetes and Female Fertility In women diabetes can interfere with the implantation of the egg into the womb lining and its normal development, especially in the very early stages of pregnancy. High glucose levels may also interfere with the normal hormonal balance required for a regular cycle. In addition, type 1 diabetics may have associated problems with aut Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Reproductive Health

Diabetes & Reproductive Health

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which there is too much glucose (a sugar that is the body’s main source of energy) in the blood. If undetected or not controlled, diabetes can cause complications both in the short term (including increased risk of infections) and long term (see below). Diabetes develops when the pancreas, the gland that makes insulin, is either unable to make insulin or the insulin does not work properly. Without enough insulin (a hormone that lowers glucose levels in the blood) blood glucose levels rise and lead to health problems. What are the different types of diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes can begin at any age but often starts in childhood or young adulthood. A person with type 1 diabetes cannot make enough insulin and must have insulin every day to live. About 85 per cent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which is linked to diet, lack of exercise, obesity and family history. A person with type 2 diabetes does not produce enough insulin to control their blood glucose levels. Can diabetes be prevented? Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented. However, type 2 diabetes may be prevented by a healthy lifestyle including regular physical activity, a healthy diet and keeping weight in the healthy range. Visit the Diabetes Australia website (www.diabetesaustralia.com.au) for more general information about diabetes and its treatment. What health problems are caused by diabetes? If undetected or poorly controlled, diabetes can lead to a shorter life. Diabetes can cause blindness, kidney failure, nerve damage, reduced blood circulation that may lead to lower limb amputation, and can increase the chance of cardiovascular disease (heart attack and stroke). Men with diabetes also have a higher chance of deve Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Kill Sperm Count?

Does Diabetes Kill Sperm Count?

Yes, diabetes can hit a man's fertility big time. High blood glucose levels are the problem. Certain studies claim that most of today's Indians are suffering from diabetes. Married men who fall prey to diabetes find it tough to impregnate their partners due to several reasons. Also Read: Do Nuts Increase Sperm Production? Also, the wife of a diabetic man may have a higher chance of suffering a miscarriage. So, diabetes is one big enemy of fertility. Here are some more facts. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Infertility In Men?

Can Diabetes Cause Infertility In Men?

According to a recent report by IDF (International Diabetes Federation), India continues to be the “diabetes capital” of the world, and by 2030, nearly 9 percent of the country’s population is likely to be affected by diabetes. Given the stats, it is important to keep your blood glucose level in control, especially if you are planning to start a family as diabetes can affect your sex life as well. Women can suffer from diabetes during pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes, which can put the mother and the child at risk of diabetes in the near future, but high blood glucose level in men (if left uncontrolled) can cause infertility. Dr Anubha Singh, Gynecologist and IVF Specialist from Shantah IVF Centre shares how diabetes can cause male infertility. How diabetes causes male infertility Not many people know that men with diabetes may take longer to bring about a conception in their wives. Diabetes can directly affect the fertility in the human body, and the chances of infertility in men with diabetes are higher as compared to infertility in women with diabetes. This is because high glucose level causes oxidative stress which damages the DNA of the sperm. Fragmented or damaged DNA further causes a natural death of the cells making it difficult for men to make their wives pregnant. Not just this, uncontrolled diabetes can affect the small blood vessels and nerves that lead to ejaculation, leading to erectile dysfunction. Moreover, increased blood glucose levels can lower the levels of testosterone, a hormone that controls sexual drive in men. Here’s more on ways diabetes kills your sex life. On the other hand, if your wife is pregnant with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, she might have the higher chances of abortion or miscarriage. Moreover, babies of a mother with g Continue reading >>

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