diabetestalk.net

Does Type 1 Diabetes Affect Sperm Quality

Diabetes Effects Sperm Quality

Diabetes Effects Sperm Quality

Diabetes in men has a direct effect on fertility, a scientist told the 24th annual conference of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology today (Wednesday 9 July). Dr. Con Mallidis from Queen's University, Belfast, UK, said that, despite the prevailing view that it had little effect on male reproductive function, the Belfast group had shown that diabetes caused DNA damage in sperm. The increase in the numbers of diabetics diagnosed at a young age has coincided with worldwide concerns over male fertility, he told the conference. "But this is not simply a coincidence," he said. "We have shown for the first time that diabetes adversely influences male fertility at a molecular level." The scientists studied semen samples from men with diabetes who were receiving insulin therapy. On initial routine microscopic examination the semen samples appeared normal, apart from a slight decrease in volume. "But when we looked for DNA damage, we saw a very different picture," said Dr. Mallidis, adding that this is not part of a routine semen analysis. "Sperm RNA was significantly altered, and many of the changes we observed are in RNA transcripts involved in DNA repair. And comparison with a database of men of proven fertility confirmed our findings. Diabetics have a significant decrease in their ability to repair sperm DNA, and once this is damaged it cannot be restored." Transcription is the synthesis of RNA under the direction of DNA, and is the first step towards gene expression, where the information from the gene becomes a product such as a protein translating the genetic information into a cellular function. If there are errors in transcription, there will also be errors in the function of the gene. "We were particularly interested to see a fourteen-fold decrease Continue reading >>

Diabetes Linked To Male Infertility

Diabetes Linked To Male Infertility

UK scientists have discovered that DNA damage in the sperm of diabetic men is higher than in the sperm of men who do not have diabetes. They suggest this may make diabetic men less fertile. You can read about the study in the journal Human Reproduction. The researchers, led by Dr Ishola Agbaje, a research fellow in the Reproductive Medicine Research Group at Queen's University, Belfast, compared the quality of the sperm from diabetic men with non-diabetic men by examining nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) . The participants were 27 diabetic men whose average age was 34 and 29 non-diabetic men whose average age was 33. The results showed that: -- Semen volume was lower in diabetic men compared with non-diabetic men (2.6 and 3.3 ml respectively). -- But sperm concentration was not significantly different between the two groups. -- Total sperm output, form, structure and "motility" (ability to move) were also largely the same in the diabetic and non-diabetic men. -- The nuclear DNA in diabetic men's sperm cells was more fragmented than that of the non-diabetic men (52 per cent versus 32 per cent). -- There were more deletions in the mitochondrial DNA of diabetic men's sperm cells than those of the non-diabetic men. -- The mitochondrial DNA deletions in the diabetic men's sperm cells ranged from 3 to 6 and averaged 4, while for the non-diabetic men it ranged from 1 to 4 and averaged 3. The study concluded that: "Diabetes is associated with increased sperm nuclear and mtDNA damage that may impair the reproductive capability of these men." Deletions and fragmentation of DNA results in loss of genetic material which, in the case of nuclear DNA, causes infertility as the sperm is not able to deliver its full complement of genetic codes in fusion with the egg to create a via Continue reading >>

Insulin Dependant Diabetes Mellitus: Implications For Male Reproductive Function

Insulin Dependant Diabetes Mellitus: Implications For Male Reproductive Function

Insulin dependant diabetes mellitus: implications for male reproductive function Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Correspondence address. Tel: +44-28-9063-5060 ; Fax: Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Regional Centre for Endocrinology and Diabetes Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Reproductive Medicine Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences Queen's University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Human Reproduction, Volume 22, Issue 7, 1 July 2007, Pages 18711877, I.M. Agbaje, D.A. Rogers, C.M. McVicar, N. McClure, A.B. Atkinson, C. Mallidis, S.E.M. Lewis; Insulin dependant diabetes mellitus: implications for male reproductive function, Human Reproduction, Volume 22, Issue 7, 1 July 2007, Pages 18711877, Diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing in men of reproductive age. Despite this, the prevalence of diabetes in men attending fertility clinics is largely unknown. Furthermore, studies examining the effects of DM on sperm fertility potential have been limited to conventional semen analysis. Conventional semen analysis (semen volume, sperm count, motility and morphology) was performed for 27 diabetic (mean age 34 2 years) and 29 non-diabetic subj Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fertility: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Fertility

Diabetes And Fertility: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Fertility

You’ve have been trying with no luck to get pregnant and have not been able to a find a reason for your infertility. You may have tried a fertility cleanse, begun eating a fertility diet, and are taking all the right supplements and herbs, but are still having trouble conceiving. It may be time to have a simple blood test to determine if your glucose levels are too high. With the rates of Type II diabetes rising every year in the U.S., more and more infertility specialists are looking toward this health issue as a main cause of some otherwise unexplained infertility cases they see. According to the American Diabetes Association, there are more than 200,000 new cases of Type II diabetes diagnosed every year, with another 2.4% of the general childbearing population suffering from the disease but not knowing it. When it comes to diabetes and infertility the answer is clear: there is a connection. No, in many cases (especially among women), diabetes alone does not keep them from getting pregnant, but it oftentimes keeps them from staying pregnant. In many cases, say fertility doctors, “a woman with higher than normal glucose levels does get pregnant month after month. Unfortunately her diabetes status prevents that embryo from implanting in the uterus, causing a miscarriage before she ever realizes she is pregnant.” In this case, the diabetes isn’t preventing conception, but is preventing an ongoing pregnancy. High glucose levels are reported to increase a woman’s chances of miscarriage by 30-60% according to statistics released by the American Diabetes Association. Even when implantation does occur, there are other risks to consider, including: An increased risk of birth defects due to damage caused to embryonic cells form the high levels of glucose in the blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Affect Men's Fertility

Diabetes May Affect Men's Fertility

May 2, 2007 -- Men with type 1 diabetes may have more DNA damage in their sperm, possibly hampering fertility, a preliminary study shows. The study was small and doesn't prove that type 1 diabetes causes male infertility. But the findings deserve further research, write the researchers, who are based in Belfast, Northern Ireland. They included Ishola Agbaje, MD, of the Reproductive Medicine Research Group at Queen's University of Belfast. Agbaje and colleagues studied semen and blood samples from 27 men with type 1 diabetes. Those men weren't necessarily infertile; they were invited to participate in the study while getting routine diabetes checkups. For comparison, the researchers also studied semen and blood samples from 29 men without diabetes who were undergoing infertility tests. Both groups of men were in their early to mid-30s, on average. The men with diabetes had lower semen volume than the men without diabetes. But the diabetes patients' semen volume was still within the normal range set by the World Health Organization (WHO). Sperm count, shape, and motion (motility) were similar in both groups of men. But when the researchers analyzed the sperms' DNA, they found more DNA damage in the diabetes patients' sperm. Sperm damage may increase infertility, note the researchers. Many factors can cause DNA damage. It's not clear whether diabetes was responsible for the DNA damage seen in the study. The study didn't include any men without diabetes who weren't undergoing infertility tests. Such men might have even less DNA damage in their sperm than the study groups, the researchers note. Agbaje's team calls for further studies on DNA sperm damage -- and its possible fertility consequences -- in men with type 1 diabetes. The study appears online in the journal Human Re Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Sperm

The Effects Of Diabetes On Sperm

Diabetes And Male Fertility The profound effects of diabetes are very far reaching. While most diabetics are able to control the disease with proper diet, exercise, and in many cases with insulin, sometimes the disease takes a toll that goes unnoticed until a man wants to have a family. It is well documented that defective sperm DNA is one cause of male infertility, pregnancy failure and miscarriage. What is also well documented is the rapid rise in the type 2 diabetes in the adult population. What The Research Found Dr. Ishola Agbaje, research fellow in the Reproductive Medicine Research Group at Queen's University, Belfast, along with Professor Sheena Lewis, conducted a study of 565 sperm samples which compared the quality of DNA in sperm from men with diabetes to those without the disease. The findings indicated that approximately 52% of sperm cells from diabetic men were fragmented compared with 32% in men who do not have diabetes. There was also a higher rate of deletions of DNA in the mitochondria of the cells. Volume of semen was much lower in men with diabetes although the motility, structure and density of sperm did not differ from men without the disease. The men studied for this research had type 1 diabetes, the kind in which the body fails to produce insulin. The more common type of diabetes is type 2, the form in which the body does not produce enough insulin or it does not respond properly to the insulin it does produce. The researchers found that regardless whether the man has type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the same DNA damage is found in the sperm. Diabetes Is On The Rise The disconcerting information that comes out of this study is the fact that diabetes is on the rise. It is known that both diet and obesity are key factors in the increase of type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

Does Having Type 1 Diabetes Affect Levels Of Fertility?

Does Having Type 1 Diabetes Affect Levels Of Fertility?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Does having type 1 diabetes affect levels of fertility? Hello, I'm just posting here because I am very curious about this question, I'm 19 years old and have had type 1 for about 8 years now, and this question has popped up into my mind a few times, but does having diabetes actually affect the chances of having children when your older. I don't plan on having children for a while that's why I'm curious, the longer I wait the less chance of having children? I would love to have children when I'm older that's why I've been thinking about this. if bs control is fine there is no such question Diabetic Krissy Type 1 Well-Known Member From what I have read you are more at risk of things (If your levels are not under control) However I don't think it affects your fertility at all. I don't think so. I conceived my son accidentally, so wasn't even trying - and my daughter after only a few months. I think if your levels are high you can miscarry more, or have problems later on in the pregnancy, but the actual sperm-meets-egg part isn't affected. Pretty lucky really seeing as diabetes seems to affect just about everything else in our bodies! From a male to a male.... Adam.... Diabetes can affect you ability to perform sexually especially if you do not have good control. (micro & macro vasular issues) It can also lead to lower testosterone levels so as a male, I am sure it can affect fertility. My advice to you is to keep good stable control and to try and keep your HBA1C between 6 and 8%. Something for you to think about is: as a diabetic male, we have a higher rate of passing on diabetes to the child - More so than a diabetic woman. When you do plan to have kid Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Infertility In Males

Type 1 Diabetes And Infertility In Males

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. My wife and I are having trouble in the "baby making" department. LOL. We had no problem with our son 3 years ago, before I was diagnosed with T1 at 35 years old. Since being diagnosed we've been through one misscarriage and multiple months of failed attempts at getting pregnant. I can't help but think the problem is being caused by my new condition. Especially since my glucose levels have been higher than normal over the last few months. My last A1C was 7.2. I'm used to seeing A1C's around 6.2. If I had to guess, my current A1C would probably be around 7.5. Our real concern is that we just found an online article that says T1 in men can cause DNA mutations in sperm cells, which can cause birth defects, still births, etc, etc. We would really like to have one more baby, but this is a VERY scary realization. I'm going to do more research and talk to my family doctor, endocrinologist, and others....but if anyone has any experience or knowledge in this area it would be greatly appreciated. The problem with articles about diabetes is that they lump all diabetics together. I'm no authority but I would not doubt that out of control diabetics sperm would be effected since high blood sugar effects every part of your body. It may also be the reason your wife is not getting pregnant. I also wouldn't doubt that it would also have the same effect on a type 2 with out of control diabetes. There are type 1 women here who have had successful pregnancies and births but they have altered their diet to keep their BG low You can do something about your high blood glucose. I suggest you get and read Dr. Bernstei Continue reading >>

Reproductive Function In Male Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

Reproductive Function In Male Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract This study was undertaken to evaluate conventional and some of the main bio-functional spermatozoa parameters, serum gonadal hormones and didymo-epididymal ultrasound features in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). DM1 affects an increasing number of men of reproductive age. Diabetes may affect male reproduction by acting on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, causing sexual dysfunction or disrupting male accessory gland function. However, data on spermatozoa parameters and other aspects of the reproductive function in these patients are scanty. Thirty-two patients with DM1 [27.0 (25.0-30.0 years)] and 20 age-matched fertile healthy men [28.0 (27.25-30.75 years)] were enrolled. Patients with diabetic neuropathy, other endocrine disorders or conditions known to alter spermatozoa parameters were excluded. Each subject underwent semen analysis, blood withdrawal for fasting and post-prandial glycaemia, hormonal analysis and didymo-epididymal ultrasound evaluation before and after ejaculation. Patients with DM1 had a lower percentage of spermatozoa with progressive motility [10.0 (7.0-12.75) vs. 45.0 (42.0-47.75) %; p < 0.01] and a higher percentage of spermatozoa with abnormal mitochondrial function than controls [47.0 (43.0-55.0) vs. 2.0 (1.0-5.0) %; p < 0.01]. Patients also had greater post-ejaculatory diameters of cephalic [11.5 (10.2-13.6) vs. 6.0 (4.0-7.0) mm; p < 0.01] and caudal epididymis [5.5 (4.00-7.55) vs. 3.0 (2.0-4.0) mm; p < 0.01] compared to controls, suggesting a lack of the physiological post-ejaculation epididymal shrinkage. Correlation analysis suggested that progressive motility was associated with fasting glucose (r = -0.68; p < 0.01). The other parameters did not show any significant difference. Patients with DM1 had a lower Continue reading >>

Will Diabetes Make Me Infertile?

Will Diabetes Make Me Infertile?

According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 20 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes, and more than eight million are undiagnosed but assumed to have the condition. Diabetes is a serious health concern which requires careful attention and monitoring of diet, exercise and lifestyle habits. When diabetics take care of themselves, they can lead normal, healthy lives with relatively minimal daily impact from their condition. However, one unexpected concern that doesn’t usually come up in diabetes discussions with men is their fertility and the effect diabetes can have on trying to conceive. How does diabetes affect fertility? In men, diabetes is known to cause certain medical issues that make conception difficult or not possible without treatment. These conditions include erectile dysfunction, retrograde ejaculation, retarded (delayed) ejaculation, low sperm quality, and low testosterone, also known as hypogonadism. What are these male infertility conditions? Erectile dysfunction – Men who struggle with erectile dysfunction are unable to get or maintain an erection. Erectile dysfunction is caused by nerve damage and issues with proper blood circulation. It is most common in long-term diabetics and those with untreated diabetes. Retrograde ejaculation – This is when semen enters your bladder instead of exiting the body. This is not a serious health concern, but it will make it difficult to conceive without assisted reproductive technology. Retarded ejaculation – This is when a man struggles to ejaculate due to penile nerve damage, certain medications, stress or psychological issues, or diabetes. Assisted reproductive services are needed in order to address infertility caused by nerve damage. Low sperm quality – Sperm quality and sperm motility Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Affect Fertility?

Does Diabetes Affect Fertility?

There was a time when women who had diabetes were strongly advised to avoid getting pregnant. Attempting to produce a biologically-related family was just too dangerous [source: Brucker]. Fortunately, diabetic women are no longer given that heartbreaking direction from caregivers. Diabetics can, and routinely do, get pregnant and give birth to healthy children. Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, however, can still be a major factor in fertility for men or women. There are challenges diabetics face in getting a partner pregnant, becoming pregnant, maintaining a pregnancy and ensuring they give birth to a healthy, full-term baby. Diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2) can harm sperm [source: Paddock]. Type 2 diabetes can make it far more difficult to become pregnant. There's an increased rate of miscarriage among diabetics in general, and women with Type 1 diabetes are somewhat more likely to have a baby with a birth defect or a child born prematurely [source: MyDr]. However, all of these challenges can largely be managed by being attentive to and responding to signals from the body. In order to understand why diabetes affects reproduction, it helps to have a general understanding of the disease in both of its forms. A healthy human body digests food and -- with the help of a hormone called insulin -- transports a form of sugar known as glucose through the bloodstream to cells for energy. Diabetics have flaws in their metabolism. A Type 1 diabetic's body doesn't make insulin. The body of a Type 2 diabetic either fails to create enough insulin, the person's cells don't react properly to the insulin or both malfunctions occur [source: Nordqvist]. Click ahead to learn the specifics of how Type 1 diabetes influences reproduction and how it can be managed. You've undoubtedly heard a pregnant wom Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat

Based on the feedback received from doctors reading the blog, we are introducing a new feature: Case of the Month. This Case of the Month is an actual patient from The Turek Clinic. It is presented to recognize American Diabetes Association Alert Day. The Case of Male Infertility He is a 31-year old who has been trying to conceive with his 28-year old wife for 2 years. During this time, he has noticed a lower sex drive and has had trouble ejaculating. His medical history is negative except for a 6-year history of diabetes mellitus that is well controlled with insulin injections. Exacerbated, he states “I really don’t know what’s happening to me!” Upon further questioning, the sex drive issue started even before they were trying to conceive. Regarding ejaculation, the patient states that his erections are not very strong and, although he has the sensation of climax, nothing comes out of the penis with ejaculation. In fact, he is concerned that things might be “backing up” in his body with these symptoms. A Short Review of Diabetes First identified as a disease of “sweet urine” in ancient times, diabetes mellitus a metabolic disease characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels. It is one of the most common medical diseases in the U.S., affecting 26 million adults and children or about 8% of the population. Among those affected, about 15 million are people of reproductive age. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. When the blood glucose rises, say after eating food, insulin is released to decrease the glucose level. In patients with diabetes, there is low or no production of insulin and therefore blood sugar levels are elevated. The sugars spill into the urine, hence the term “sweet uri Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Male Fertility - Infertility, Retrograde Ejaculation, Sperm Quality

Diabetes And Male Fertility - Infertility, Retrograde Ejaculation, Sperm Quality

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem associated with diabetes that causes difficulty with getting or maintaining an erection. It is caused by neuropathy (nerve damage) and reduced blood circulation typically as a result of less well controlled diabetes or long standing diabetes. High levels of blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol are all associated with an increased risk of erectile difficulties. Getting these under control, as well as cutting down on alcohol and quitting smoking can help to reduce the effects of ED. A number of different treatment options are also available. Ejaculation problems can also result if nerves in the penis become damaged . Lack of nerve sensitivity is one problem which can affect the ability to ejaculation. Retarded, delayed and impaired ejaculation are all terms which describe a difficulty in achieving ejaculation. Note that retarded ejaculation can also be caused or influenced by psychological problems, age and by certain medications. If impaired ejaculation is brought on psychological problems then treatment, such as through counselling or psychosexual therapy . Ejaculation problems caused by nerve damage tend not to be treatable but it may be possible to find sex positions that result in improved nerve stimulation. Assisted reproduction technology (ART), such as IVF, can help with treating infertility if conception via intercourse is problematic or impossible. Another problem that may result from neuropathy ( autonomic neuropathy ) is retrograde ejaculation. This occurs if nerves are unable to control the muscles of the bladder from closing at the point of ejaculation, which results in semen entering the bladder rather than exiting via the penis. Retrograde ejaculation does not cause health problems but can impair conceptio Continue reading >>

Sugar And Sperm Don't Mix

Sugar And Sperm Don't Mix

Add infertility to the lengthy list of medical problems associated with diabetes. The first research to examine the relationship between the disease and reproductive health suggests that diabetic men carry a much higher percentage of sperm with damaged DNA than do their healthy counterparts. The World Health Organization projects that the number of people with diabetes will nearly double by 2025, surpassing 300 million, due partly to an increasingly obese, inactive, and aging population. Type 1 diabetes typically manifests itself in childhood or young adulthood, while Type 2 usually strikes adults over 30. Both forms of diabetes can lead to heart and kidney disease, nerve damage, and blindness. They also can cause erectile and ejaculatory dysfunction and reduce semen quantities. But no one had investigated the disease's impact on sperm quality. Researchers at Queen's University in Belfast, U.K., analyzed semen samples from two small groups of young men attending a local fertility clinic. The first group included 27 patients with Type 1 diabetes, and the second comprised 29 nondiabetics of similar age. In today's online issue of Human Reproduction, the team reports no significant difference in the sperm concentration, appearance, or mobility between the two groups. But when the researchers performed DNA analyses, they found that 52% of sperm from diabetic men contained fragmented DNA, which could prevent them from fertilizing an egg or lead to abnormalities in the offspring. Only 32% of sperm had defective DNA in the control group. Get more great content like this delivered right to you! By signing up, you agree to share your email address with the publication. Information provided here is subject to Science's privacy policy. The problem could result from destructive fre Continue reading >>

Sperm Quality In Adult Diabetic Men.

Sperm Quality In Adult Diabetic Men.

Abstract In 65 adult diabetic men and 77 control men without diabetes, both groups without any problems as to fertility, the following characteristics of ejaculate have been compared: volume of seminal fluid, sperm concentration per milliliter, total sperm count, sperm morphology, and motility at 1, 3, and 5 hours after ejaculation. In the entire diabetic group, sperm morphology and motility at 1 hour after ejaculation was statistically significantly worse. In 15 diabetics without sexual disurbances only sperm morphology was statistically significantly worse compared with an equally large control groups. In 50 diabetics with erection disturbances, sperm volume and motility in three successive observations were statistically remarkably lower. In younger age subgroups, the differences between diabetics and nondiabetics were more marked than in older age subgroups. The patients' age, when diabetes was discovered in them, did not essentially influence the quality of the ejaculate where diabetes lasted 8 or more years. Diabetics over 40 years' age displayed a significantly lower sperm volume. The total sperm count and motility at 3 and 5 hours after ejaculation, with 12 or more years' duration of diabetes, differed from diabetes of 2 years' duration. On the basis of these observations a negative influence of diabetes on the quality of the ejaculate seems unquestionable. There exists great variability in the adverse effect on the individual diabetic. Also, the individual characteristics of the ejaculate are affected, usually, to a different extent: the most frequently and markedly affected being the sperm motility, then morphology and/or volume of ejaculate, and the least often and the least conspicuously, the sperm count. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes