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Does Sunburn Affect Diabetes

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

To date, 2016 has been the hottest year ever, and it’s getting hotter. From now on, coping with heat will be an important part of managing diabetes. Some knowledge that might help you: 1. High body temperatures can lower blood sugar. Mayo Clinic writers Nancy Klobassa Davidson, RN, and Peggy Moreland, RN, CDE, say you should check your sugars more often in the hot weather. 2. Sunburn can raise blood sugar. The Mayo Clinic advises wearing a good sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat while out in the sun. 3. Warm skin absorbs insulin faster, while dehydrated skin absorbs insulin more slowly. The closer you can keep your injection site to normal temperature and hydration, the better. 4. Dehydration from sweating can raise blood sugar and can lead to heat exhaustion. According to the Cleveland Clinic, people with diabetes are more likely than others to be admitted to hospitals for dehydration and heat exhaustion, and to die from it. High glucose levels lead to urinating more, which increases risk for dehydration. This may be especially true if you’re on an SGLT-2 inhibitor drug. Keep drinking water with a bit of salt if you are blessed to live in an area where water is available. Have a bottle with you and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Learn to check yourself for dehydration by pinching up some skin on your arm and letting it go. It should snap right back into place. If it goes more slowly, you are getting dehydrated. Don’t drink alcohol or caffeine in super-hot weather, as they are dehydrating. 5. Heat can damage insulin, other medications, and test strips. The Joslin Clinic advises people to keep their insulin cool, but not on ice. If you take medicines with you while you’re away from home, get a cooler bag to keep your medicines and test strips in. Ext Continue reading >>

The Claim: Diabetes Makes You Sensitive To Heat

The Claim: Diabetes Makes You Sensitive To Heat

THE FACTS Summer can be uncomfortable for anyone. But for people with diabetes, the heat and humidity can be particularly hazardous. One of the complications of diabetes, both Type 1 and Type 2, is an impaired ability to adjust to rises in temperature, which can cause dangerous increases in body temperature during the summer. The underlying problem, nerve damage, occurs in 60 to 70 percent of Americans with diabetes; it can affect nearly every organ in the body, including sweat glands. When nerve damage keeps the sweat glands from working properly, the body fails to cool down as the mercury rises. In one small study, scientists compared diabetic patients and a group of healthy control subjects as they were exposed to increasing temperatures. The subjects were hooked up to devices that measured skin temperature, core temperature and sweat rates. As temperatures rose, the control subjects’ perspiration rates increased proportionately; their core temperatures stayed constant. “For subjects with diabetes, sweat seemed to plateau irrespective of an alarming rise in core temperature,” the scientists wrote. “The diabetic subjects’ generalized inability to sweat across the body had a profound effect on core temperature.” Research by the Mayo Clinic in Arizona shows that diabetic patients have higher rates of adverse events — like hospitalizations, dehydration and death — in the heat. Yet a survey by the clinic found that many were unaware of the greater risk and the need for special precautions. THE BOTTOM LINE People with diabetes are particularly vulnerable to hot weather. ANAHAD O’CONNOR [email protected] Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Want another reason to get your blood sugar levels under control and keep them that way? Doing so can help you avoid many diabetes skin problems. Still, skin conditions related to this disease are common. As many as 1 out of 3 people with diabetes will have one. Fortunately, most can be or successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Common Skin Conditions Linked to Diabetes Itching skin, also called pruritus, can have many causes, such as dry skin, poor blood flow, or a yeast infection. When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet. Lotion can help to keep your skin soft and moist, and prevent itching due to dry skin. Bacterial infections: Staphylococcus skin infections are more common and more serious in people with poorly controlled diabetes. When hair follicles are irritated, these bacteria can cause boils or an inflamed bump. Other infections include: Styes, which are infections of the eyelid glands Nail infections Most bacterial infections need to be treated with antibiotic pills. Talk with your doctor. Fungal infections: Warm, moist folds of the skin are the perfect breeding ground for these infections. Three common fungal infections are: Jock itch (red, itchy area on the genitals and the inside of the thighs) Athlete's foot (affects the skin between the toes) Ringworm (ring-shaped, scaly patches that can itch or blister and appear on the feet, groin, chest, stomach, scalp, or nails). A yeast-like fungus called "Candida albicans" causes many of the fungal infections that happen to people with diabetes. Women are likely to get this in their vaginas. People also tend to get this infection on the corners of their mouth. It feels like small cuts and is called "angular ch Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

10 Surprising Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

When you first found out you had diabetes, you tested your blood sugar often to understand how food, activity, stress, and illness could affect your blood sugar levels. By now, you’ve got it figured out for the most part. But then—bam! Something makes your blood sugar zoom up. You try to adjust it with food or activity or insulin, and it dips really low. You’re on a rollercoaster no one with diabetes wants to ride. Knowledge is power! Look out for these surprising triggers that can send your blood sugar soaring: Sunburn—the pain causes stress, and stress increases blood sugar levels. Artificial sweeteners—more research needs to be done, but some studies show they can raise blood sugar. Coffee—even without sweetener. Some people’s blood sugar is extra-sensitive to caffeine. Losing sleep—even just one night of too little sleep can make your body use insulin less efficiently. Skipping breakfast—going without that morning meal can increase blood sugar after both lunch and dinner. Time of day—blood sugar can be harder to control the later it gets. Dawn phenomenon—people have a surge in hormones early in the morning whether they have diabetes or not. For people with diabetes, blood sugar can spike. Dehydration—less water in your body means a higher blood sugar concentration. Nose spray—some have chemicals that trigger your liver to make more blood sugar. Gum disease—it’s both a complication of diabetes and a blood sugar spiker. Watch out for other triggers that can make your blood sugar fall. For example, extreme heat can cause blood vessels to dilate, which makes insulin absorb more quickly and could lead to low blood sugar. If an activity or food or situation is new, be sure to check your blood sugar levels before and after to see how you respo Continue reading >>

Sunburn!!! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Sunburn!!! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Just got back from a weekend to a very sunny blackpool, had a fantastic time,BUT, didn't realise that it was sunny as was cloudy and didn't feel at all hot. Any to cut a long story short, i got sunburnt, shoulders across back of neck and down arms to elbow, jeeze its sooooo sore. But would gettin sunburn effect my blood sugars, have just managed to get them under better control, and an now averaging in the 6's, but since yesterday my sugars have gone up greatly, in the 10's at mostly every reading and wondered if the sunburn could be to blame as not eating any different, yes i did relax my diet a bit over the weekend, but would have thought my bloods would fluxuate, and not contatantly be high p.s. next time am goin abroad, never got sunburnt in my life before and i will admit today i have cried like a baby due to the pain!!!!. but the old remedy of strong cold tea really works!!! +1 on that. Sunburn can almost be considered another kind of trauma and your body will release a whole cocktail of things to try and deal. You may find that your sugars will runn high or that you need to increase your insulin slightly until it gets better. Last time I managed to burn myself well I tested a bit more often and just made sure I kept well hydrated. I found I had to do more correction doses with meals but it all settled down after a few days. Of course one thing to remember is warm days can change how quickly your body absorbs insulin and may increase its effects. SO we get back to keep testing Hope your sunburn heals up soon and you end up with a nice tan instead of it just falling off. Blackpool was great, better than i expected, i havn't been there since i was Continue reading >>

How Heat And Humidity May Affect Blood Sugar

How Heat And Humidity May Affect Blood Sugar

Hot weather does not directly alter blood glucose levels. However, sweltering temperatures affect our metabolism and the release of hormones. Heat and humidity influence how much and how fast we move, how much we perspire, blood circulation, the foods we want to eat, and the activities we choose to enjoy. Any of these factors, or a combination, might contribute to the experience of dehydration and blood sugar fluctuations. Six Steamy-Weather Influences We know when it is sizzling outside that we will sweat, and as the air wicks moisture from our skin the body cools. This cooling system works wonderfully as long as our body remains hydrated. If our body is low on fluids, the kidneys receive less blood flow and work less effectively. This might cause blood glucose concentrations to rise. If someone’s blood sugar is already running high in the heat, not only will they lose water through sweat but they might urinate more frequently too, depleting their body’s fluids even more. When the weather is tropical - hot and humid - the sweat on our skin cannot readily evaporate into the already soggy air. Our innate cooling system is less effective and the risk of heat exhaustion increases. Having poorly controlled or difficult-to-control blood sugar can inhibit some people’s ability to sweat. Without this effective natural cooling process, they are at higher risk for overheating—even when the humidity is not too high. While many diabetics notice higher blood sugar in hot weather, some individuals need less insulin when the weather turns significantly warmer. Although science has not figured out why this occurs, it may be owed to the dilation or widening of small blood vessels in hot temps. As these tiny blood vessels dilate, the body’s delivery system becomes more efficie Continue reading >>

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here. twitter summary: Adam identifies at least 22 things that affect blood glucose, including food, medication, activity, biological, & environmental factors. short summary: As patients, we tend to blame ourselves for out of range blood sugars – after all, the equation to “good diabetes management” is supposedly simple (eating, exercise, medication). But have you ever done everything right and still had a glucose that was too high or too low? In this article, I look into the wide variety of things that can actually affect blood glucose - at least 22! – including food, medication, activity, and both biological and environmental factors. The bottom line is that diabetes is very complicated, and for even the most educated and diligent patients, it’s nearly impossible to keep track of everything that affects blood glucose. So when you see an out-of-range glucose value, don’t judge yourself – use it as information to make better decisions. As a patient, I always fall into the trap of thinking I’m at fault for out of range blood sugars. By taking my medication, monitoring my blood glucose, watching what I eat, and exercising, I would like to have perfect in-range values all the time. But after 13 years of type 1 diabetes, I’ve learned it’s just not that simple. There are all kinds of factors that affect blood glucose, many of which are impossible to control, remember, or even account for. Based on personal experience, conversations with experts, and scientific research, here’s a non-exhaustive list of 22 factors that can affect blood glucose. They are separated into five areas – Food, Medication, Activity, Biological factors, and Environmental factors. I’ve provided arrows to show the ge Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In The Heat

Managing Diabetes In The Heat

How to keep your cool during the hottest time of year. Did you know that people who have diabetes—both type 1 and type 2—feel the heat more than people who don’t have diabetes? Some reasons why: Certain diabetes complications, such as damage to blood vessels and nerves, can affect your sweat glands so your body can’t cool as effectively. That can lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke, which is a medical emergency. People with diabetes get dehydrated (lose too much water from their bodies) more quickly. Not drinking enough liquids can raise blood sugar, and high blood sugar can make you urinate more, causing dehydration. Some commonly used medicines like diuretics (“water pills” to treat high blood pressure) can dehydrate you, too. High temperatures can change how your body uses insulin. You may need to test your blood sugar more often and adjust your insulin dose and what you eat and drink. Drink plenty of water. Test your blood sugar often. Keep medicines, supplies, and equipment out of the heat. Stay inside in air-conditioning when it’s hottest. Wear loose, light clothing. Make a plan in case you lose power. Have a go-bag ready for emergencies. It’s the Heat and the Humidity Even when it doesn’t seem very hot outside, the combination of heat and humidity (moisture in the air) can be dangerous. When sweat evaporates (dries) on your skin, it removes heat and cools you. It’s harder to stay cool in high humidity because sweat can’t evaporate as well. Whether you’re working out or just hanging out, it’s a good idea to check the heat index—a measurement that combines temperature and humidity. Take steps to stay cool (see sidebar) when it reaches 80°F in the shade with 40% humidity or above. Important to know: The heat index can be up to 15°F Continue reading >>

Heat And Diabetes

Heat And Diabetes

Living with diabetes blog Diabetes research is turning up new information on diabetes and diabetes management all the time. In 2009, I wrote a blog about the effects of heat on blood glucose control if you have diabetes. I mentioned, then, that heat doesn't have a direct effect on your blood glucose, but that heat can lead to changes in your daily routine which, in turn, can affect your blood glucose. Later research, published in September 2010 by researchers at Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz., suggests, additionally, that some Arizonans with diabetes have considerable gaps in their "heat awareness." This lack of awareness led to actions such as waiting until temperatures were quite high (above 101 F, or 38.3 C) before taking precautions against the heat and leaving medications and supplies at home rather than risk exposing them to the heat — meaning not having the supplies to manage diabetes while away from home. Sweating is an important means of cooling the body in hot weather, and the ability to sweat can be affected in some people with diabetes. Other studies have shown an increase in emergency room visits, in those who have diabetes, when temperatures are high. Diabetes equipment and medications can also be affected by heat. Tips for managing diabetes in warm temperatures remain the same: Avoid sunburn, it can stress your body and can raise your blood glucose. Wear a good sunscreen, sunglasses and hat when out in the sun. Drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration. Carry a bottle of water with you on walks, etc. Exercise and do more strenuous activities in the early or later hours of the day when the temperatures are cooler and the sun is not at its peak. Check blood sugar levels frequently, since they may fluctuate. Remember, extreme temperature changes can have Continue reading >>

Can Sunburn Raise Blood Sugar?

Can Sunburn Raise Blood Sugar?

Tweet With the warmer weather finally here, my wife and I headed to our community pool yesterday. It was an overcast day, with the sun only occasionally peeking through the clouds. I decided to forgo the sunscreen for most of the two hours we were there, eventually applying some to my shoulders an hour in. Needless to say, it doesn’t take bright sun to give you a burn, and today I woke up a bit sore and slightly pink all over my upper body. The strange part is that I tested my sugar both during the night and in the morning and it was much higher than normal (even after giving myself a correction bolus (dose of insulin) during the night. This led me to wonder, “Can sunburn raise my blood sugar level?” After doing a bit of research, I discovered that the simple answer is yes, sunburn can raise your blood sugar. Since I’m usually pretty good about applying sunscreen, this was something that hasn’t happened often enough in the nine years that I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for me to put two and two together. However, since my blood sugar is now under much tighter control than it used to be, it’s easier to recognize any unexpected deviations. Basically, what I discovered is that sunburn can stress your body and in turn raise your blood glucose just like other stresses to your body can. As for how long you can expect your blood glucose to be elevated, some Type 1s have experienced elevated blood sugars for several days after the initial burn, likely depending in part on its severity. I seem to have gotten mine under control within 24 hours, as it has stayed level since this afternoon. The effects of sunburn on blood glucose should not have come as a surprise to me since the same thing happens when Type 1s get sick, which is another form of stress on the body. Also, Continue reading >>

Sunburn And Diabetes?

Sunburn And Diabetes?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Yesterday I went walking with my younger brother, and a friend, same age as me. We all walked the same amount, had the same amount of exposure to the sun, and yet either one of them got sun, while I am so burn it hurts to move my upper body. I do have rather fair skin, but so does my little brother. He didn't get burnt at all. So what I was wondering is, if there is ANY connection at all between my sunburn and my diabetes? Does my having T1 make me more sensitive to the sun? I know it makes my immune system not as strong thats why I ask. Also... any tips to make it hurt less? Eri has never really had a probem w/ sunburn...although all my kids have really great tanning skin(Sicilian/Irish/Spanish/German)...so she is usually brown as a berry.(Ok, when we lived in FL anyway!!!) Never any worse off than either her brother or sister. I am a red head, and seeing sunlight burns me to a crisp. J/k on that, but I do burn extremely easily just from being a red head with extremely fair skin. I have never heard of any relationship between diabetes and sun burn, it could just be the pigment in your skin and who has more. Being one that just avoids sun, I can't really help on preventing it but just recommend Aloe Vera to help sooth it. Well, I'm not a red head (Not that, it's a bad thing!) I'm naturally extremely light brown/blond (dyed it medium to dark brown) and I have EXTREMELY fair skin, and never gave it a thought. I was too excited, I was putting in job applications for the first time, and I usually wear rather baggy shirts, but I needed to prove a point and show off the fact that I had lost a total Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Proper care, awareness crucial to maintaining healthy skin Skin is the largest organ in your body. Many people with diabetes are more likely to develop skin problems. While some are minor and mainly cosmetic, others can be fatal. “Diabetes tends to dry out the skin as part of the disease process,” said Jeffrey Meffert, MD, program director, dermatology at University Health System’s Diabetes Institute in San Antonio, Texas. “Some of the medications used can make the problem worse.” When blood sugar is high the body loses fluid, causing the skin to become dry. Dry skin in diabetes is related to damage to the nerves that cause sweating, the body’s main lubricating system. Dry skin and infections Dry skin can lead to many major concerns in diabetes. Cracking and peeling results in openings in the skin, allowing bacteria or fungi to enter the body. High levels of sugar in the body are great breeding grounds and reduce your body’s ability to heal itself, increasing the chances an infection may spread. Several different kinds of bacterial infections occur more often in people with diabetes. Among these are: • styes in the glands of the eyelids; • boils; • folliculitis of the hair follicles; • carbuncles — very deep infections of the skin and underlying tissue; and • infections around the nails. “With bacterial infections, you most often first see a redness around the area of the cut or crack,” said Matthew G. Garoufalis, DPM, a podiatrist in private practice in Chicago. “People with diabetes are at a disadvantage because they often will not feel pain, which can be an early warning that an infection is occurring. As it progresses, you may also see drainage from the wound, and it may become warm to the touch.” Fungal infections also are a concer Continue reading >>

Sun Exposure And Diabetes

Sun Exposure And Diabetes

Member I have type 1 diabetes since I was 11. I have been Sunburned through out most of my body parts because I went out with my friends to go swimming. I been out for hours and I did try to reapply sunscreen on. But I got burned anyways. How dangerous is Sunburns and Sun Poisoning to my diabetes? I been checking my blood sugar because pain does raise it. But is there anything I should watch out for? D.D. Family T1 for 54 years - on Pump since 03/2008 I would put lots of aftersun lotion on, and drink tons of water. Getting sunburnt doesn't do anything to your sugars. I find myself much more susceptible to sun exposure. I'm not sure if it is the diabetes, the meds or my age. I am very fair and have to apply 70-100 SPF every few hours. I also try to avoid the sun between 11 am - 5 pm when it is the strongest. If you are swimming, especially in salt water make sure you reapply sunscreen and be careful about lying on beach. If you are fair you may need to cover up at the beach. I always take a couple of asprin when I come in from the beach if I think I have gotten too much sun, it helps with the inflammation. As always check your bgs often. I am relatively new to T1 so I need a little help. I just moved to Florida and find that when I am outside even for short periods of time I get extremely light headed and come close to fainting. Is this from my diabetes? I do not have high blood pressure but I am on a Statin drug in addition to Insulin. I am almost afraid to leave the house. Does anyone have a similar problem? Or a solution? I can get light headed if my bs is low do you check then. Also if you get dehyradted it might feel weird so keep fluids going this is the hottest summer on record. Continue reading >>

Dose Insulin Make You More Likely To Get A Sunburn?

Dose Insulin Make You More Likely To Get A Sunburn?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Dose insulin make you more likely to get a sunburn? I was never told that - Is that in the fine print that I should have read from the pharmacy? I have NEVER heard that about insulin. I think that there are some type 2 medications in the form of pills that make it easier to sunburn, but not insulin. Carson has never gotten a sunburn, so I can't imagine that's true for him!!! Very weird. I think once again the media has said insulin rather than the actual drug this person is taking. There are some drugs used for T2's that do cause a sensitivity to sunlight. I have read the inserts on insulin front and back and nowhere has it said this, plus the fact that I've been on it for 27+ years and have in no way been more sensitive to the sun. If I'm wrong, someone point me in the right direction please. The only thing is that exposing your insulin to high heat may lessen its effectiveness. Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

We often look forward to changes of season, but if you have diabetes , you need to be extra careful when temperatures climb dramatically. Extreme heat can affect your blood sugar control. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If you use insulin or if your treatment of blood sugars is inadequate, this can put you at higher risk. Often, worsening blood sugar control is the main concern. Depending on the situation and your level of physical activity, low blood sugars are also possible. Extreme temperatures can also damage your medications and testing equipment. I always remind my patients to take precautions to protect themselves and their supplies during both winter and summer. If a patient’s blood sugars are mostly higher than 250 mg/dl, I recommend improving blood sugar control before engaging in heavy physical activity — regardless of the climate and the temperature, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. The extreme heat of summer affects blood sugar levels. How the heat affects your levels depends on what you’ve eaten, whether you’re well-hydrated and your activity level. If the heat and your activity make you sweat profusely, you may become dehydrated, leading to a rise in glucose levels. If you become dehydrated, your blood glucose levels will rise. This can lead to frequent urination, which then leads to further dehydration and even higher blood sugar levels — a kind of vicious cycle. Further, if the treatment includes insulin, dehydration reduces blood supply to the skin and, therefore, less absorption of injected insulin dosage. Most types of insulin can tolerate temperatures from 93 degrees F to 95 d Continue reading >>

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