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Does Sugar Cause Diabetes

Can You Become Type Ii Diabetic By Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Become Type Ii Diabetic By Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar and diabetes have more associations than not H ow much sugar can you consume if you have diabetes? A common question, but not so easy to be answered. We cannot say that sugar is responsible for causing diabetes. But we can surely say, sugar is more involved with diabetes then many would like to think. There are a lot of myth lists on the Internet saying: “Sugar does not cause diabetes”. But there is also another myth that says “sugar causes diabetes” both are false and true. Confused yet? Its not sugar that cause diabetes but our overproduction of insulin that does. Specially coming from high fructose foods – sugar happens to be the highest fructose food of all (if we can call it food). So, the short answer is no. If you have diabetes you shouldn’t eat any sugar at all. At least until you achieve some control and bring your body to stability. Is like saying cigarettes don’t cause cancer; its the smoke that does. Sugar will surely spike your blood glucose like no other food. It will make your pancreas release too much insulin leading to insulin resistance and a series of other complications. That alone has significance in diabetes. In a way sugar is like adding insult to injury when it comes to diabetes. But all carbohydrates do essentially the same. “The defining feature of diabetes is too much glucose” Table sugar is not the only sugar that you might be exposed to. All carbohydrates and specially refined grains have the same effect as sugar when consumed. Many people, including diabetics are eating huge quantities of carbohydrates without realizing the health implications that could bring in the long run. We don’t need to eat so many carbohydrates. We can eat more fats and proteins. Diabetes is caused by our excess carbohydrate intake. Sugar i Continue reading >>

Can Consuming Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Can Consuming Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Independently of quantity, consuming sugar (i.e., sucrose) does not cause diabetes. Understand why: “Since the first doctor noticed, hundreds of years ago, that the urine of a diabetic patient tasted sweet, it has been common to call the condition the sugar disease, or sugar diabetes, and since nothing was known about physiological chemistry, it was commonly believed that eating too much sugar had to be the cause, since the ability of the body to convert the protein in tissues into sugar wasn’t discovered until 1848, by Claude Bernard (who realized that diabetics lost more sugar than they took in). Even though patients continued to pass sugar in their urine until they died, despite the elimination of sugar from their diet, medical policy required that they be restrained to keep them from eating sugar. That prescientific medical belief, that eating sugar causes diabetes, is still held by a very large number, probably the majority, of physicians.” “In an earlier newsletter, I wrote about P. A. Piorry in Paris, in 1864, and Dr. William Budd in England, in 1867, who treated diabetes by adding a large amount of ordinary sugar, sucrose, to the patient's diet. Glucose was known to be the sugar appearing in the diabetics' urine, but sucrose consists of half glucose, and half fructose. In 1874, E. Kulz in Germany reported that diabetics could assimilate fructose better than glucose. In the next decades there were several more reports on the benefits of feeding fructose, including the reduction of glucose in the urine. With the discovery of insulin in 1922, fructose therapy was practically forgotten, until the 1950s when new manufacturing techniques began to make it economical to use.” “On a normal diet, his weight was 152 pounds, and his metabolic rate was from 9% to Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. Because blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, a common notion has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. The American Diabetes Association and Diabetes UK have labeled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center, which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Sugar can play an aiding and abetting role in diabetes, but the idea that “eating sugar causes diabetes” is simplistic and interferes with efforts to help the public understand the actual causes of the disease and how to protect themselves and their families. Here is what you need to know: The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it, you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort Continue reading >>

Q: Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Q: Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Q: Can eating too much sugar cause diabetes? Not in the same smoking-gun way that cigarettes cause cancer, but research shows that sugar may play a part--and it's smart to limit your intake. First and foremost, being overweight does increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and consuming too much sugar (especially when coupled with little to no physical activity) can contribute to weight gain. Excess body fat seems to trigger the release of certain proteins from fat cells that mess with the secretion of insulin (a hormone that metabolizes blood sugar and keeps it at healthy levels), according to a 2009 Cell Metabolism study. This may eventually overwork the pancreas and increase blood sugar, leading to type 2 diabetes. But some emerging research suggests that excess sugar intake can increase diabetes risk regardless of weight. A landmark JAMA study found that women nearly doubled their diabetes risk when they increased the number of sugar-added drinks they consumed from 1 or fewer a week to 1 or more per day over a 4-year period. Rapidly absorbed sugars--like those in colas--may damage the pancreas cells that secrete insulin. In contrast, real-fruit drinks were not associated with increased diabetes risk, perhaps because of the other nutrients absorbed along with the sugar. Bottom line: To be safe, keep your weight at a healthy level; eat plenty of high-fiber foods (like veggies and whole grains), which keep blood sugar and insulin levels steady; and choose water or tea instead of sugary soft drinks whenever possible. --Stephanie Woodard Source: Frank B. Hu, MD, PhD, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health Continue reading >>

Can Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Can Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

When you add up the amount of added sugar in one's diet, it comes out to equal about a child's weight in sugar every year, and with the clients I have worked with who are adults, about 150 pounds a year. Our pancreas is not designed to handle that tremendous load of sugar and will over time konk out, and/or our cells will have a hard time, too, thus leading to type 2 diabetes. If you want to know how much added sugar is in your diet try this added sugar calculator; it will add up how much added sugar you consume in a day and year. This is more complicated then it sounds! Type 2 diabetes can come from complications of being overweight. Obesity and overweight can come from ingesting too many calories on a regular basis. Too many refined carbohydrates, like sugar, can technically accelerate the process leading to insulin resistance. An optimal weight, a healthy diet, and regular exercise is your best defense against developing diabetes. Indirectly eating too much sugar may result in obesity which can lead to insulin resistance and type two diabetes. Long-term healthy weight maintenance for vitality and to prevent chronic disease is best achieved with a steady nutrient dense diet plan including whole grains, fruits, vegetables, healthy fats such as olive oil, proteins including lean meat, nuts, legumes, beans, soy or dairy and reduced saturated fat, sodium and sugar. Strive for physical activity daily in which you break a sweat for at least 30 minutes. If you are unsure if you are healthy enough for exercise, check with your doctor. As a rule you should be able to talk while you walk. If you are out of breath and unable to talk while exercising, decrease the intensity. This is a common misconception. There are several types of diabetes, and none of them is a direct result o Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Headaches?

Does Sugar Cause Headaches?

Sugar is a vital component of your body chemistry. Too much or too little sugar can cause problems, including headaches. This is because sugar has a direct effect on your brain and nervous system. Learning how to maintain a proper level of sugar in your diet may prevent future headaches. If you have persistent headaches related to sugar, you should talk to your doctor. Headaches caused by sugar have a lot to do with your blood glucose level. Glucose gives your body energy by entering your blood stream after you consume sugar. Your body maintains a proper blood sugar level by breaking down glucose with insulin. Fluctuations in your glucose level affect your brain more than any other organ. These rises and drops can result in a headache. The headaches caused by glucose and your brain are also related to hormones activated by sugar levels. How much sugar do you need? It’s increasingly difficult to manage a proper sugar intake. Americans eat far more sugar than they should on average. The American Heart Association recommends women consume no more than six teaspoons of sugar a day and men consume no more than nine teaspoons. This is in sharp contrast to what Americans actually consume, which is 22 teaspoons for adults and 34 teaspoons for children daily. Learn more: America’s deadly sugar addiction has reached epidemic levels » In general, you should maintain a blood sugar level between 70–120 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). This number may change if you have diabetes or another health condition. Always follow your doctor’s recommendations about blood sugar levels. Consuming a lot of sugar or not consuming enough may cause an occasional sugar-related headache. Some conditions, like diabetes, may also make you more likely to experience sugar-related headaches. Tha Continue reading >>

Sugars And Type 2 Diabetes

Sugars And Type 2 Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person’s blood sugar to be too high. There are two forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2 [1]. Insulin is a hormone that is key in regulating blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes can occur either as a result of insulin receptors becoming desensitised and as a result no longer responding to insulin; or, due to the beta cells of the pancreas no longer producing insulin. Often it is a combination of these two factors that leads to this condition known as type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common type – of all the adults who have diabetes, 90% of them have type 2. Diabetes is an increasing health problem in the UK with 3.2million people diagnosed with diabetes and a further 850,000 estimated to be undiagnosed [1]. Diabetes is a growing health burden and it is estimated that by 2025, 5 million people will have been diagnosed in the UK [2]. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in the UK and the disease’s complications cause more than 100 amputations to take place each week. Each year, 24 000 people die early from diabetes-associated complications [3]. Its total cost is estimated at £13.8billion each year [4]. It is predicted that the annual NHS cost of the direct treatment of diabetes in the UK will increase to £16.9 billion over the next 25 years, which is 17 per cent of the NHS budget [5], believed to potentially bankrupt the NHS What are the causes of Type 2 diabetes? There is a complex combination of genetic and environmental risk factors that play a part in the development of diabetes – it tends to cluster in families, but there is also a strong link to environmental risk factors. Ethnicity also plays a major role in its development, with people of South Asian descent Continue reading >>

Does Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

You’ve heard the joke a million times. And with Christmas around the corner, you’re bound to hear it a whole lot more: “With all those sweets, you’re going to give us all diabetes!” It’s funny, but most people do assume there’s at least a hint of truth to it. Is eating sweets today going to give me diabetes tomorrow? We all know diabetes is linked to high levels of blood sugar, so it may seem logical to assume that overdosing on the sweet stuff is why so many people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. But of course, it’s not that simple. Diabetes, By The Numbers Diabetes does not have one cause, per se. It happens when your body is not able to make enough insulin or effectively use the insulin it has. This can happen for a couple of different reasons. In people with type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Without insulin, the body isn’t able to use glucose as fuel, and blood sugars rise to dangerous levels. For people with type 2 diabetes, muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. Without insulin telling the cells to let glucose in, blood sugars remain high and cells aren’t able to get the fuel they need to function properly. The Things you Can Control Of course, type 1 diabetes is due to factors we can’t control, like our genes and some viruses. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is due to a mix of things we can and can’t control. While we can’t do anything about our genes, our age or our ethnicity, we can control our weight, our diet and how physically active we are. Now to the sugar: Although excessive sugar intake is not a direct cause of type 2 diabetes, excess calories lead to weight gain, which increases your diabetes risk. And since added sugars are one of the largest sources of Continue reading >>

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst and urination increased hunger fatigue blurred vision numbness or tingling in the feet or hands sores that do not heal unexplained weight loss Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can start quickly, in a matter of weeks. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly—over the course of several years—and can be so mild that you might not even notice them. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Some people do not find out they have the disease until they have diabetes-related health problems, such as blurred vision or heart trouble. What causes type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when your immune system, the body’s system for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Scientists think type 1 diabetes is caused by genes and environmental factors, such as viruses, that might trigger the disease. Studies such as TrialNet are working to pinpoint causes of type 1 diabetes and possible ways to prevent or slow the disease. What causes type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of diabetes—is caused by several factors, including lifestyle factors and genes. Overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are not physically active and are overweight or obese. Extra weight sometimes causes insulin resistance and is common in people with type 2 diabetes. The location of body fat also makes a difference. Extra belly fat is linked to insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and heart and blood vessel disease. To see if your weight puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes, check out these Body Mass Index (BMI) charts. Insulin resistance Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resista Continue reading >>

The Truth About ‘what The Health’ Claim “sugar Doesn’t Cause Diabetes”

The Truth About ‘what The Health’ Claim “sugar Doesn’t Cause Diabetes”

Earlier this year, pro-vegan documentary What The Health was released on Netflix. The film, which explores the credibility of large health organisations’ advice on nutrition, has received a lot of attention from both supporters and critics alike. Many people have attributed their change to a plant-based diet to the documentary including singer-songwriter Ne-Yo. However, one claim made in the film has been picked up by critics in an attempt to discredit the documentary as a whole: that sugar does not directly cause type 2 diabetes. For years now we have associated diabetes with an excess of sugar in a person’s diet. Diabetes is indeed the body’s inability to manage glucose levels in the blood but does this mean that sugar causes type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where a person’s pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin (type 1 diabetes), or if it does the body can’t use insulin in the way it is supposed to (type 2 diabetes). Insulin is what allows glucose to pass from our blood into our muscle cells and therefore allows the body to use glucose as energy. When glucose can’t access the muscle cells, blood sugar levels rise. In type 2 diabetes, insulin is present but doesn’t work properly, this is called insulin resistance. This occurs when there is a build up of fat in muscle cells, this then stops your body’s signalling process that tells insulin it needs to allow glucose into the muscle cells. There are studies that back this up. Nearly a century ago the blood sugar levels of two groups of volunteers were monitored after they ate. One group ate meals high in fat, the other diets rich in carbohydrates. The group who were eating a fat rich diet experienced much larger spikes in their blood sugar after eating than the group who were fed carbohydrates Continue reading >>

Quantity Of Sugar In Food Supply Linked To Diabetes Rates, Researcher Says

Quantity Of Sugar In Food Supply Linked To Diabetes Rates, Researcher Says

2013 Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? For years, scientists have said “not exactly.” Eating too much of any food, including sugar, can cause you to gain weight; it’s the resulting obesity that predisposes people to diabetes, according to the prevailing theory. But now the results of a large epidemiological study suggest sugar may also have a direct, independent link to diabetes. Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine, the University of California-Berkeley and the University of California-San Francisco examined data on sugar availability and diabetes rates from 175 countries over the past decade. After accounting for obesity and a large array of other factors, the researchers found that increased sugar in a population’s food supply was linked to higher diabetes rates, independent of obesity rates. Their study was published Feb. 27 in PLOS ONE. “It was quite a surprise,” said Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center and the study’s lead author. The research was conducted while Basu was a medical resident at UCSF. The study provides the first large-scale, population-based evidence for the idea that not all calories are equal from a diabetes-risk standpoint, Basu said. “We’re not diminishing the importance of obesity at all, but these data suggest that at a population level there are additional factors that contribute to diabetes risk besides obesity and total calorie intake, and that sugar appears to play a prominent role.” Specifically, more sugar was correlated with more diabetes: For every additional 150 calories of sugar available per person per day, the prevalence of diabetes in the population rose 1 percent, even after controlling for obesity, physical activi Continue reading >>

Does The Sugar In Coca-cola Cause Diabetes?

Does The Sugar In Coca-cola Cause Diabetes?

Being overweight or obese is a major risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. Eating and drinking too many calories, including from soft drinks, can contribute to weight gain, which in turn increases the risk of diabetes. A balanced lifestyle is key to successful weight management. Like all food and drink, soft drinks with sugar can be consumed in moderation as long as people don’t consume them to excess. For those who want to reduce their calorie and sugar intake, we offer a variety of great-tasting drinks with reduced, low or no sugar and calories, like Diet Coke, Coca-Cola Zero Sugar, Fanta Zero and Sprite Zero. It’s also why we offer many of our drinks in small pack sizes. We provide information on how much sugar and how many calories are in our beverages, so people can choose what makes sense for them and their families. We recommend that anyone concerned about the risk of diabetes contact their doctor. For further information, take a look Diabetes UK. Continue reading >>

Does Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

5 Ways to Beat Bad Breath Why Orgasms Feel Good WebMD Expert Answers: Is sugar the enemy? Where does/can it fit in the diet of someone with diabetes? Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder associated with a blood sugar level that is too high. Diabetes mellitus type I and II are the main variants of this disorder that may have a number of different causes and take on a number of different forms. Type I diabetes can be triggered by viral infections or an overreaction by the immune system as a result of which the pancreas reduces or stops the production of insulin. This prevents blood being transported in the blood stream from entering cells in the body and makes an insulin injection necessary. Type II diabetes, also known as maturity-onset diabetes and the form of the disorder which affects around 90% of sufferers, involves disruption to the secretion and efficacy of the insulin. This leads to blood sugar concentrations after meals that are higher for longer periods of time than usual. This in turn can culminate in damage to important organs. Overweight and adipositas are major causes of type II diabetes. Therefore diabetes is not caused by sugar. It is a disorder caused by the body’s inability to regulate the concentration of sugar in the bloodstream. Diabetics have traditionally been told to avoid the consumption of sugar. New findings, however, suggest that it is possible to provide up to 10% of the body’s total energy requirements in the form of sugar. Nonetheless, this should always be discussed with the patient’s doctor. Continue reading >>

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