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Does Spaghetti Squash Raise Blood Sugar

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

Forget what you've been tolda diabetes diagnosis does not mean you've been sentenced to a life without carbs. Well, doughnuts may be off the list, but the right carbs can and should be part of a balanced diet for everyone, explains Anna Taylor, RD, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. In fact, for those with (type 1 or 2) diabetes, getting enough good-for-you carbs is essential for keeping blood sugar levels under control. The key is to pick carb-containing foods that are also rich in fiber and/or protein, nutrients that actually slow the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, resulting in a more gradual rise and fall of blood sugar levels. Here are Taylor's top 10 diabetes-friendly carb picks, all of which pack additional nutrients that can help prevent chronic conditions or diabetes complications down the line. Lentils and beans are excellent sources of protein and fiber. The 19 grams of carbs from a half cup serving of cooked lentils come with 9 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber (3 grams per serving is considered a "good" source of fiber; 5 and up is considered an "excellent" source, per FDA guidelines). One thing to note: You get the same benefits from canned beans as you do from cooked, dried beansbut you may want to rinse them first, which can eliminate more than 40% of the sodium.(Diabetes doesn't have to be your fate; Rodale's new book, The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes , shows you exactly what to eat and do to prevent the diseaseand even reverse it.) Black-eyed, split, and classic green peas have protein and fiber benefits similar to those of beans and lentils. One cup of green peas (before cooking) packs 8 grams of protein, 7 grams of fiber, and 21 grams of carbohydrates. Bonus: They have more than 20% of your daily value of vitamin K, manganese Continue reading >>

How To Make Instant Pot Spaghetti Squash

How To Make Instant Pot Spaghetti Squash

Home Recipes How to Make Instant Pot Spaghetti Squash (in Just 15 Minutes!) How to Make Instant Pot Spaghetti Squash (in Just 15 Minutes!) Set your timer! This Instant Pot recipe cooks up an entire spaghetti squash to tender perfection in just 15 minutes. With its delicate strands of angel hair noodles, its no wonder the spaghetti squash is a popular pasta alternative. Its crunchy, sweet, and compliments both savory and sweet flavors. While it can be a hassle to slice a large spaghetti squash in half to roast for nearly an hour, this easy Instant Pot recipe steams the entire squash for an easy-to-cook method thats ready in under 20 minutes. Try tossing the finished noodles in a fresh pesto or creamy casserole for a hearty meal, or mix with your favorite Paleo sauce and meatballs for an easy twist on Italian night. However you choose to prepare them, you can feel good serving these gluten-free noodles to your family. Spaghetti squash contains lots of potassium, folate, and beta-carotene to help lower blood sugar and boost cardiovascular health. Trying to figure out exactly what to eat on Paleo? Look no further than our FREE 21 Day Paleo Meal Plan. Grab Our FREE Paleo Meal Plan By Clicking Here! To cook the squash, place it whole on a trivet in your Instant Pot and add two cups of water. Tip: Be sure to choose a squash that is small enough to fit inside your Instant Pot! Secure the lid, close the vent valve, and manually set on high pressure for 15 minutes. Once the timer goes off, allow the pressure to escape and turn the vent valve to release any additional pressure before unlocking the lid. Carefully remove the squash using tongs and transfer to a cutting board to slice it in half and remove the seeds. You can save the seeds to roast later with sea salt and spices for Continue reading >>

Healthy Carbs For Diabetes

Healthy Carbs For Diabetes

1 / 9 Making the Best Carb Choices for Diabetes "When you say 'carbohydrate,' most people think of sugar," says Meredith Nguyen, RD, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at the Methodist Charlton Medical Center Diabetes Self-Management Program in Dallas. But that's only half the story. Carbohydrates are also starches and valuable fiber, which are found in many nutrient-rich foods that should be part of a diabetes diet. Sugar is the basic building block that, depending on how it's organized, creates either starches or fiber. You need about 135 grams of carbohydrates every day, spread fairly evenly throughout your meals. Instead of trying to avoid carbs completely, practice planning your diabetes diet with everything in moderation. "There's nothing you can't have," Nguyen says. "The catch is that you might not like the portion size or frequency." Use this list of healthy carbohydrates to help you stay balanced. Continue reading >>

6 Tips To Manage Type 2 Diabetes In 2011

6 Tips To Manage Type 2 Diabetes In 2011

Diabetes is prevalent in our society and so are carbohydrates. On numerous occasions Ive heard people say, I never met a carbohydrate I did not like. Lets face it, carbohydrates are easily accessible, usually inexpensive, tasty, they can be made into interesting and fancy concoctions, and sadly, they can be a addictive for some. One of my clients asked, how can someone who has type 2 diabetes be healthy, enjoy eating and feel full without breaking up with carbohydrates? Here are some tips to answer that question. Read labels or choose foods without labels If you pick up an apple or some green beans you wont find a label on them. Herein lies the clue that you are consuming a healthy unprocessed form of carbohydrates. Fruits and vegetables have built in fiber which slows the absorption of their sugar. This helps prevent the insulin spike and drop that is caused by eating refined carbohydrates. That spike and the subsequent drop in blood sugar levels is what causes a craving for more carbohydrates or food. If you do choose a carbohydrate with a label look at how many total carbohydrates are in a serving. The American Diabetes Association uses 15 grams of carbohydrate as one serving of carbohydrate, which is equal to a slice of bread. If you know this, you can look at how many total carbohydrates are in that particular food, and calculate how many slices of breads worth of carbohydrate you are consuming. For example, a typical container of juice can contain 2 servings and each serving could be 40 grams of carbohydrate. Since the container is 2 servings, drinking the entire container is 80 grams of carbohydrate or the equivalent of 5.3 slices of bread. Juice has no fiber so the result of consuming it will be a large spike in your blood sugar followed by a drop. And this is Continue reading >>

Fanatic Cook: Using Glycemic Index/glycemic Load To Control Blood Glucose

Fanatic Cook: Using Glycemic Index/glycemic Load To Control Blood Glucose

Using Glycemic Index/Glycemic Load to Control Blood Glucose The primary reason for my change to a lower-carbohydrate diet is to control my blood glucose (BG) and improve my insulin sensitivity, a choice resulting from my recent discovery that my sugars have been silently creeping up over the years. I know I'm succeeding when the number on my BG meter is in the low 100s after a meal. I'm not pursuing low-carb as a means to lose weight (although, given my experience, if it's weight loss you're after, you'd be throwing away a chance for success if you don't try this), manage my cholesterol (although, low-carb has been shown to increase HDL and lower triglycerides), or pay homage to a Paleolithic diet (thus, I continue to eat the dark meat on poultry, fatty cuts of meat, cheeses, green beans, peas, peanuts and peanut oil, lentils, soy nuts, corn-on-the-cob, pickles, vinegars, and other foods deemed unacceptable on the Paleo Diet). The total carbohydrate in a serving of food (quantity). The tendency of that carbohydrate to raise my blood glucose, as measured by its glycemic index (GI) (quality). Fats have very little effect on blood glucose. Proteins have a small effect. Carbohydrates have quite an impact. There are many types of carbohydrates. Sugars are short-chain or no-chain carbs. Starches are mid-to-long-chain carbs. Those long chains may be either straight (amylose), or branched (amylopectin). Some carbs, such as cellulose, are not digestible by human enzymes and thus are one constituent of "dietary fiber". These and other factors influence how fast a carbohydrate will raise blood sugar. Low GI foods do not raise blood sugar as fast or as high as higher GI foods. When you combine the effect of items 1 and 2 (quantity and quality) above, you define the glycemic load ( Continue reading >>

Recipes: Spaghetti Squash

Recipes: Spaghetti Squash

It’s hard to give up pasta. Many diabetics who don’t notice that their blood sugar levels spike too high when they eat pasta. What’s too high? In general, I’d say over 150 mg/dl (8.33 mmol/l) measured one hour after a meal, or over 130 mg/dl (7.22 mmol/l) two hours after the meal. Other experts disagree and propose other numbers. An alternative to spaghetti pasta that shouldn’t raise blood glucose levels as high is spaghetti squash. It’s all about the carbohydrates. A cup of cooked spaghetti squash has 10 g of carb; a cup of cooked spaghetti has 43 g. The fiber grams are about the same. Numbers are from FitDay.com. Spaghetti squash is a classic low-carb vegetable. If you’ve never tried it, you should. As vegetables go, it’s one of the largest, heaviest, and most interesting to prepare. Easy, too. The spaghetti squash season is autumn and winter in the northern hemisphere. Purchasing in spring and summer may be iffy. In my part of the world, supermarket spaghetti squashes weigh between two and five pounds. We cooked a three-pounder (1.4 kg) that yielded five cups; a five-pounder (2.3 kg) gave us 12 cups. A serving size is one, maybe two cups. What you don’t eat immediately stays fresh in the refrigerator for at least several days. Re-heat by microwaving or stir-frying. Like pasta and potatoes, the squash by itself is bland. It’s a great substrate for sauces or seasonings. Here’s how we cook it at the Parker Compound. Preheat the oven to 375º F 0r 190º C. Very carefully slice the squash in half lengthwise. Spoon out and discard the guts (seeds and membranes like a pumpkin; it even smells like a pumpkin). Put the halves flat-side down in a pan, then add a half inch (1.3 cm) of water to the pan. Cover with foil and bake until the outer shell (rind) i Continue reading >>

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

One of my favorite foods is pasta. I think I could eat pasta every day and never tire of it. And when I’ve had a rough day, nothing comforts me as much as a plate of pasta with butter (or trans-fat-free margarine), Parmesan cheese, and freshly ground black pepper. Yet pasta is much maligned in the diabetes world. I’ve noticed that people who have diabetes become very passionate when discussing this food. There’s the camp that is indignant at the idea that pasta even exists — it spikes up blood glucose, causes weight gain, and may just be responsible for global warming (OK, that’s an exaggeration). There’s another camp who still eats pasta, but feels horribly guilty for doing so, and will swear with their right hand in the air that, “I really only ate a half a cup” (and 99% of the time, it’s just not the case). I don’t mean to trivialize the subject. Pasta can be tricky to fit into one’s diabetes eating plan. But not because it sends blood glucose levels to the moon. My belief (and you’re welcome to disagree with me) is that most of us struggle with portion control. It’s been engrained in us that pasta is a main dish: that it should be piled high on the plate and smothered in red sauce, with a crusty, buttery slice of garlic bread resting on the side. This is where the problems come in. Here’s what I mean. Take a look at the calories and carbs in the pasta meal that I just mentioned: 3 cups of pasta: 135 grams of carbohydrate, 663 calories 1 cup of sauce: 30 grams of carbohydrate, 185 calories 1 slice of garlic bread: 24 grams of carbohydrate, 170 calories Total: 189 grams of carbohydrate, 1,018 calories If you dine in an Italian restaurant and manage to clean your plate, you’ll consume even more carbohydrate and calories. When you look at p Continue reading >>

Spaghetti Squash With Turkey Marinara - Type2diabetes.net

Spaghetti Squash With Turkey Marinara - Type2diabetes.net

Carefully slice spaghetti squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out seeds from the middle of the squash. Fill a 13 x 9 inch glass pan with about 1/2 inch of water and place squash, cut side down in water. Bake at 375F for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Remove from oven and allow to cool. In a large saucepan, over medium-high heat, brown the ground turkey. When turkey is partially browned about 5-7 minutes, add in the sliced mushrooms. Continue cooking until meat is no longer pink and mushrooms are tender. Pour marinara sauce over the meat and mushrooms. Lower heat to medium and add in the broccoli florets. Cover pan and allow sauce to gently simmer. Once cooled enough to handle, remove spaghetti squash halves from pan. Using a fork, scrape out all of the tender yellow squash from inside and transfer to a bowl. When meat sauce is heated through and broccoli is tender, remove from heat. Serve spaghetti squash topped with meat sauce and fresh basil leaves. Tips/Notes: There are many types of premade marinara sauces in the grocery store. Spend some time reading labels and choose one no added sugar ( Sign up for emails from Type2Diabetes.com: Continue reading >>

10 Diet Commandments For Better Diabetes Management

10 Diet Commandments For Better Diabetes Management

Twitter Summary: The ten diet commandments I follow for healthy eating w/ #diabetes + how to write your own & overcome obstacles A colorful, downloadable PDF of this article can be found here (convenient for printing!) The question – “What diet should I follow?” – has perhaps never been more confusing, more controversial, or more stressful. There are more diets, diet books, diet opinions, and news headlines than ever before. In reality, no single “diet” trumps them all, especially for people with diabetes – all approaches have their pros and cons, whether you’re talking about health effects (e.g., blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol), cost, convenience, or taste. So instead of a “diet,” I prefer to think about eating in terms of general strategies, or what this article is calling my “commandments.” After experimenting with many different eating approaches over the years, I’ve homed in on ten eating commandments that I strive to follow every day – these strategies seem to keep my blood sugars in range, give me plenty of energy, are transportable to different eating environments, are relatively convenient, and fit within my budget. Of course, eating preferences are highly personal (especially in diabetes), and my own principles may not apply for everyone. If you find this article useful, check out my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines! A Starting Point: Brainstorming Your Eating Commandments 1. When you see your best blood sugars (ideally 80-140 mg/dl) 90 minutes after a meal, what did you eat? How did you eat? When and where did you eat? How did you manage your diabetes around these times? 2. When you see higher blood sugars (over 200 mg/dl) 90 minutes after a meal, what did you eat? How did you eat? When and where did you eat? How d Continue reading >>

Foods That Don’t Raise Blood Sugar

Foods That Don’t Raise Blood Sugar

When you know about all the right foods that don’t raise your blood sugar—it can actually become very easy to keep your blood sugars in check. Certain foods will make your blood sugar go up quite rapidly. Also known as high-glycemic foods, these foods include sweets like candy, cakes, muffins, cupcakes, doughnuts, crackers, chips, French fries, pizza dough, wraps, white bread, white pasta, croissants, white rice, sugar, fruit juices like orange juice and apple juice, sweets, cookies, syrup, hamburger buns, rolls, bagels, oatmeal, corn, quinoa, couscous, macaroni and cheese, fettuccini, spaghetti, soda, and honey. You'll want to steer clear of those foods, so that your blood sugar levels stay nice and balanced. Once you add in more foods that don't raise your blood sugar, you won't miss those foods. Here is a list of foods that don't raise blood sugar. This is a list of diabetic-safe foods that are both healthy and delicious. Vegetables Artichoke hearts, Asparagus, Bamboo Shoots, Bean sprouts, Beets, Brussel sprouts, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Cucumber, Eggplant, Greens (collard, kale, mustard, turnip), Hearts of palm, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Mushrooms, Okra (not fried), Onions, Peppers (red, orange, yellow, green), Radishes, Rutabaga, Salad greens, Squash (summer, crookneck, spaghetti, zucchini), Sugar snap peas, Swiss chard, Turnips, and Water chestnuts. Proteins Greek yogurt, Cottage cheese, Eggs, Beef (steak, ground), Pork (chops, loin, ham), Chicken (breast, thigh), Turkey (breast, thigh), Fish (Tuna, halibut, Salmon, tilapia), Shrimp, Canadian bacon, Nuts (peanuts, almonds, cashews), Edamame (soybean), Tofu, and Low-carb protein powders. Fats Avocado, Almonds, Chia seeds, Vegetable Oil, Olive Oil, Flax seeds, Peanut butter (no sugar added), Cocon Continue reading >>

Pasta Substitutes Available For People With Diabetes

Pasta Substitutes Available For People With Diabetes

Pasta Substitutes Available for People With Diabetes Pasta Substitutes Available for People With Diabetes By Stacey Hugues | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Most of us love pastawhat's not to love? The soft textured noodles take on any flavor and give us a sense of comfort, but pasta is also loaded with carbohydrates, which, when eaten in excess, can increase inflammation, cause weight gain, and elevate blood sugars. If you must eat pasta, choose whole grain, such as whole wheat, because itwill help to increase your fiber, vitamins, and minerals and, if portion controlled, can possibly reduce how quickly blood sugars spike (when compared to white pasta). If on the other hand, you are willing to try some substitutes, think outside the box. Today, there are so many varieties of grains and grain substitutes. For example, did you know that they make a pasta with chickpeas? It's higher in protein and gluten-free. Other gluten-free varieties exist, and some pastas have added protein and omega-3 fatty acids. You can also make your own 'mock' pasta by using different types of grains or vegetables. Give some of these a tryyou'll be shocked by how many options you have. Whole Wheat, Fortified Pasta, and Gluten Free Alternatives Sian Irvine/Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images Surprisingly similar in texture to al dente white pasta,a 1/3 cup serving of cookedwhole wheat pastahas threetimes the amount of fiber as white pasta, making it a better option for glucose control. Fortified pasta varieties are another alternative to white pasta These pastas have been modified byadding a flour blend that includes egg whites and legumes for more protein; barley and oats for increasedfiber; and flaxseed for healthy omega-3 fats.These pastas contain 40 percent more protein and twice the fiber in Continue reading >>

Why Spaghetti Squash And Zucchini Noodles Are Nutritionally Superior To Pasta And Taste Better Too

Why Spaghetti Squash And Zucchini Noodles Are Nutritionally Superior To Pasta And Taste Better Too

Why Spaghetti Squash and Zucchini Noodles are Nutritionally Superior to Pasta and Taste Better Too With the rise in Type 2 diabetes and the increase in popularity of diets low in carbs and dense in nutrients and protein, more people are looking for options to replace their beloved pasta without having to give up on flavor. Its not difficult to see why spaghetti squash and zucchini noodles are nutritionally superior to pasta and taste better, too. A 2-ounce serving or about one cup of cooked angel hair pasta contains around 200 calories, 1 gram of fat, 7 grams of protein and a whopping 42 grams of carbohydrates, and thats before adding any sauce. Compare that to one cup of spaghetti squash which is only 31 calories, 0.6 gram of fat, 1 gram of protein, and only 7 grams of carbohydrates so it's much lower on the glycemic index than pasta and won't raise your blood sugar levels, yet contains vitamins and minerals. Spaghetti squash can be used as a substitute in any dish that typically uses pasta and it's low in saturated fat, and very low in cholesterol. This vegetable is also a good source of niacin, Vitamin B6, pantothenic acid, potassium and manganese, and a very good source of dietary fiber and Vitamin C. Zucchini contains 33 calories, 0.2 gram of fat, 6 grams of carbohydrates and 2.4 grams of protein and is low in Saturated Fat and Sodium, and very low in Cholesterol. Zucchini is a good source of protein, Vitamin A, thiamin, niacin, phosphorus and copper, and a very good source of dietary fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, riboflavin, Vitamin B6, folate, magnesium, potassium and manganese. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. and affects approximately 29.1 million Americans. Of those cases around 8.1 million cases are undiagnosed. Diabetes is a silent Continue reading >>

Surprising Spike From Spaghetti Squash

Surprising Spike From Spaghetti Squash

I had a healthy dinner last night that I assumed would be great for my glucose, but it wasn't. I went from 105 before the meal to 132 1.5 hours after. (that's a big spike for me.) Here's what I ate: approx 1 1/2 cups of spaghetti squash, 1/2 cup marinara sauce with 3 turkey meatballs and 1/2 cup of green beans. The sauce is from a jar but is low carb. The turkey meatballs have 1 gram of carb each. I just don't get why eating tons of veggies would spike me that much! Maybe I just ate too much? I'm just wondering if anyone else has had this happen when eating spaghetti squash. Sometimes it is hard to figure out exactly what in a meal caused a spike. It could have been the squash, sauce or the beans. I usually make my own sauce to avoid the added sugar in most jarred sauces. I do OK with most spaghetti squashes, winter squashes and zucchini. I notice your meal is fairly low fat, did you add any fat to the meal. I always use real organic butter with my Spaghetti squash. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. Sometimes it is hard to figure out exactly what in a meal caused a spike. It could have been the squash, sauce or the beans. I usually make my own sauce to avoid the added sugar in most jarred sauces. I do OK with most spaghetti squashes, winter squashes and zucchini. I notice your meal is fairly low fat, did you add any fat to the meal. I always use real organic butter with my Spaghetti squash. Good point about the fat, Jeanne. I' Continue reading >>

Glycemic Load

Glycemic Load

While the glycemic index (GI) serves as a good general guide for how foods affect blood sugar, it fails to take one aspect into consideration: amount. And that’s really important because it’s BOTH quality (the GI rating) and quantity (serving size) of carbohydrate that impacts blood sugar. Glycemic Load = Type of Carb + Amount of Carb While the glycemic index (GI) measures glycemic response after consuming a standard amount (50 grams) of carbohydrate from a particular food, the glycemic load (GL) ranks foods according to how much carbohydrate is in a regular serving of the food in question. And this is a really important consideration. Let’s put this into practice. Carrots have a high glycemic index of 68. But you would have to eat a bunch of carrots (literally!) to get to 50 grams of carbohydrate. And that’s pretty unlikely. (Glycemic Load of carrots is just 3) Pasta, on the other hand, has a relatively low glycemic index of 38. But 50-100 grams of carbohydrate are easy to reach in a single serving of spaghetti (especially if it’s a gigantic restaurant portion). (Glycemic Load of spaghetti is 14). Formula for Calculating Glycemic Load Here’s the formula for calculating Glycemic Load (GL): GL = (GI Value x Carbohydrate Per Serving) 100 Now you’re probably wondering – “What do these numbers mean?”… and “How can I ensure I’m eating a diet with a low glycemic load?” Glycemic Load: High, Medium & Low Just like the glycemic index, glycemic load is categoriezed as low, moderate and high. Low Glycemic Load = Less than 10 (has low glycemic impact) Moderate Glycemic Load = Between 10 and 20 (moderate effect on blood-sugar ) High Glycemic Load = Above 20 (spikes blood sugar levels) The Glycemic Load of Specific Foods Now let’s take a look at the glyc Continue reading >>

Low-carb Alternatives To Pasta

Low-carb Alternatives To Pasta

The fear of pasta deprivation is one of the things that turns people away from low-carb diets. If you think you can't live without spaghetti, macaroni, or ramen, fear not. There are many low-carb alternatives to pasta. There are some true hard-core pasta-lovers. These people would just as soon sit down to a serving of plain pasta as anything else. But for many people, plain pasta doesnt cut itits the sauces and toppings they want most. For them, pasta is mostly a vehicle for other flavors. If you are one of them, you can find a different vehicle to fill that role. If you eat regular pasta, be sure to cook it al dente , so it is slightly firm rather than soft. This reduces the amount the pasta will raise your blood sugar, which is known as the glycemic index. Many vegetables are bland enough to use as a blank canvas for pasta sauces, and most of them are far more nutritious than pasta. Spaghetti squash easily separates into spaghetti-like strands after cooking. It has less than a quarter of the calories and carbs of regular spaghetti (even whole wheat)and surpasses pasta in most nutrient categories. Its delicious with pesto and creamy sauces. It can also be used in casseroles, like turkey tetrazzini . If you've never cooked spaghetti squash before, have no fear; its easy. Other vegetables that serve as good beds for pasta sauces include: Zucchini or other summer squash, shredded, julienned, or cut into ribbons with a peeler. To make them even more noodle-like, try making zoodles with a spiralizer. Zoodles are great with pesto. Cauliflower rice can be grated, finely chopped, or processed in a food processor. Then steam it in the microwave, saute, or roast it before using it as you would use rice. Cabbage can be shredded and sauted to use as your base. Adding some sliced Continue reading >>

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