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Does Sauna Raise Blood Sugar

Hot Bath Beats Cycling For Lowering Blood Sugar Levels For Type 2 Diabetics

Hot Bath Beats Cycling For Lowering Blood Sugar Levels For Type 2 Diabetics

Hot bath beats cycling for lowering blood sugar levels for type 2 diabetics A hot bath can lower peak blood sugarCredit:Alamy A hotbath could be better than cycling at lowering blood sugar levels for type 2 diabetics , a study suggests. Dr Steve Faulkner of Loughborough Universityinvestigated whether there were any alternatives to exercise which could assist people in maintaining the condition. He found that a soak in the tub reduces peak blood sugar levels by 10 per cent more than an hour cycling, and increases energy expenditure levels by 80 per cent burning 126 calories per hour. Dr Faulkner, who is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate for the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit (BRU), said: We discovered the participants who bathed had, on average, 10 per cent lower peak glucose levels in comparison to the exercise, which was completely unexpected. The amount our blood sugar rises after a meal is one of the risk markers for things like developing type 2 diabetes, so keeping it down can be good for our health. We think the reason is that thebathmay encourage the release of heat shock proteins, which may help lower blood sugar levels by improving insulin controlled glucose uptake. However, although these findings are interesting, we would always encourage increased physical activity and exercise as the best way to maintain good health. A hot bath even beats cycling for lowering peak levelsCredit:AFP/Getty Images The experiment involved 10 unfit males, who all bathed in a (104F) 40C, while wearing a continuous glucose monitor to record changes in their blood sugar during the subsequent 24 hours. The same participants also cycled on a separate day at an intensity that increase Continue reading >>

Hot Tub Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Blood Sugar Levels & Improves Sleep

Hot Tub Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Blood Sugar Levels & Improves Sleep

Hot Tub Therapy has found to be useful in controlling Type 2 diabetes. Yes, you read that correctly. According to the American Diabetes Association, over 15.7 million Americans are diabetic. More people are being diagnosed as diabetic every day! Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90% of cases. It is a disorder in which the body is not able to make enough insulin or to properly use insulin to turn the glucose in food into energy. Having Type 2 Diabetes does not mean that it’s the end of the world. With a simple guide to managing Type 2 Diabetes, you can still live a healthy and happy life. Since November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, I thought it would be a good time to shine a spotlight on a serious disease that leads to potentially life-threatening complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and possible amputation. Studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine have given new hope to the millions who suffer from diabetes. “Hot tub therapy” helped a group of Type 2 diabetics reduce their blood sugar levels and improve sleep patterns. (If I had Type 2 diabetes, I”d take those improvements for starters, wouldn’t you?) Hot tubbing was judged beneficial because the effects of partial immersion in a hot tub simulate the beneficial effects of exercise. Physical exercise is recommended for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Soaking in a hot tub was found to be beneficial for Type 2 diabetes according to an independent study done by Dr. Philip L. Hooper at the McKee Medical Center in Loveland, Colorado. He studied a group of Type 2 diabetes patients for three weeks. The patients were required to soak in a hot tub for thirty minutes a day, six days a week, for the duration of the study Continue reading >>

Diabetics & Saunas | Healthy Living

Diabetics & Saunas | Healthy Living

There is a lot of mixed information regarding the use of saunas for diabetics. In all cases, diabetics should consult a doctor before using a sauna. Before doing so, however, it is a good idea to be informed of the benefits and concerns of saunas and diabetics. When the human body is exposed to the kind of intense heat produced by a sauna, the capillaries dilate, so the heart has to work harder to send blood to them. Because high blood pressure and other heart concerns are common for diabetics, it is clear to see the potential danger of saunas for diabetics. Additionally, saunas typically dehydrate the body by releasing sweat through the skins pores. This also poses a potential danger for diabetics. According to a 1980 study published by V.A. Koivisto in the "British Medical Journal," the rate of insulin delivery from the injection site affects the blood glucose concentration. Exercise accelerates insulin absorption, while rest can slow it. Because the blood flow in the skin is dependent on environmental temperature, the heat in saunas accelerates blood flow and, therefore, insulin absorption. Koivisto's study, which looked at diabetics in Finland who regularly take saunas, revealed that after the sauna, blood flow decreased, which slowed down insulin absorption. Infrared lighting has been shown to improve the condition of diabetic neuropathy. Infrared lighting reduces the numbing conditions and causes molecules of nitric oxide to be released from hemoglobin in the bloodstream, which, in turn, increases blood flow. This is particularly beneficial to diabetics who suffer from poor blood circulation to the feet and other extremities. Saunas with infrared lamps are also less hot than typical saunas, so the heart does not have to work so hard in these saunas to manage the Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Sauna?

Is It Safe To Sauna?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was diagnosed T1 about 6 months ago. I've got my head around it and have pretty good control, but then the odd issue crops up. I was at the gym and it was the first time in a long while that I have had time to take a Sauna after a swim - as I went to open the door I checked the notice (which I think I've never done before) and it read that people with diabetes should not use - not differentiating between T1 and T2, so I was unsure if this is an insulin/heat (potential hypo) issue? My DN recommended 10mins (max), should the opportunity arise again... but I just wandered if others used them and if there are any other issues to watch out for? Apologies if this is a ridiculous or simple question to answer. Any advice would be appreciated. I suppose the same 10 minutes holds for steam rooms? I don't think that 10 mins is particularly an issue. I'd suggest that you can go longer than that safely. Personally, from my experiences, I think it's a case of rather more worry than is necessary. I don't recall any news stories about diabetics being rescued from saunas due to hypos, and they would definitely get out there. Apparently the heat of the sauna's increases blood flow to the skin area which accelerates the rate in which insulin is absorbed, probably why they have a ban or a precautionary warning on sauna's. Makes sense, but how much insulin is on board when going into a sauna? Saunas are actually good for those with diabetes. I wouldn't recommend prolonged use, but they don actually increase blood circulation in the body, this, in turn, helps the body regulate insulin more effectively and so helps those with diabetes maintain a more regular blood sugar l Continue reading >>

Dry Sauna Heat Helps The Heart

Dry Sauna Heat Helps The Heart

Oct. 1, 2001 - Dry sauna baths help the heart the same way exercise does, Japanese researchers report. The findings don't mean you should become a baked couch potato. They instead hint at a new way you can reduce your risk of heart disease . It seems to help people at risk of heart disease : those who have high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels , those with diabetes , or those who smoke. It also seems to help people who already have heart problems. "We have seen many patients with severe heart failure whose clinical symptoms improved dramatically by repeated sauna therapy," lead study author Chuwa Tei, MD, tells WebMD. Tei says the research team has evidence that repeated sauna treatment improves the blood vessel and heart function of patients with chronic heart failure. "The effect of sauna is similar to exercise for patients with coronary risk factors," Tei says, adding that the advantage of sauna compared to exercise also is applicable to patients with walking disturbances or to patients who can't exercise because of heart failure. The dry sauna used in this "thermal therapy" is not as hot as the saunas normally used in Japan and in Europe, warns Tei, who leads the internal medicine department at Japan's Kagoshima University. The treatment uses a sauna set at 140 degrees Fahrenheit (60(C), whereas saunas in gyms and hotels often are set at 175-210 degrees Fahrenheit (80-100(C). Tei advises patients to use the low-heat sauna for 15 minutes a day, three to five times per week. After the sauna, patients rest under blankets for 30 minutes. In a study appearing in the current issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Tei and co-workers gave this sauna treatment to 25 men ranging in age from 25 to 51. Three of the men had diabetes ; eight had hig Continue reading >>

Infrared Sauna And Diabetes

Infrared Sauna And Diabetes

Diabetes , Health & Wellness , Infrared Sauna Benefits November 14 is World Diabetes Day. Recent estimates project that as many as 1 in 3 American adults will have diabetes in 2050. Did you know that many people with diabetes or at risk for diabetes use infrared therapy to support their health? In a study published in the June 2010 issue of the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Dr. Richard Beever, professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of British Columbia, found that infrared saunas help diabetics. Dr. Beever knew of data that showed that far-infrared sauna treatments improve the quality of life for those with chronic pain, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression and congestive heart failure. He wanted to determine whether far-infrared saunas have a beneficial effect on quality of life in those with type II diabetes as well. At the Fraser Lake Community Health Center in rural British Columbia, all patients with type II diabetes were invited to participate in a study consisting of 20-minute infrared sauna sessions three times a week for three months. The study used Sunlighten infrared saunas . Far-infrared sauna use may be associated with improved quality of life in people with type II diabetes mellitus, the research concluded. Uptake of infrared saunas use is greater than the uptake of other lifestyle interventions. Dr. Beever later told an interviewer, Generally, I would feel comfortable in recommending infrared saunas, but I am comfortable more particularly with Sunlighten , as I have done subsequent research examining the effects of their specific sauna and heating technology on quality of life, blood pressure, weight, cholesterol, sugar levels and in those with type 2 diabetes (another publication is pending). In the April 20 Continue reading >>

Can A Hot Bath Reduce Blood Sugar & Burn Calories?

Can A Hot Bath Reduce Blood Sugar & Burn Calories?

Can a Hot Bath Reduce Blood Sugar & Burn Calories? Is it possible to obtain the benefits of exercise, without exercising? While performing their normal daily activities, most people just don't get the same amount of exercise today, as people did a few hundred years ago. There are many people who would love to just take an "exercise pill" and obtain the same benefits as they would from going through a strenuous workout. That exercise pill doesn't yet exist and it may never will, but we can't rule out the possibility of that happening someday. Getting back to reality, there is however a trick that can be done today, to get some of the benefits of exercise without the effort. This "trick" is a procedure and not a pill. Recent research confirms that not only are more calories burned when your body temperature rises in a hot bath, but that hot bath also has a surprisingly beneficial effect on blood sugar levels. The researchers found that by sitting in a hot bath for an hour, energy expenditure increased by 80%. This didn't approach the energy expenditure from riding a bike for an hour, but it was extremely close to a that of a brisk 30-minute walk. Riding the bike burned 630 calories and the hot bath burned 140 calories in an hour. The second factor they evaluated was peak glucose output, or the rise in glucose in your blood after a meal. The two groups of participants ate a meal of similar composition. the first group did this a few of hours after their hour long hot bath and the second group, a few hours after exercising for an hour. A very high blood glucose level after a meal, is a risk marker for type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. If you don't have diabetes, your pancreas secretes small amounts of insulin throughout the day in response to the amount of blood gluc Continue reading >>

My Friend Is A Diabetic Can He Go In A Sauna Or A Hot Tub? | Yahoo Answers

My Friend Is A Diabetic Can He Go In A Sauna Or A Hot Tub? | Yahoo Answers

My friend is a diabetic can he go in a sauna or a hot tub? Yes, as long as he does not have high blood pressure. People with elevated blood pressure should avoid hot tubs and saunas. It raises the BP even more. HiIn point of fact heat can and does affect diabetes.I always run less sugary and thus need less insulin in the summer months when it's warm.If... show more Hi In point of fact heat can and does affect diabetes. I always run less sugary and thus need less insulin in the summer months when it's warm. If you also consider that diabetics have more problems when they have an infection because this usually goes hand in hand with a high temperature. The point is that the human body is one sensitive organism. My advice would be to take a few extra carbs before entering the sauna and to check Blood Glucose levels in the normal way. After all if they go hypo on there own in the sauna they are not in a postion to make them selves safe especially if they are unconscious. And if they become a little hyperglycaemic this is better short term and sorted out by checking blood glucose levels afterwards and doing a correction dose accordingly. Then on leaving to a recheck the chances are with the extra carns the BG should be quite reasonable BUT be aware of the fact that your friend MAY go hypo as salt loss, blood chemistry etc are all affected by heat. My recomendation would be to advise them NEVER to go to a sauna alone and to take hypostop/glucose with them just in case a drink like lucozade, to be taken in an emergency, would be cool . . . . . errrr well not so cool if its taken into the sauna quite warm really but you know what I mean. Make sure that whoever goes with your friend is familiar with their symptoms for hypoglycaemia and to be ready to help and advise and of cour Continue reading >>

Steam Room: Benefits, Risks, And How It Compares To A Sauna

Steam Room: Benefits, Risks, And How It Compares To A Sauna

Steam rooms are similar to saunas. Both encourage you to sit in a small, heated room, and both claim your health will benefit. The big difference is in the type of heat that they provide. A sauna uses dry heat, usually from hot rocks or a closed stove. Steam rooms are heated by a generator filled with boiling water. While a sauna may help relax and loosen your muscles, it wont have the same health benefits of a steam room. The key to the steam rooms unique health benefits is the humidity. A steam room can improve your health in several ways. Sitting in a steam room might significantly improve your cardiovascular health. A study of older individuals showed that moist heat improved circulation, especially in extremities. Improved circulation can lead to lowered blood pressure and a healthier heart. It can also promote healing of broken skin tissue. Research shows that in a steam room, some peoples bodies release hormones that change their heart rate. One of these hormones, called aldosterone, regulates your blood pressure. When aldosterone is released from sitting in the steam room, it can help lower high blood pressure. This is part of the reason that the steam room makes you feel relaxed. Being in the steam room can also decrease your bodys production of cortisol. Cortisol is the hormone that regulates the level of stress that you feel. When your cortisol levels drop, you feel more in control and relaxed. Spending a few minutes in a relaxed state not only improves your health, but also helps heal your mind and improve your focus. Steam rooms create an environment that warms the mucous membrane and encourages deep breathing. As a result, using one can help break up congestion inside your sinuses and lungs. Steam therapy used for treating colds and sinus infections at ho Continue reading >>

Infrared Sauna For Low Blood Sugar | Good Health Saunas

Infrared Sauna For Low Blood Sugar | Good Health Saunas

Home Infrared Sauna Health Benefits Low Blood Sugar How Your Infrared Sauna Helps Low Blood Sugar Medical experts warn that by the year 2050, roughly 33% of American adults will have diabetes. Diabetes impairs the bodys ability to use glucose (the bodys natural source of energy) derived from the foods that we commonly eat. While insulin is naturally produced in the pancreas and delivers glucose to the cells to use as energy, diabetes greatly limits this process. In diabetics, the pancreas cannot properly make insulin and therefore glucose goes undelivered, causing low blood sugar. While many diabetics use infrared saunas to manage their diabetes, is it just the placebo effect, or can an infrared sauna really help with low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)? That was the question posed by a University of British Columbia professor in the universitys Department of Family Medicine. In the Journal of Alternative Medicines June 2010 issue, Dr. Beever shared established research into how infrared sauna treatments improved the lives of those with chronic fatigue, congestive heart failure, depression, and a whole range of conditions, but what about diabetes? In Dr. Beevers study at the Fraser Lake Community Health Centre, patients with Type 2 diabetes participated in 20-minute infrared sauna sessions three times per week over the span of three months. Conclusive Improvements for Those with Type II Diabetes Mellitus Dr. Beevers research concluded that infrared sauna use may be associated with improved quality of life in people with type II diabetes mellitus. Since many more are willing to spend time in an infrared sauna than, say, put time in at the gym or drastically alter their diet, Dr. Beever found more were willing to use infrared saunas in managing their diabetes when compared to Continue reading >>

Bath And Sauna In Diabetes Mellitus

Bath And Sauna In Diabetes Mellitus

Some researches show the usefulness of steam bath in case of diabetes mellitus, but in some cases steaming is prohibited for patients that suffer from this disease. Under the influence of the steam, some substances, binding insulin, are washed away, while the excessive amount of it may lead to hypoglycemic coma. Upon the first signs of coma patient has to drink hot sweet tea, but in very hard cases there is a need of direct glucose injection in patients organism via intravenous route. Most of patients agree that bathing has positive effect both in Russian and Turkish baths. Apart from overall improving effect, bathing helps to decrease blood sugar level, moreover, effect from this procedure works for 5-6 hours. However, if a patient has visited the steam bath, it is necessary to have another examination to detect possible counter-indications. In this case doctor may define an optimal temperature range, duration of staying in the bath as well as the rest, including or excluding, presumably, some other procedures. Counter-indications to bath in case of diabetes mellitus The acetone odor is a sign prohibiting to visit any bath, especially, when there are chronic diseases of kidneys and acute liver diseases as well as if there are some cardio-vascular diseases. Patient has to monitor his or her condition in bath and should avoid quick temperature changes. Patient also should not dip his or her body into cold water right after leaving the steam room because it may lead to vessel spasms. Besides, there is a high probability of fungus infections; that is why patient should take care of his feet and soils. This person must have personal slippers and look over soils after the bath. Visiting sauna in case of diabetes mellitus Sauna in case of diabetes mellitus and in general is Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Using Infrared Sauna : Diabetic Symptom Relief

Health Benefits Of Using Infrared Sauna : Diabetic Symptom Relief

Health Benefits of Using Infrared Sauna : Diabetic Symptom Relief Type II Diabetes is a serious condition that can afflict people of all ages. Those with the disorder have a higher risk of developing heart disease, organ and nerve damage, blindness, and many other serious medical conditions. Unfortunately, certain risk factors such as age, race and family history are out of your control, and increase the likelihood that you will develop the disease at some point in your lifetime.1 Although lifestyle and health habit changes can be made, adjusting to life with type II Diabetes can be difficult. Diet, exercise and medication can all help to alleviate symptoms, but relaxation is just as important. When you experience stress or anxiety, your body will increase the level of blood sugar in your body, which can have devastating consequences for those with Diabetes. Many relaxation techniques, such as mindfulness, visualization, deep breathing and mediation are utilized by those with the disease in an effort to counteract the negative effects of stress. Fortunately, a new treatment modality is on the rise: the infrared sauna. Thermal therapy has been shown to be of immense benefit to those suffering from type II Diabetes, providing an alternative form of treatment to standard relaxation practices. A study completed by the Department of Family Medicine at the University of British Columbia found that the physical health, general health, and social functioning indicesimproved. Visual analogue scales for stress and fatigue improved.2 in patients who underwent 20-minute sauna sessions three times a week for a period of three months. The conclusion? Thermal therapy, specifically that of the far-infrared sauna, can improve the overall general health and quality of life of those livi Continue reading >>

Lowering Blood Sugar By Turning Up Our Body Heat

Lowering Blood Sugar By Turning Up Our Body Heat

Lowering Blood Sugar By Turning Up Our Body Heat Some of us might be thrilled if we could manage our blood sugar by sitting in a hot tub or sauna, instead of working up a sweat biking, or using an elliptical. Unfortunately, passively raising our body temperature will never provide the same variety of benefits as aerobic exercise. Yet, research suggests hot baths and saunas may benefit people struggling with insulin resistance or glucose control, and those unable to exercise. The glucose lowering benefit of heat was revealed when some non-diabetic research volunteers, whose blood sugar and core temperatures were monitored, ate similar meals after sitting in a hot bath (104 degrees F) for 60 minutes, and after an hour long bike ride. Researchers were surprised to discover that the participants after-meal glucose readings were 10 percent lower following the steamy bath than after biking. Raising our core temperature may lower post-meal glucose because of HSPs, or heat shock proteins. These proteins are part of the immune system, released as our body temperature rises. HSPs are believed to reduce blood sugar levels by transporting glucose from the blood to our skeletal muscles. While enjoying a 60 minute hot soak before dinner is not a daily option for most of us, incorporating heat therapy into our weekly routine is something to consider since - besides improving insulin sensitivity - hot baths and saunas offer other diabetes-related perks: The researchers found an hour long hot bath increases the bodys energy expenditure by 80 percent. Thats significant, though its far less than the energy spent on a 60 minute bike ride. An hour of pedaling burns about 630 calories, whereas 60 minutes in hot water uses 140 calories. Saunas are more efficient calorie burners than hot bath Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Hot Baths And Saunas

Health Benefits Of Hot Baths And Saunas

Fitness Disclaimer: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only. Vigorous high-intensity exercise is not safe or suitable for everyone. You should consult a physician before beginning a new diet or exercise program and discontinue exercise immediately and consult your physician if you experience pain, dizziness, or discomfort. The results, if any, from the exercises may vary from person-to-person. Engaging in any exercise or fitness program involves the risk of injury. Mercola.com or our panel of fitness experts shall not be liable for any claims for injuries or damages resulting from or connected with the use of this site. Specific questions about your fitness condition cannot be answered without first establishing a trainer-client relationship. Hot tubs, saunas and cold baths have all been used to burn calories and normalize insulin levels Benefits to using heat include improved immune system function, detoxification, increased growth hormone and more restful sleep Cold thermogenesis may also improve your pain tolerance, cold tolerance, reduce food cravings and reduce overall body fat Can you get the benefits of exercise without exercising? In the last century, as more people moved off small, family-owned farms to live in large cities and towns, the exercise they experienced decreased dramatically. Over the next several decades, an entire exercise industry emerged. New fitness experts had two ways of marketing their workouts. The programs or devices were either so easy a child could do it, or they pushed you to experience limits you didn't think possible. Using a hot tub or hot sauna after a workout was one of the strategies some used to increase their calorie burn after working out. Apparently they were on to something. Recent research co Continue reading >>

Sauna Use Linked To Longer Life, Fewer Fatal Heart Problems

Sauna Use Linked To Longer Life, Fewer Fatal Heart Problems

Sauna use linked to longer life, fewer fatal heart problems Executive Editor, Harvard Women's Health Watch After shoveling for days, breaking up ice dams, and now shivering in this weeks frigid temperatures, I wouldnt mind sitting in a sauna for a bit. A new report in JAMA Internal Medicine makes this pastime even more appealing: regularly spending time in a sauna may help keep the heart healthy and extend life. Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland tracked 2,300 middle-aged men for an average of 20 years. They categorized the men into three groups according to how often they used a sauna each week. The men spent an average of 14 minutes per visit baking in 175 F heat. Over the course of the study, 49% of men who went to a sauna once a week died, compared with 38% of those who went two to three times a week and just 31% of those who went four to seven times a week. Frequent visits to a sauna were also associated with lower death rates from cardiovascular disease and stroke. The results dont surprise Dr. Thomas H. Lee, a cardiologist at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Womens Hospital and founding editor of the Harvard Heart Letter. The cardiovascular effects of sauna have been well documented in the past. It lowers blood pressure, and there is every reason to believe that its effects are good for blood vessels, says Dr. Lee. Earlier studies have shown that regular sauna bathing may benefit people with risk factors for heart disease, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Its generally safe and likely beneficial for people with mild heart failure , but may not be so hot for those with unstable angina or a recent heart attack. The researchers were quick to state that because of the unique properties of Finnish saunas, their results arent Continue reading >>

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