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Does Psyllium Spike Insulin

Does Psyllium Husk Lower Blood Sugar?

Does Psyllium Husk Lower Blood Sugar?

Psyllium, a form of soluble fiber, is derived from Plantago psyllium, a shrub that grows widely throughout the world. Consumed for its potential cholesterol- and blood pressure-lowering benefits, psyllium may also help manage blood sugar levels. However, psyllium interacts with some medications, including antidepressants and heart medications, so consult your doctor for guidance in the safe and appropriate use of psyllium. Adding psyllium to a normal diet can significantly lower insulin levels and decrease risk for metabolic syndrome -- a combination of conditions that increase risk for diabetes and heart disease -- in obese people, according to a study published in the January 2011 "British Journal of Nutrition." Participants who consumed psyllium supplements for 12 weeks raised their total fiber intake to 55 grams per day and decreased their insulin and cholesterol levels. A group that switched to a high-fiber diet and supplemented it with psyllium showed an average of 59 grams of fiber intake per day and even greater insulin-lowering benefits. Taking psyllium along with a meal can help decrease post-meal blood sugar spikes in diabetics by up to 20 percent, according to Dr. Donal O'Mathuna co-author of the book "Alternative Medicine: The Options, The Claims, The Evidence: How to Choose Wisely." The blood sugar-lowering effect was also demonstrated in non-diabetic people in a study published in the April 2012 "Journal of the American College of Nutrition," in which healthy participants who consumed 4 grams of psyllium with breakfast showed decreased blood sugar levels two hours after the breakfast meal compared to a control group that ate the same meal but did not take psyllium. Psyllium improves blood sugar management in the elderly, according to a review of previous Continue reading >>

Do Psyllium Husks Outside Of Rm Cause An Insulin Response??? : Cad/calp Forum : Active Low-carber Forums

Do Psyllium Husks Outside Of Rm Cause An Insulin Response??? : Cad/calp Forum : Active Low-carber Forums

Do Psyllium husks outside of RM cause an insulin response??? Do Psyllium husks outside of RM cause an insulin response??? I only take that stuff at my RM now, because of that same worry. Not the most convenient time to take it, but worth not messing up the chemistry of CAD. No, Sango, psyllium husks do not cause any fluctuatioons in blood sugar or anything else for that matter. Just make sure they are raw husks, not with any added stuff. I use Trader Joe's, and have for years. They are all natural. They contain carbohydrates, but if you look on the back of the container, all the carbs are fiber which means they cannot and will not be absorbed by your body, they really make you feel full, and keep you regular naturally. Also try guar gum, it's a white fiber which is a soluble fiber, when your pour it in water it thickens, I bought mine( raw guar gum, no stuff added) at a health food store, can't remember which one. I switch between psyllium and guar gum. Also, if you are bad and you cheat( I am not on any of these programs, I just try to eliminate sugar and eat veggies and healthy food, but sometimes, like last night we had pizza) just drink a large cup of water with either of these fibers and it will help prevent calories and carbs being absorbed and instead being flushed out. Of course some will be absorbed, but it certainly helps!!! By the way, I used to weigh about what you weigh now. I now weigh 138. ( in about 6 months, ps, I don't work out)Have you considered just trying to eat healthy? Don't be scared, I hate salads and never touch them. I still consider myself a low carber(sort of ) as I have hypoglycemia and cannot eat sugar and starch, but like you I never lost any weight on all these programs.It's easier than you think. For example, there is a low carb bread Continue reading >>

The Super Fiber That Controls Your Appetite And Blood Sugar

The Super Fiber That Controls Your Appetite And Blood Sugar

IMAGINE EATING 12 POUNDS of food a day — and still staying thin and healthy. That may sound crazy, but it’s exactly what our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate for millennia! And they didn’t have any obesity or chronic diseases like heart disease, diabetes, cancer, or dementia. Of course, I wouldn’t advise anyone today to eat 12 pounds of food, because the food in our society lacks one major secret ingredient that our ancestors ate in nearly all their food — fiber! Fiber has so many health benefits that I want to focus on it in this blog. I’ll explain some of its benefits and give you 9 tips you can begin using today to get more fiber in your diet. I’ll also tell you about my favorite “super-fiber” that can help you increase your total fiber intake overnight. But before I tell you about what fiber can do for you, let’s a look a little more at the history of fiber. Why Bushmen are Healthier than the Average Westerner Dr. Dennis Burkitt, a famous English physician, studied the differences between indigenous African bushmen and their “civilized” western counterparts. The bushmen seemed to be free of the scourges of modern life — including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Dr. Burkitt found that the average bushman had a stool weight of 2 pounds and the “civilized” men had a stool weight of only 4 ounces – that’s 87.5% smaller! The difference was in the amount of fiber they ate. Today, the average American eats about 8 grams of fiber a day. But the average hunter and gatherer ate 100 grams from all manner of roots, berries, leaves and plant foods. And the fiber is what helped those ancestors of ours stay healthy. Just take a look at all the good things that fiber can do for your body. You need fiber to keep healthy from top to bottom Continue reading >>

Does Psyllium Husk Spike Insulin?

Does Psyllium Husk Spike Insulin?

Answered Aug 3, 2017 Author has 9k answers and 6.3m answer views No, it usually moderates insulin response and prevents spikes, however its possible an individual could have an atypical reaction. From Satiety effects of psyllium in healthy volunteers The majority of the research to date has demonstrated that consumption of psyllium, a gel forming non-fermentable viscous soluble fiber can reduce the risks of metabolic conditions by improving glucose levels and insulin response, as well as lipid profile in humans ( McRorie, 2015 ). There are several randomized, well-controlled clinical studies that assessed doses of 615 g/day (most studies at 10 g/day) psyllium in cardiometabolic conditions ( McRorie, 2015 ). These studies show that the cholesterol lowering effects of psyllium range from 2% to 20% for total cholesterol, and 6% to 24% for LDL-cholesterol versus placebo ( Anderson, Floore, Geil, Spencer, & Balm, 1991; Cicero, Derosa, Bove, Imola, & Borghi, Gaddi, 2010; McRorie, 2015 ). Psyllium supplementation can indeed reduce the risks of metabolic conditions by improving glucose levels and insulin response, as well as lipid profile in humans ( McRorie, 2015 ). 446 Views View Upvoters Answer requested by Continue reading >>

Psyllium Husk For Diabetes

Psyllium Husk For Diabetes

A white bowl of psyllium husk.Photo Credit: mtphoto19/iStock/Getty Images For most people with diabetes, the main health concern is to keep blood sugar levels under control and avoid wild fluctuations that could cause health complications. Diabetic individuals may want to try psyllium husk as a way to lower blood glucose levels naturally. Aside from being useful in blood sugar control, psyllium husk supplements may benefit the health of diabetics in other ways as well. Psyllium husk, the outer layer of psyllium seeds, swells upon contact with water and acts as soluble fiber in the digestive tract. Psyllium husk can be purchased as loose powder or preformed into tablets, capsules or granules. Psyllium can be used for a variety of purposes, including the treatment of high cholesterol, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation and diabetes. Psyllium husk must be taken with water, because it can swell in the throat and cause an obstruction if taken without liquid. Individuals taking psyllium should also drink six to eight glasses of water a day. Individuals with diabetes have problems producing enough insulin or using the insulin they do produce to keep blood glucose levels under control. Consuming psyllium may be one way to help modulate blood sugar. In a 1991 study in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition," for individuals with non-insulin-dependent diabetes, taking psyllium with breakfast and dinner was found to reduce the rise in glucose after every meal during the day, including lunch. In addition to the blood glucose-lowering ability of psyllium husk, this fiber supplement may also lower blood lipid levels in diabetics. A 1999 study in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" found that total cholesterol levels dropped by 8.9 percent and LDL cholesterol levels Continue reading >>

How To Get More Fiber If You Have Diabetes

How To Get More Fiber If You Have Diabetes

Even dressed up, 50 grams of daily fiber is a lot to pack away.(ISTOCKPHOTO)If youve got type 2 diabetes, the quality of food is as important as the quantity. And fiber is the best stuff around. Fiber itself doesnt raise blood sugar because it can't be digested, and that's good. But even better, it can blunt the impact that carbohydrates have on blood sugar. The reason? The intestines take a bit more time to digest fiber-rich foods, and that slows the release of glucose into your bloodstream. You need to check labels and add more fiber A 2000 study of 13 patients showed that patients with diabetes who consumed 50 grams of fiber each day lowered their glucose levels 10% and insulin levels 12% more than those who consumed 24 grams of fiber a day. The problem is that 50 grams of fiber per day is a lot of fiber. Most Americans consume only 15 grams every day, according to the American Heart Association, and the American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes eat 25 to 50 grams daily. While its tough to consume that much, its not impossible. "Check nutrition labels to see how much fiber there is in the foods you eat," says LuAnn Berry, RD, a certified diabetes educator and diabetes specialist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Then go back to the ones with the most grams of fiber per serving." Good sources of fiber include: Whole grain products, such as whole wheat bread Dried beans, including kidney, black and garbanzos, lentils Oats, which are found in oatmeal Apples and pears with their skins on Berry says you can eat the fiber-high foods alone or add them to recipesfor example, put beans in a salad. However, dont forget to calculate how much carbohydrate you are adding. A half-cup of beans, for example, has the same carbohydrate count as Continue reading >>

Fibre Reduces Insulin – How To Lose Weight X

Fibre Reduces Insulin – How To Lose Weight X

When we consider the nutritional benefits of food, we think about the vitamins, minerals and nutrients they contain. We think about components in the food that nourish the body. Fibre is completely different. The key to understanding fibre’s effect is to realize that the benefit lies not as a nutrient, but as an anti-nutrient. Fibre has the ability to reduce absorption and digestion. Fibre subtracts rather than adds. In the case of sugars and insulin, this is good. Soluble fibre reduces absorption of carbohydrates, which in turn reduces blood glucose and insulin levels. In one study, type 2 diabetic patients were given liquid meals containing 55% carbohydrates with or without the addition of dietary fibre. Fibre reduced both the glucose and the insulin peaks, despite consuming exactly the same amount of carbohydrates. Fibre acts as an anti-nutrient. Because insulin is the main driver of obesity and diabetes, reduction is beneficial. In essence, fibre acts as a sort of ‘antidote’ to the carbohydrate, which, in this analogy, is the ‘poison’. Carbohydrates, even sugar, are not literally poisonous, but comparison is useful to understand the effect of fibre. It is no coincidence that virtually all plant foods, in their natural, unrefined state contains fibre. Mother Nature has pre-packaged the ‘antidote’ with the ‘poison’. Thus, traditional societies may follow diets high in carbohydrate without evidence of obesity or Type 2 Diabetes. The Okinawans, for instance, base their diet upon the sweet potato, and consume an estimated 80% of their calories as carbohydrate. High fibre protects against obesity. Until recently, they were one of the longest-lived peoples on earth. The Kitavans of New Guinea followed a diet estimated to be close to 70% carbohydrate with Continue reading >>

Does Psyllium Husk Lower Blood Sugar?

Does Psyllium Husk Lower Blood Sugar?

Psyllium husks come from the seeds of an herb called Plantago ovata. The most common use for psyllium husk is in laxatives that help bulk up your stool, making it easier to pass. These supplements may help to improve your cholesterol levels and treat intestinal issues including constipation, diarrhea, hemorrhoids and irritable bowel syndrome. As they are high in soluble fiber, they may also help lower blood glucose levels in people who have Type 2 diabetes. Fasting Blood Sugar Levels Fasting blood sugar levels, which are taken when you have not had anything to eat or drink but water for at least eight hours, are used to diagnose diabetes and sometimes to monitor how well diabetics are controlling blood sugar levels. Normal levels range from 70 to 100 milligrams per deciliter, while diabetics have blood sugar levels above 126 milligrams per deciliter if their diabetes isn't well controlled. A study published in November 2005 in the "Journal of Ethnopharmacology" found that Type 2 diabetics who took 5.1 grams of psyllium husk before each lunch and dinner for eight weeks while continuing to take their regular diabetes medications experienced significant decreases in their fasting blood sugar levels. After Meal Blood Sugar Levels Blood glucose levels increase after meals, and diabetics sometimes have trouble keeping these increases within acceptable levels. Diabetics often use carbohydrate counting, diabetes-exchange lists or the glycemic index to help plan their diets so that they limit these spikes in blood glucose levels. Adding 5.1 grams of psyllium husk fiber to each lunch and dinner may help people with Type 2 diabetes better control their post prandial, or after-meal, blood glucose levels, according to an article published in "The Annals of Pharmacotherapy" in Octobe Continue reading >>

The Power Of Psyllium Fiber

The Power Of Psyllium Fiber

The Power of Psyllium Fiber by Berkeley Wellness Many people take psyllium as a fiber supplement for its laxative effect or as a way to help lower blood cholesterol. Made from the husks of seeds from the Plantago ovata plant, it is sold as a powder or capsules. Another potential benefit of psyllium is its ability to help control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This was examined in an analysis of 10 studies, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Psyllium was taken before meals at standard doses. The greatest reductions in blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (a longer-term measure of blood sugar control) occurred in people with the worst blood sugar control initially and were “comparable to the effect of many drugs that are used to treat diabetes,” the researchers wrote. The analysis also looked at 14 studies involving people with prediabetes and found that psyllium modestly reduced blood sugar in them. If you have diabetes and take medication for it, consult your health care provider before trying psyllium, since the combination may result in excessive lowering of blood sugar; your dose of medication or psyllium may need to be adjusted. And make sure the psyllium doesn’t contain added sugar (it often does). The authors of the study were employed or funded by Procter & Gamble, the maker of a brand of psyllium (Metamucil). How psyllium works The fiber in psyllium absorbs water in the colon, resulting in bulkier stool (thus it’s called a “bulk-forming” laxative); it also forms emollient gels that facilitate the passage of stool. Psyllium is gentle and usually takes 12 to 24 hours to affect bowel movements. Its cholesterol-lowering effect was perhaps best seen in a 2005 study in the Archives of Internal Medicine, which found that people Continue reading >>

The Use Of Psyllium For Insulin Resistance

The Use Of Psyllium For Insulin Resistance

Home Equinews The Use of Psyllium for Insulin Resistance The Use of Psyllium for Insulin Resistance In the horse world, psyllium is the product of choice to prevent sand colic, but little else in known about its usefulness. However, in human nutrition circles, researchers are finding more and more uses for this innocuous seed coat. Most notably, the use of psyllium (common in products like Metamucil) is now often recommended for patients with diabetes because it moderates glucose response and insulin release. It is even recommended as a preventive for humans at risk of developing diabetes. Will psyllium find its way into equine diets because of these same properties? Because the focus of psyllium use in horses centers around its use in sand colic, little is known about its effect on insulin sensitivity. Psyllium is the seed husk of thePlantago ovataplant and is known for its ability to absorb water rapidly and form a gelatinous substance of glycosides and musilages, known in human nutrition as soluble fiber. The husk is 70% soluble fiber, which can increase tenfold in bulk with addition of water. Most commonly it is sold ground to a near powder and is the ingredient that adds the fiber to some of the high-fiber cereals, breads, and snack bars. The gel-forming property of psyllium has other uses. For humans, psyllium is recommended for several problems: relief of both diarrhea and constipation, hemorrhoids, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and obesity (reducing hunger cravings). The hydrophilic property and gel formation as well as high dietary fiber content make it an attractive food ingredient. How psyllium can help with constipation (draws water into the bowel), diarrhea (absorbs exc Continue reading >>

Psyllium: Benefits, Safety, And Dosage

Psyllium: Benefits, Safety, And Dosage

Psyllium has also been shown to relieve diarrhea ( 2 , 11 , 12 , 13 ). It does this by acting as a water-absorbing agent, which can increase stool thickness and slow down its passage through the colon. One study showed psyllium husk significantly decreased diarrhea in 30 cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy ( 14 ). Another study treated eight people who had lactulose-induced diarrhea with 3.5 grams, three times daily. Doing so increased their stomach emptying time from 69 to 87 minutes, which meant fewer bowel movements ( 15 ). So psyllium can both prevent constipation and reduce diarrhea, effectively helping to normalize your bowel movements if you are having problems. Bottom Line: Psyllium can help treat diarrhea by increasing stool size and slowing its passage through the intestinal tract. Fiber supplementation has been shown to control glycemic response to a meal and reduce insulin and blood sugar levels. This is particularly the case with water-soluble fibers like psyllium ( 16 , 17 , 18 , 19 , 20 ). In fact, psyllium works better than other fibers like bran. This is because its gel-forming fibers can slow down the digestion of food, which helps regulate blood sugar levels ( 21 , 22 ). One study treated 56 diabetic men with 5.1 grams of psyllium twice per day for eight weeks. It reduced their daily blood sugar levels by 11% ( 23 ). In another study in people with type 2 diabetes , a higher daily dose (five grams consumed three times per day) for six weeks resulted in a 29% reduction in blood sugar levels within the first two weeks ( 19 ). Because psyllium is able to slow down the digestion of food, it's recommended to take it with food, rather than on its own, so it has a greater effect on your blood sugar levels ( 22 ). It seems that a daily dose of at le Continue reading >>

Psyllium Husk For Diabetes: Blood Sugar & Cholesterol Lowering Effects

Psyllium Husk For Diabetes: Blood Sugar & Cholesterol Lowering Effects

Psyllium husks are derived from an Indian shrub called Plantago ovata. They are soluble fibers that fuel healthy gut bacteria, boost digestion, and due to their large 10-30% mucilage, they are most commonly used as natural laxative to relieve constipation. fibers, psyllium husks help move digestion along by wrapping the digested food in a gel-like coating. This coating makes breaking down and eliminating food a much easier task, which leaves you feeling lighter and more energetic. Still, while digestive health benefits are great, you will be even more excited to learn about the blood sugar-stabilizing and cholesterol-lowering potential of these tiny husks. The exact mechanism behind the glucose and cholesterol-lowering effects of psyllium husks has not been clearly identified. However, researchers suggest it is the high soluble fiber content of psyllium husk that may play a significant role in these outcomes. Since psyllium produces a viscous gel-like substance, this slows the absorption of glucose from the small intestine. Additionally the fiber helps delay stomach emptying, which stalls carbohydrate digestion. And the fiber may also prevent carbohydrate from accessing certain digestive enzymes, which alters their metabolism. In terms of blood sugar levels, all these functions help topromote more stable blood sugars, eliminate sudden spikes in In terms of cholesterol, soluble fiber is thought to alter bile metabolism, which appears to deplete bile salt in the liver. As a consequence this alters cholesterol metabolism. Soluble fiber also increases LDL receptors, enhancing LDL cholesterol uptake from the bloodstream, which results in lower cholesterol levels. And since the fiber reduces glucose levels, this reduces liver insulin stimulation of cholesterol synthesis. Fib Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Dietary Fiber And Other Factors On Insulin Response: Role In Obesity.

The Effect Of Dietary Fiber And Other Factors On Insulin Response: Role In Obesity.

Abstract Epidemiologic evidence favors the hypothesis that obesity may result from the fiber-depleted diet of industrialized societies. Since hyperinsulinemia is a universal characteristic and perhaps causal of obesity, the possibility is considered that dietary factors causing excess insulin secretion might lead to obesity. Dietary glucose causes a slightly greater insulin rise than cooked starch containing an equal amount of carbohydrate, and high fiber starchy foods cause a much lesser insulin response than does glucose in solution. Doubling the dose of carbohydrate in a meal causes only a small increase in glucose response but a large increase in insulin response. Dietary fiber could act by displacing some of the carbohydrate that would normally be absorbable in the small intestine, or could translocate the carbohydrate to a point lower in the intestinal tract where less effect on insulin secretion would be observed. Evidence is presented that a higher fiber diet is associated with a higher concentration of fasting circulating free fatty acids, a lesser post-cibal decrease in circulating free fatty acids and triglycerides and less chronic increase in fasting triglycerides than a low fiber diet. These differences are associated with a lesser insulin response to high fiber meals. The extreme fluctuations between the fed and fasted states seen with low fiber diets are thus dampened by high fiber diets. The less complete inhibition of lipolysis during the fed state, and more intense lipolysis during fasting, suggested by the above data, might tend to prevent obesity. The mechanisms of the lesser insulin response to high rather than low fiber meals are not known, but the possibility that dietary fiber decreases the GIP response is considered. Continue reading >>

How To Take Psyllium Husk For Weight Loss

How To Take Psyllium Husk For Weight Loss

How to Take Psyllium Husk for Weight Loss For those who struggle with over-eating, this post covers how to take psyllium husk for weight loss. Psyllium is a plant within the Plantagogenus, specifically plantago ovata. Psyllium husk is the seeds of the plantago ovata plant. Specifically, the outer layer of the seed, or husk. The husk is also called mucilage. Mucilage is a colorless, gel-like substance that is mostly fiber. The fiber in psyllium is similar to what is found in many other fruits and vegetables. Psyllium, however, contains virtually no other macro-nutrients like sugar or fat. For this reason, psyllium is an ideal way to supplement dietary fiber without additional calories. There arent any tricks in how to take psyllium husk for weight loss. Psyllium husk for weight loss works because it is a low-calorie way to improve digestion, control blood sugar levels, and improve satiety (feel full). The high-fiber content of psyllium husk is what makes it effective, but there are many other benefits of fiber in addition to weight loss. We will look at how psyllium husk works as well as how to take psyllium husk for weight loss. For more about psyllium husk, see our post: what is psyllium husk? Dietary Fiber: how psyllium works for weight loss Dietary fiber refers to the fiber that we eat. It is a natural part of the fruits and vegetables we regularly consume. A simple way of thinking about dietary fiber is that it is the parts of the plants that give it shape and structure. When fruits and vegetables are juiced, the fiber or roughage, is what gets left behind. The health benefits of this fiber is why we recommend eating whole foods as opposed to processed or juiced fruits and vegetables. Dietary fiber is only found in plants. Beans, lentils, berries, avocado, whole gr Continue reading >>

More Evidence That A High-fiber Diet Can Curb Type 2 Diabetes

More Evidence That A High-fiber Diet Can Curb Type 2 Diabetes

People who ate more than 26 grams of fiber a day had an 18 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who ate 19 grams a day or less Fiber may benefit diabetes by altering hormonal signals, slowing down nutrient absorption or altering fermentation in the large intestine, along with promoting feelings of satiety and weight loss The majority of your fiber should come from vegetables, not grains By Dr. Mercola In the US, nearly 80 million people, or one in four has some form of diabetes or pre-diabetes. One in two people with diabetes do not know they have it,1 which increases the odds of developing complications, which can be deadly. Leading a healthy lifestyle is one of the best strategies to prevent, and treat, type 2 diabetes, and even more specifically, eating a high-fiber diet is emerging as a key strategy you can use to lower your risk. More Than 26 Grams of Fiber a Day May Lower Your Diabetes Risk US dietary guidelines call for adults to consume 20-30 grams of fiber per day. I believe an ideal amount for most adults is around 50 grams per 1,000 calories consumed. Most people, however, get only half that, or less. In a recent study conducted by researchers at the Imperial College London, those who had the highest intake of fiber (more than 26 grams a day) had an 18 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest intake (less than 19 grams a day).2 The fiber may benefit diabetes by altering hormonal signals, slowing down nutrient absorption or altering fermentation in the large intestine, along with promoting feelings of satiety.3 Eating a high-fiber diet is also associated with weight loss, and the researchers believe this may, in turn, lower diabetes risk. In fact, when the researchers accounted for participants' BMI, th Continue reading >>

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