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Does Pain Affect Blood Sugar

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

Stress And Blood Glucose Levels

Stress And Blood Glucose Levels

When the body is under stress, the adrenal glands trigger the release of glucose stored in various organs, which often leads to elevated levels of glucose in the bloodstream. For people with diabetes, this can be particularly problematic as they find it harder than non-diabetics to regain normal blood glucose levels after a bout of stress. The common misconception with stress is that it is an emotional problem, often disguised as anxiety, worry, or depression. However, the reality is that stress can also be physical, nutritional, and chemical. For example, stress can be experienced as physical pain or illness, and can also be triggered by situations such as an accident, the death of a friend or relative or confrontations with other people. Essentially, stress can be considered as anything that tends to change the control that you have over our body and our emotions The Adrenal Glands The adrenal glands, which site atop the kidneys, are mainly responsible for releasing hormones in response to stress. The hypothalamus area of the brain sends a chemical signal to the adrenal glands, which become enlarged and produce two hormones - epinephrine (also called adrenaline) and norepinephrine. These hormones are released into the blood to help prepare the body for the so-called 'fight-or-flight response'. They speed up the heart and widen airways and blood vessels, causing a rise in blood pressure and muscle tension. While the main role of norepinephrine is to prevent blood pressure from falling, epinephrine is an important blood sugar regulating substance. It is responsible for converting glycogen (the glucose stored in muscle cells and liver) into glucose when blood sugar levels drop, thus ensuring normal levels of blood glucose are maintained. Raising blood sugar is important Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Diabetes and joint pain are considered to be independent conditions. Joint pain may be a response to an illness, injury, or arthritis. It can be chronic (long-term) or acute (short-term). Diabetes is caused by the body not using the hormone insulin correctly, or insufficient production of it, which affects blood sugar levels. What would a hormone and blood sugar-related condition have to do with joint health? Diabetes is associated with widespread symptoms and complications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. There is an undeniably strong link between the two conditions. Diabetes can damage joints, a condition called diabetic arthropathy. Unlike pain caused by immediate trauma, the pain of arthropathy happens over time. Other symptoms include: thick skin changes in the feet painful shoulders carpal tunnel syndrome A joint is the place where two bones come together. Once a joint wears down, the protection it provides is lost. Joint pain from diabetic arthropathy comes in different forms. Charcot’s joint occurs when diabetic nerve damage causes a joint to break down. Also called neuropathic arthropathy, this condition is seen in the feet and ankles in people with diabetes. Nerve damage in the feet is common in diabetes, which may lead to Charcot’s joint. A loss of nerve function leads to numbness. People who walk on numb feet are more likely to twist and injure ligaments without knowing it. This places pressure on the joints, which can eventually cause them to wear down. Severe damage leads to deformities in the foot and other affected joints. Bone deformities in Charcot’s joint may be prevented through early intervention. Signs of the condition include: painful joints swelling or redn Continue reading >>

Chronic Pain And Blood Glucose

Chronic Pain And Blood Glucose

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I suffer from spinal and exit canal stenosis which greatly affects my mobility giving me back pain, numbness, weakness scaitic pain etc. Until recently my blood glucose had been kept under reasonable control by liragutide, gliclazide and metformin. My hba1c was about 7.6. Until recently I was accustomed to getting bg levels 2 hours after breakfast of around 11 in the old money but after a period of no monitoring I now find they have increased to about 16 at the same time of day. At the same time though my pain levels have shot up and I spend half the day in extreme pain to the point of crying with severe effects on my mobility. Because of this I have been switched from long term (increasing) use of Tramadol for pain relief to Oxycodone but we have not been able to establish a dosage level where I get anywhere enough pain relief while remaining lucid. I suspect I am one of these people that opiates don't work for and I'm going to have to get the pain clinic to come up with some better ideas if I am to find a reason to carry on with my life. Question is, is it likely that the severe prolonged pain is responsible for this degree of blood sugar increase? Forgive me but at the time of writing I don't have any other reference points for the increase other than after breakfast. I'm almost afraid to check as I feel I'm in danger of overloading my doctor with more problems. I have increased sweating and tiredness but it's almost impossible to attribute any symptoms to diabetes when I'm taking so many pain killing drugs ( I take Pregabalin and diclofenac as well). Do I take up the BG readings with my doctor and risk distracting him from trying to relieve my pai Continue reading >>

Managing Your Blood Sugars And Your Chronic Back Pain

Managing Your Blood Sugars And Your Chronic Back Pain

Did you know that more than 29 million U.S. adults have diabetes, and 25 percent of them don’t even know it? Those numbers were reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The 25 percent breaks down to (and get ready for this) 8 million Americans who experience diabetic symptoms but are unaware that they relate to this disease. So, what is this disease and what are those symptoms? What is Diabetes: Diabetes describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar) or low blood glucose, either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin or both, according to Medical News Today. A diabetic has to check their blood sugar levels normally six times a day, before a meal and two hours after, in order to maintain healthy glucose levels as well as to just feel good. There are two main types of diabetes. What is Type 1 Diabetes: The Mayo Clinic describes type 1 diabetes, also called insulin-dependent diabetes as a chronic condition where the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells in order to produce energy. Without energy, it can be hard to walk up a small flight of stairs without needing a break or literally hurting. Without insulin, your body goes out of whack, increasing your blood sugar levels causing severe symptoms leading to a coma if left untreated (more on that in a bit) and on the contrary, low blood sugar, which can result in seizures or in severe cases, death. What is Type 2 Diabetes: Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. What Continue reading >>

How Stress Hormones Raise Blood Sugar

How Stress Hormones Raise Blood Sugar

In this excerpt from “Think Like a Pancreas”, certified diabetes educator Gary Scheiner describes why this happens and what to do about it. (excerpted from Think Like A Pancreas: A Practical Guide to Managing Diabetes With Insulin by Gary Scheiner MS, CDE, DaCapo Press, 2011) Last weekend I decided to stay up late and watch a scary movie. It had something to do with super-gross vampires who get their jollies by eating the flesh of unsuspecting hotel guests. Anyway, after the final gut-wrenching, heart-pumping scene, I decided to check my blood sugar. I’ll be darned – it had risen about 200 mg/dL (11 mmol) during the movie. With blood that sweet, I felt like the grand prize for any vampires that might happen to be lurking in my neighborhood. As you may be aware, the liver serves as a storehouse for glucose, keeping it in a concentrated form called glycogen. The liver breaks down small amounts of glycogen all the time, releasing glucose into the bloodstream to nourish the brain, nerves, heart and other “always active” organs. The liver’s release of glucose depends largely on the presence of certain hormones. Of all the hormones in the body, only insulin causes the liver to take sugar out of the bloodstream and store it in the form of glycogen. All the other hormones—including stress hormones, sex hormones, growth hormones and glucagon—cause the liver to secrete glucose back into the bloodstream. Growth hormone is produced in a 24-hour cycle and is responsible for the blood sugar rise that we sometimes see during the night or in the early morning. The other “stress” hormones, particularly epinephrine (adrenaline) and cortisol, are produced when our body needs a rapid influx of sugar for energy purposes. The glucose rise I experienced during the scary Continue reading >>

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here. twitter summary: Adam identifies at least 22 things that affect blood glucose, including food, medication, activity, biological, & environmental factors. short summary: As patients, we tend to blame ourselves for out of range blood sugars – after all, the equation to “good diabetes management” is supposedly simple (eating, exercise, medication). But have you ever done everything right and still had a glucose that was too high or too low? In this article, I look into the wide variety of things that can actually affect blood glucose - at least 22! – including food, medication, activity, and both biological and environmental factors. The bottom line is that diabetes is very complicated, and for even the most educated and diligent patients, it’s nearly impossible to keep track of everything that affects blood glucose. So when you see an out-of-range glucose value, don’t judge yourself – use it as information to make better decisions. As a patient, I always fall into the trap of thinking I’m at fault for out of range blood sugars. By taking my medication, monitoring my blood glucose, watching what I eat, and exercising, I would like to have perfect in-range values all the time. But after 13 years of type 1 diabetes, I’ve learned it’s just not that simple. There are all kinds of factors that affect blood glucose, many of which are impossible to control, remember, or even account for. Based on personal experience, conversations with experts, and scientific research, here’s a non-exhaustive list of 22 factors that can affect blood glucose. They are separated into five areas – Food, Medication, Activity, Biological factors, and Environmental factors. I’ve provided arrows to show the ge Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

When you hear the word “diabetes,” your first thought is likely about high blood sugar. Blood sugar is an often-underestimated component of your health. When it’s out of whack over a long period of time, it could develop into diabetes. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that allows your body to turn glucose (sugar) into energy. Here’s what symptoms may occur to your body when diabetes takes effect. Diabetes can be effectively managed when caught early. However, when left untreated, it can lead to potential complications that include heart disease, stroke, kidney damage, and nerve damage. Normally after you eat or drink, your body will break down sugars from your food and use them for energy in your cells. To accomplish this, your pancreas needs to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin is what facilitates the process of pulling sugar from the blood and putting it in the cells for use, or energy. If you have diabetes, your pancreas either produces too little insulin or none at all. The insulin can’t be used effectively. This allows blood glucose levels to rise while the rest of your cells are deprived of much-needed energy. This can lead to a wide variety of problems affecting nearly every major body system. The effects of diabetes on your body also depends on the type you have. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1, also called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an immune system disorder. Your own immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, destroying your body’s ability to make insulin. With type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin to live. Most people are diagnosed as a child or young adult. Type 2 is related to insulin resistance. It used to occur i Continue reading >>

How To Manage Diabetes While On Oxycodone

How To Manage Diabetes While On Oxycodone

What happens to a person’s blood sugar when they are under stress due to pain, and must take a narcotic pain reliever such as oxycodone? In this article, we will explore what happens to a person with diabetes who is taking long term pain medication. We will look at whether it raises or lowers blood glucose. We will look at how taking oxycodone affects blood glucose levels, activity levels and appetite, and how that could influence the self-management of diabetes. We will look at ways that you can maintain blood glucose in target ranges while taking a narcotic pain reliever such as oxycodone. John’s story As John relayed to me during a phone conversation, he is taking a combination of oxycodone plus acetaminophen for severe pain in his legs related to poor circulation and neuropathy because of his Type 1 diabetes. He has had severe sleep disruption, and was getting no relief on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. He has been taking oxycodone now for about three months, and has seen a need to increase the basal rate on his insulin pump in order to stay in target range with his blood glucose. He found that once the stress of the pain was gone, his numbers have stayed in range. I suggest reading the following: What is oxycodone? Oxycodone is a narcotic pain reliever that is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. It is in the class of drugs called “opiate analgesics,” and can be found in combination with other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as aspirin, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen. Oxycodone can also be found in combination with aspirin and acetaminophen. Each of these components can also have side effects in addition to the oxycodone. Brand names of combination medications include Nortab, Vicodin, and Lortab and Percocet. Precautions for oxycodo Continue reading >>

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

High blood sugar symptoms Glucose, or sugar, is the fuel that powers cells throughout the body. Blood levels of this energy source ebb and flow naturally, depending what you eat (and how much), as well as when you eat it. But when something goes wrong—and cells aren't absorbing the glucose—the resulting high blood sugar damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs, setting the stage for dangerous complications. Normal blood-sugar readings typically fall between 60 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl. A blood test called a hemoglobin A1c measures average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. A normal reading is below 5.7% for people without diabetes. An excess of glucose in the bloodstream, or hyperglycemia, is a sign of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes don’t make insulin, the hormone needed to ferry sugar from the bloodstream into cells. Type 2 diabetes means your body doesn’t use insulin properly and you can end up with too much or too little insulin. Either way, without proper treatment, toxic amounts of sugar can build up in the bloodstream, wreaking havoc head to toe. That’s why it’s so important to get your blood sugar levels in check. “If you keep glucose levels near normal, you reduce the risk of diabetes complications,” says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. Here’s a rundown of the major complications and symptoms of high blood sugar. No symptoms at all Often, high blood sugar causes no (obvious) symptoms at all, at least at first. About 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but one in four has no idea. Another 86 million have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That's why it’s a good idea to get your blood sugar test Continue reading >>

Effects Of Opioids On Diabetes

Effects Of Opioids On Diabetes

Watch This Report On The Relationship Between Opioids And Diabetes People with diabetes are often plagued by acute and chronic pain. According to an article in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, four out of ten adults with Type 2 diabetes suffer from pain. Whether because of diabetic neuropathy, osteoarthritis, or from the effects of obesity, patients often turn to opioids for pain relief. While opioid medications may provide some measure of relief, they’re also associated with significant health risks, including weight gain and glycemic dysregulation. When it comes to behavioral problems, the use of opioids can have an immediate effect on your ability to monitor and control your diabetes. The altered perceptions of pain that make opioid medications work can also affect the monitoring of your own diabetes conditions. In an altered state, it can become difficult to recognize hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia, or diabetic ketoacidosis. These altered perceptions themselves can also impact a normal health routine. When not in the right mind, it increases the risk of missing insulin injections that can then lead to hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia, or diabetic ketoacidosis. In addition, these altered perceptions from opioid use can influence your own healthy eating habits, making it more difficult to control your blood glucose levels and the ability to manage your diabetes. In a study published in the Journal of Opioid Management, researchers found that certain types of opioids may even induce a taste preference for sweet foods. This preference and acting upon it can, of course, lead to issues with diabetes control and management. It can also lead to weight gain and tooth decay. If you are on opioids for pain, discuss alternative forms of treatment with your doctor. While Continue reading >>

How Can Pain Affect Blood Sugar In People With Diabetes?

How Can Pain Affect Blood Sugar In People With Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Can High Blood Sugar Cause Joint Pain?

Can High Blood Sugar Cause Joint Pain?

Joint pain is an annoying symptom felt by millions of people around the world each day. Sitting for too long, obesity, Arthritis, repetitive stress are all factors that are pointed out as the most common causes of joint pain in either the hip or the knee or the back. But did you ever think that your high blood sugar can be a significant factor for your joint pain? According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of the Arthritis patients are suffering from Diabetes at the same time. We cannot deny the obvious link between these two conditions, can we? It is clear as a day that diabetes is actually worsening the arthritis symptoms and adds up to the joint pain that you are already feeling. So if you are suffering from Diabetes and Arthritis at the same time, or if you are just dealing with Diabetes, please do follow us through to find out how exactly are these two conditions associated and how you can act to reduce your joint pain. Is Your High Blood Sugar The Reason That Causes Your Joint Pain? It is no secret that Diabetes Mellitus causes various health problems regarding all of the body’s systems. However, what may surprise a lot of people is finding out that Diabetes can actually worsen their joint pain or even cause one if not present before. One study published in the Acta Medica Scandinavica talked about a diagnosis known as the Diabetic shoulder. Diabetic shoulder, also known as frozen shoulder, is a condition in which the capsule of the shoulder joint becomes swollen and thickened causing decreased mobility, pain, and persistent stiffness to occur. It is not that Diabetes is the only cause for this condition, however, within patients suffering from Diabetes, the symptoms of the frozen shoulder are much more severe and harder to treat. Ano Continue reading >>

How Pain Relievers Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

How Pain Relievers Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Many of us don’t even think about our blood sugar levels when we’re scrabbling through the medicine cabinet, looking for a pain reliever. We just want to make the pain disappear—stat. But people with diabetes do need to take that matter into consideration when they’re taking any medication. If you have type 2 diabetes, your doctor or diabetes educator has probably warned you to be vigilant about the effects that that your diet, your activity level, and any other medication you take on a regular basis can have on your blood sugar levels. You also need to be careful about any pain relieving medication that you take, even if it’s just on an occasional basis, because certain types of pain killers can lower or raise your blood sugar levels. NSAIDs There are times when you can easily treat pain with an over-the counter pain reliever. You may take a low dose of aspirin or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) like ibuprofen or naproxen to relieve the occasional headache or muscle pain. A regular dose is unlikely to affect your blood sugar levels, but a higher-than-usual dose may lower your blood sugar level. Talk to your doctor about what’s an appropriate dose for your occasional aches and pains so you don’t accidentally cause an episode of hypoglycemia. Another word of caution. You might have settled on an effective dose of a particular pain reliever that won’t drastically alter your blood sugar levels. But your diabetes puts you at elevated risk for certain other health conditions. So you may have other medical conditions you need to manage—and you will need to watch out for the effect any pain killers you take can have on those. For example, NSAIDS like ibuprofen and naproxen can increase your blood pressure. And they can affect your kidneys, too, Continue reading >>

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