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Does Metoprolol Raise Blood Sugar

Blood Pressure Medications: Can They Raise My Triglycerides?

Blood Pressure Medications: Can They Raise My Triglycerides?

Yes, some blood pressure medications can affect triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Hydrochlorothiazide is commonly prescribed for high blood pressure. It's from a class of medications called diuretics, more commonly called water pills. High doses — 50 milligrams or more — of some diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide, can temporarily increase your low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol and triglycerides. The good news is that the rise in LDL cholesterol and triglycerides usually returns to normal within a year of starting these medications. And, the mild effects the drug has on cholesterol and triglycerides don't outweigh the benefits from lowering blood pressure. Smaller doses of hydrochlorothiazide usually don't cause a rise in cholesterol and triglycerides. Older beta blockers, such as propranolol (Inderal, Innopran XL), atenolol (Tenormin) and metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol-XL), can slightly increase triglycerides and decrease high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or "good") cholesterol. Typically this occurs in people who have a cluster of conditions (metabolic syndrome) that includes: High blood pressure High blood sugar Excess weight around the abdomen Abnormal cholesterol and triglycerides Newer beta blockers, such as carvedilol (Coreg) and nebivolol (Bystolic), are less likely to affect your cholesterol levels. The older beta blocker drugs that can affect your cholesterol levels usually won't be one of the first drugs you're given as a treatment for high blood pressure. But, older beta blocker drugs are useful in specific situations, such as preventing recurrent heart disease or managing heart failure. In some cases, older beta blockers can be helpful in treating people with a high risk of cardiovascular disease or people who have migraines. If you' Continue reading >>

Drugs That Raise Your Blood Sugar

Drugs That Raise Your Blood Sugar

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you probably know about the different types of food and drink that can increase your blood sugar (glucose). But did you know some prescription medicines can do this as well? This is why you should tell everyone who prescribes medicines for you—doctors, dentists, or nurse practitioners—that you have diabetes. At the same time, it’s important for the doctor or nurse practitioner managing your diabetes treatment to know of any new medicines you may be taking that were prescribed by someone else. There are many medicines that can raise blood sugar and cause hyperglycemia, or blood sugar levels above normal. If you aren’t sure about a medication you’ve been prescribed, ask your doctor or pharmacist if it will affect your blood sugar before you start taking it. Common medicines that raise blood sugar levels include: Steroids Corticosteroids, called steroids for short, are often prescribed to treat conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma, among others. While they can be very effective in managing those types of problems, they can also wreak havoc on your blood sugar levels. Luckily, when the steroid doses decrease or when you're told you can stop taking the medication, usually your sugar levels will return to their previous readings. Some examples of steroids include prednisone and prednisolone. Antipsychotics Patients with certain mental illnesses, like schizophrenia, rely on medications such as antipsychotics to manage their symptoms. While these medicines can be life saving, they are also known to raise blood sugar levels, especially clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo, Versacloz), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zyprexa, Zydis), risperidone (Risperdal), aripiprazole (Abilify), quetiapine fumarate (Seroquel), and ziprasidone (Geo Continue reading >>

Metoprolol For High Blood Pressure Raised Blood Sugar Levels

Metoprolol For High Blood Pressure Raised Blood Sugar Levels

Metoprolol for High Blood Pressure Raised Blood Sugar Levels Millions of people take metoprolol for high blood pressure. Do they know that many experts doubt the drug is appropriate as a first-line treatment? Can it raise blood sugar? Metoprolol is a beta blocker heart medicine. It is perennially on the doctors top 10 hit parade of most prescribed medicines. Over the last decade, roughly 70 million prescriptions were dispensed each year. This medication is prescribed for chest pain (angina pectoris) heart failure, and after a patient has had a heart attack. We suspect, though, that the majority of dispensed prescriptions are for metoprolol for high blood pressure. How good is it and what are the risks? This reader is concerned about blood sugar: Can Metoprolol for High Blood Pressure Raise Blood Glucose? Q. I have been taking metoprolol for my high blood pressure for the past five years. Since then, my blood sugar has ranged between 108 and 111. I never had blood sugar levels that high before taking metoprolol. My doctor is concerned. I believe that this beta blocker is raising my blood sugar. Are there any studies concerning such drugs and high blood sugar levels? A. Beta blockers can raise blood sugar ( Drug Intelligence & Clinical Pharmacy, April 1985 ). This is not a side effect that is generally recognized by health professionals as a problem. The official prescribing information mentions unstable diabetes almost as an afterthought and includes the disclaimer that a drug relationship is not clear. Other researchers acknowledge that older blockers like metoprolol: are generally considered to worsen metabolic control in patients with diabetes ( Cardiovascular Diabetology, May 25, 2010 ). The exception seems to be carvedilol (Coreg). It may improve blood sugar manage Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Beta-blockers: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Beta-blockers: What You Need To Know

People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease or stroke at an earlier age than the general population. One reason for this is that high glucose levels increase your risk of high blood pressure (hypertension). According to the American Diabetes Association, almost one in three American adults has high blood pressure. Two out of three people with diabetes have high blood pressure. Type 2 Diabetes and Hypertension High blood pressure doesn’t necessarily cause symptoms. You may feel just fine, but don’t let that fool you. Your heart is working harder than it should. It’s a serious condition, especially for people with diabetes. High blood pressure puts a lot of extra stress on your body. Over time, it can cause hardening of the arteries. It can also damage your brain, kidneys, eyes, and other organs. Treating High Blood Pressure If you have high blood pressure, your doctor may want to try other methods of treating it before turning to beta-blockers. These may include lifestyle changes and taking better control of blood glucose levels. The decision to use medication, including beta-blockers, will depend on your personal medical history. A 2015 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association recommends drug therapy with a blood pressure reading of above 140 systolic and above 90 diastolic (140/90). For people with diabetes, lowering high blood pressure reduces the risk of developing cardiovascular problems, kidney disease, and neuropathy. Beta-Blockers Beta-blockers (beta-adrenergic blocking agents) are a class of prescription drug. They are used to treat a variety of conditions such as glaucoma, migraines, and anxiety disorders. They are also used to treat heart failure and high blood pressure. High blood pressure can increase your risk for hear Continue reading >>

Influence Of Beta-blocking Drugs On Glucose Metabolism In Hypertensive, Non-diabetic Patients.

Influence Of Beta-blocking Drugs On Glucose Metabolism In Hypertensive, Non-diabetic Patients.

Influence of beta-blocking drugs on glucose metabolism in hypertensive, non-diabetic patients. Groop L , Ttterman KJ , Harno K , Gordin A . Two beta-blocking agents, non-selective propranolol and beta 1-selective metoprolol, were investigated with respect to their effect on glucose metabolism in 11 hypertensive, non-diabetic patients. They were randomly treated for two weeks in a double-blind cross-over manner with propranolol, metoprolol and placebo. Both drugs caused a small but significant increase in basal blood glucose values as compared with placebo (p less than 0.01). Metoprolol increased the blood glucose concentrations during the first 10 min of an i.v. glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) as compared with placebo (p less than 0.02) and propranolol (p less than 0.05). Propranolol raised only the blood glucose values during the later part of the IVGTT (p less than 0.01). The increase in blood glucose concentrations was, however, not associated with significant changes in peripheral insulin levels. The mean basal glucagon concentrations were lower during propranolol and metoprolol than during placebo (p less than 0.01). Propranolol also induced a more pronounced reduction of plasma glucagon than placebo (p less than 0.05) at 10 min of the IVGTT. The mean basal free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations were lower during propranolol (p less than 0.001) and metoprolol (p less than 0.05) than during placebo. Both drugs decreased the plasma levels of FFA during the first 10 min of the IVGTT as compared with placebo (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.02, respectively). Pharmacological doses of propranolol and metoprolol increased blood glucose concentrations, decreased plasma glucagon and FFA concentrations, but had no effect on serum insulin levels in hypertensive, non-diabeti Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Metoprolol Side Effects

Metoprolol Side Effects

What Is Metoprolol (Lopressor)? Metoprolol is the generic form of the brand-name drug Lopressor, prescribed to treat high blood pressure and prevent angina (chest pain). Metoprolol is a type of medication called a beta blocker. It works by relaxing blood vessels and slowing heart rate, which improves blood flow and lowers blood pressure. Metoprolol can also improve the likelihood of survival after a heart attack. Doctors prescribe the long-acting form of the drug (Toprol XL) to treat heart failure. In some cases, a doctor may prescribe metoprolol for an irregular heartbeat. A 2013 study found that, when used with amiodarone (another heart medication), metoprolol could effectively prevent atrial fibrillation (a type of rhythm disorder of the heart) after heart surgery. Sometimes metoprolol is used to treat conditions other than heart problems, including migraine headaches or movement disorders caused by drugs for treating mental illness. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved metoprolol in 1978 under the brand name Lopressor. Today, it's still a widely used drug: Doctors write more than 27 million prescriptions for the drug each year. Metoprolol Warnings Metoprolol controls high blood pressure and chest pain, but it's not a cure for these conditions. It may also take a few weeks before you experience the full benefits of the drug. If you have certain allergies, your reactions may be worse while you are taking metoprolol. You also might not respond to your usual dose of epinephrine. People with asthma, a slow heart rate, or heart failure should not use beta blockers, including metoprolol. Doctors should prescribe this drug with caution for older people and those with diabetes. Before taking metoprolol, be sure to tell your doctor if you have a slow heart rate or Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Will You Have High Blood Sugar With Metoprolol Tartrate - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have High Blood Sugar With Metoprolol Tartrate - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 30 year old woman who takes Levofloxacin NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

One of the main goals of any diabetes control regimen is keeping blood glucose levels in the near-normal range. The cornerstones of most plans to achieve that goal include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and taking insulin or other medicines as necessary. However, it’s not uncommon for people with diabetes to have other medical conditions that also require taking medicines, and sometimes these drugs can interfere with efforts to control blood glucose. A few medicines, including some commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure and heart disease, have even been implicated as the cause of some cases of diabetes. This article lists some of the medicines that can worsen blood glucose control, the reasons they have that effect, the usual magnitude of the blood glucose changes, as well as the pros and cons of using these drugs in people who have diabetes. Where the problems occur To understand how various medicines can worsen blood glucose control, it helps to understand how insulin, the hormone responsible for lowering blood glucose, works in the body. Insulin is released from the beta cells of the pancreas in response to rising levels of glucose in the bloodstream, rising levels of a hormone called GLP-1 (which is released from the intestines in response to glucose), and signals from the nerve connections to the pancreas. The secretion of insulin occurs in two phases: a rapid first phase and a delayed second phase. Both of these phases are dependent on levels of potassium and calcium in the pancreas. Insulin acts on three major organs: the liver, the muscles, and fat tissue. In the liver, insulin enhances the uptake of glucose and prevents the liver from forming new glucose, which it normally does to maintain fasting glucose levels. In muscle and f Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: Beta Blockers Worsen Blood Sugar--may Cause Diabetes

Diabetes Update: Beta Blockers Worsen Blood Sugar--may Cause Diabetes

Beta Blockers Worsen Blood Sugar--May Cause Diabetes Many people know that it is a bad idea for anyone who takes insulin or a sulfonylurea drug to take a beta blocker. This is because it has long been known that these drugs block the counter-regulatory response that prevents a dangerous hypo or--if it cannot prevent the hypo--at least gives the victim some warning that one is coming by causing shakes and pounding pulse. Now evidence from a huge study of almost 20,000 people has learned that beta blockers are dangerous to anyone with any blood sugar abnormality. The study is Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure Lowering Arm (ASCOT-BPLA,). It was published in Diabetes Care in May. Determinants of new-onset diabetes among 19,257 hypertensive patients randomized in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial--Blood Pressure Lowering Arm and the relative influence of antihypertensive medication. It concluded: "Baseline FPG >5 mmol/l, BMI, and use of an atenolol +/- diuretic regimen were among the major determinants of NOD [Non-insulin dependent diabetes i.e. Type 2] in hypertensive patients." An analysis of the study (which is still only available as an abstract to non-subscribers) published in Irish Medical News explains "Hypertensive patients allocated to amlodipine and perindopril were found 34% less likely to develop NOD [Type 2] compared with those allocated to the -blocker/diuretic combination." Diabetes in Control adds the following: "Says Dr Anoop Misra, director and head (diabetes and metabolic diseases) Fortis Hospitals: "In patients with hypertension, beta blocker drugs are no longer frontline therapy. These drugs may not only increase blood sugar levels in those who don't have diabetes, but may worsen sugar control in those with diabetes an Continue reading >>

Metoprolol And Low Blood Sugar

Metoprolol And Low Blood Sugar

Heart Disease Home > Metoprolol and Low Blood Sugar Blood sugar levels may be affected by metoprolol, and low blood sugar is more likely to occur in infants or children and people who have kidney disease or diabetes. Early symptoms that may indicate low blood sugar levels include dizziness, sweating, and extreme hunger. Since low blood sugar levels can cause serious or life-threatening complications, it is important to know the possible signs and what to do if they occur. Metoprolol ( Lopressor , Toprol XL ) belongs to a group of medications known as beta blockers . Low blood sugar levels have been reported in people taking such drugs. Normal doses of metoprolol probably do not significantly increase the risk of low blood sugar for most people. However, Toprol -XL can make low blood sugar less noticeable (which can be dangerous, especially for people with diabetes ). This potential side effect of beta blockers is more common in infants and children, while fasting (such as before surgery), after prolonged exercise, or in people with kidney disease or diabetes. Symptoms of Low Blood Sugar With Metoprolol Low blood sugar symptoms can vary, depending on a number of factors, including how low the blood sugar levels are. Examples of early symptoms may include: Continue reading >>

Toprol Xl (metoprolol Succinate) Drug Overview And Uses For Patients And Caregivers At Rxlist

Toprol Xl (metoprolol Succinate) Drug Overview And Uses For Patients And Caregivers At Rxlist

cold medicines, stimulant medicines, or diet pills; anti-malaria medications such as chloroquine (Aralen) or hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil, Quineprox); medicine to treat depression or mental illness, such as bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), paroxetine (Paxil), thioridazine (Mellaril), and others; an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);; a diabetes medication such as insulin, glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase, Glynase), glipizide (Glucotrol), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), or metformin (Glucophage); a heart medication such as diltiazem (Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Diltia, Diltzac, Taztia, Tiazac), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quin-G), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan, Tarka); or medicine for asthma or other breathing disorders, such as albuterol (Ventolin, Proventil), bitolterol (Tornalate), metaproterenol (Alupent), pirbuterol (Maxair), terbutaline (Brethaire, Brethine, Bricanyl), and theophylline (Aquaphyllin, Asmalix, Elixophyllin, Theolair, Theosol). This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with metoprolol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Your pharmacist can provide more information about metoprolol. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is Continue reading >>

New Beta Blocker May Help Diabetic Patients With High Blood Pressure

New Beta Blocker May Help Diabetic Patients With High Blood Pressure

New beta blocker may help diabetic patients with high blood pressure A medication that is commonly used to control high blood pressure does not raise blood sugar levels in diabetics who also have high blood pressure, according to researchers from Rush University Medical Center . The results of the study appear in the November 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and were presented today at the 2004 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. Beta blockers have been shown to be effective at lowering high blood pressure but many physicians have been reluctant to prescribe them to patients with diabetes because some beta-blockers have been shown to raise blood sugar levels in diabetics. Especially at risk are the estimated 47 million people with metabolic syndrome, a combination of several risk factors in one person that includes, but is not limited to, high blood pressure, insulin dependence or glucose intolerance, and obesity. "The results of this study suggest that physicians treating diabetic patients may want to consider the role that a newer beta-blocker such as carvedilol could play in managing certain cardiovascular risk factors and components of the metabolic syndrome ," said Dr. George L. Bakris, director, hypertension research center at Rush University Medical Center. "By improving these crucial risk factors, carvedilol could, theoretically, improve overall outcomes in this high-risk patient population." Bakris was the principal investigator of this 1,235-patient study, which is known as GEMINI (Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol - Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives). Bakris and colleagues compared the effects of carvedilol to metoprolol tartrate in diabetic, hypertensive patients. Patients were randomized to Continue reading >>

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