diabetestalk.net

Does Metformin Increase Breast Size

Benefits Of Metformin In Reproductive-age Women

Benefits Of Metformin In Reproductive-age Women

Benefits of Metformin in Reproductive-Age Women Metformin in Reproductive Health, Pregnancy and Gynaecological Cancer: Established and Emerging Indications Sivalingam VN, Myers J, Nicholas S, Balen AH, Crosbie EJ Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine abnormality that affects women of reproductive age and can be diagnosed in 5%-10% of them. It is characterized by oligo-ovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries.[ 1 ] Insulin resistance plays an important role in its etiology. The liver and skeletal muscles are resistant to the actions of insulin, so in order to maintain euglycemia, insulin is overproduced. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF), however, act as a growth factor in the ovary and stimulate its androgen synthesis. Androgens are then responsible for hirsutism, acne, and arrested follicle development as well. Over 50% of women with PCOS are overweight or obese, which further augments insulin resistance. PCOS is not the only condition accompanied by insulin resistance. Being overweight or obese is also associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance, if left untreated, can ultimately result in glucose intolerance and even type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the known and potential benefits of metformin therapy in reproductive-age women. The benefits of metformin have been extensively studied among infertile women diagnosed with PCOS. The lack of regular ovulation is usually the primary cause of infertility among them. Clomiphene citrate is the typical first-line drug administered to induce follicle growth. Metformin is also frequently prescribed to help ovulation, although randomized trials have not shown superior results when compared with clomiphene. A systematic review found improved ovulation rates with met Continue reading >>

Breast Changes, Herbal Supplements, And On A Personal Note

Breast Changes, Herbal Supplements, And On A Personal Note

When I reviewed the Parfait Charlotte for GG+ cup sizes , I mentioned that my breasts had changed shape and size after taking an herbal supplement. Since then, I have received numerous comments and email messages asking what I was taking and to discuss my decision to pursue alternative medicine. To give the question a truly thoughtful answer requires me to divulge personal information about myself and my medical history. As this blog is a part of my business, I have wavered as to whether it would be beneficial to discuss something of this nature here, but ultimately I decided to share my struggles in the hopes they can help someone else find comfort. Almost as soon as my monstration . . . I mean, menstruation started, my Aunt Irma has been about as accurate as a broken watch. In fact, during my formative high school years I was convinced my period was a sentient being with whom I was clearly at war. Weeks would pass without so much as a single spot only to resurface for a month of on/off bleeding. When I was around 16, I started birth control to regulate my period, and the problem subsided. However, I struggled with the side effects of the prescription medication, especially with my weight. Even low dose options created issues for me. A few years ago, I was referred to a respected gynecologist, and he was absolutely amazing at identifying my issues and diagnosing problems quickly. In the end, we discovered I had Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Check out this great description from the Mayo Clinic : Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal disorder among women of reproductive age. The name of the condition comes from the appearance of the ovaries in most, but not all, women with the disorder enlarged and containing numerous small cysts located along the o Continue reading >>

Will You Have Breast Enlargement With Metformin Hydrochloride - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Breast Enlargement With Metformin Hydrochloride - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 49 year old woman who takes Claritin, Minocycline Hydrochloride, Ranitidine, Biaxin Xl, B12, Breo Ellipta NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding And Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (pcos)

Breastfeeding And Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (pcos)

Danielle G. Lemay, Olivia A. Ballard, Maria A. Hughes, Ardythe L. Morrow, Nelson D. Horseman, Laurie A. Nommsen-Rivers. RNA Sequencing of the Human Milk Fat Layer Transcriptome Reveals Distinct Gene Expression Profiles at Three Stages of Lactation . PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (7): e67531 Neville MC, Webb P, Ramanathan P, Mannino MP, Pecorini C, Monks J, Anderson SM, MacLean P. The insulin receptor plays an important role in secretory differentiation in the mammary gland . Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Nov 1;305(9):E1103-14. doi: 10.1152/ajpendo.00337.2013. Epub 2013 Aug 27. Shannon M, Wang Y. Polycystic ovarysyndrome: a common but often unrecognized condition . J Midwifery Womens Health 2012;57(3):221-30. Vanky E, IsaksenH, Moen MH, Carlsen SM. Breastfeeding in polycystic ovary syndrome . Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2008;87(5):531-5. Glueck CJ, Wang P. Metformin before and during pregnancy and lactation in polycystic ovary syndrome . Expert Opin Drug Saf. 2007 Mar;6(2):191-8. Nesmith H. PolycysticOvarian Syndrome (PCOS) and Lactation. Topics In Breastfeeding Set XVIII, Lactation Resource Centre, 2006 (November). Continue reading >>

For Pcos, 13 Side Effects Of Metformin You Should Know About

For Pcos, 13 Side Effects Of Metformin You Should Know About

Did you know that 10%- 25% of women who take Glucophage just don't feel well? They experience a general malaise, fatigue and occasional achiness that lasts for varying lengths of time. Malaise a warning signal for your doctor to closely monitor your body systems, including liver, kidneys, and GI tract. About one third of women on metformin experience gastrointestinal disturbances, including nausea, occasional vomiting and loose, more frequent bowel movements, or diarrhea. This problem occurs more often after meals rich in fats or sugars, so eating a healthier diet will help. The symptoms lessen over time, so if you can tolerate the GI upset for a few weeks, it may go away. Some women have found it helps to start with a very low dose and gradually increase it. Most people think that aside from possible gastrointestinal upset, there are no side effects from taking metformin, and thus you can take it for a very long time. This is not true! The sneakiest side effect of all is a vitamin B12 insufficiency. A substance formed in the stomach called "intrinsic factor" combines with B12 so that it can be transferred into the blood. Metformin interferes with the ability of your cells to absorb this intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex.(12) Over the long term, vitamin B12 insufficiency is a significant health risk. B12 is essential to the proper growth and function of every cell in your body. It's required for synthesis of DNA and for many crucial biochemical functions. There is also a link between B12 insufficiency and cardiovascular disease. According to some research, 10%-30% of patients show evidence of reduced vitamin B12 absorption. The Hospital de Clnicas de Porto Alegre in Brazil has shown that one of every three diabetics who takes metformin for at least a year have evide Continue reading >>

Pcos And Breast Underdevelopment - Page 3

Pcos And Breast Underdevelopment - Page 3

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. aaaahh, birth control pills, lol, ive tried many different ones and all they did was make my mood swings hit the roof, and make me gain weight, but my breast stayed the same size, no matter how much weight i gained they dont wanna seem to budge from a AA cup!!!! =( xox That I was taking birth control may have just been a coincidence, but I didn't have boobs till I was 25 and NO ONE believes they are real now! LOL At least they are admired (I mean someone MUST have been looking to even notice their size increase, right?!?!?) That I was taking birth control may have just been a coincidence, but I didn't have boobs till I was 25 BCP do actually increase breast size in some women, thats why i changed mine for a higher level of estrogen a few years ago, but like i said before, it did nothing for me except all the bad side effects =( im now on Co-cyprindiol tablets to help with my hirsutism and acne, but also acts a contraceptive.ive only just started the course of tablets and im currently half way through the first packet, so time will tell whether or not they will actually work and whether i will gain or lose weight on them, ive researched them online and some women gain weight and some lose weight.hopefully i wont gain any as im already slightly overweight, lol. unfortunatly,there is nothing that will help me in the breast department except parting with alot of money and going under the knife =( I'm honestly so glad to have this forum! It's sort of therapeutic to hear other people that have gone through similar i Continue reading >>

Is Breast Enlargement A Side Effect Of Metformin ? ( Factmed.com )

Is Breast Enlargement A Side Effect Of Metformin ? ( Factmed.com )

Introduction This page is designed to help you determine the relationship, if any, between METFORMIN and BREAST ENLARGEMENT. In doing so, we compare METFORMIN with other drugs that cause BREAST ENLARGEMENT, to help you evaluate whether or not METFORMIN causes BREAST ENLARGEMENT. Likewise, this page shows the most highly-reported side effects of METFORMIN, so you can see if BREAST ENLARGEMENT ranks among METFORMIN's most well-known side effects. Reports of METFORMIN causing BREAST ENLARGEMENT: 1 Reports of any side effect of METFORMIN : 22852 Percentage of METFORMIN patients where BREAST ENLARGEMENT is a reported side effect: 0.0044% FDA reports of any drug causing BREAST ENLARGEMENT : 1053 Average percentage for all medicated patients where BREAST ENLARGEMENT is reported as a complication: 0.0066% Physician opinion on METFORMIN as adverse event culprit: Overall opinion for all reports of this drug: Most frequent diagnoses/indications for prescribing METFORMIN: TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS ( 1542 patients ) PRODUCT USED FOR UNKNOWN INDICATION ( 1149 patients ) DRUG USE FOR UNKNOWN INDICATION ( 736 patients ) DIABETES MELLITUS NON-INSULIN-DEPENDENT ( 264 patients ) GLUCOSE TOLERANCE IMPAIRED ( 90 patients ) Is Metformin safe if you already have Macular Degeneration? I definately think Metformin (after about 6 years of use -2 500 mg tabs in AM/PM) have started to cause problems with my connective tissues. First it was Achilles tendonitis and now what seems like Tennis or Golfers elbow. Even my wrist have been hurting. I have done nothing to injure these areas. Also after running, I can tell I have muscle tears in my calves. I don't think people realize how Metformin really affects the whole body. I also was extremely B-12 deficient and anemic due to Metformin. I have to convi Continue reading >>

Metformin In Treating Pcos (polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)

Metformin In Treating Pcos (polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)

Summary: Metformin is usually considered a first-line treatment in PCOS (PolyCystic Ovarian Syndrome). Clinical studies show that metformin can improve your bodys insulin sensitivity which can have some positive effects on the symptoms of PCOS. However, metformin does have side effects. Also, some women have reported great results by altering their diets. Dear Curtis: Ive had PCOS for years. Recently my doctor started me on metformin to help with the symptoms. How effective is metformin in treating PCOS? Any side effects I should be worried about? First of all, let me say something for the benefit of other folks who might be reading this, PolyCycstic Ovarian Syndrome is not a cut-and-dry disease. Its complicated and there is a pretty poor understanding of what exactly causes it. Yes, we know its a hormone imbalance. But what leads to that imbalance. Personally, I have my own theory which Ill touch on in a bit. But, because I want to focus on the use of metformin in PCOS lets start there. At the end of the day metformin is designed to do one thing and one thing only: improve your insulin sensitivity. When you take metformin it actually increases the amount of sugar that is taken up and utilized by your body. In someone who has insulin resistance their cells dont recognize insulin as well and arent able to properly handle the sugar that is in the blood. Its important to note that this is only one of the actions of metformin in the body. The other two major ones include lowering the amount of sugar your liver produces and as well as lowering the amount of sugar that is absorbed in your intestines. Now, what does all this have to do with PCOS? While its not known for sure, the most common theory on the probably cause of PCOS revolves around hyperinsulinemia or, in laymans Continue reading >>

Science You Can Use: Could Taking Metformin In Pregnancy Increase Breastfeeding Success Of Women With Pcos?

Science You Can Use: Could Taking Metformin In Pregnancy Increase Breastfeeding Success Of Women With Pcos?

Science You Can Use: Could taking metformin in pregnancy increase breastfeeding success of women with PCOS? Hormonal causes of low milk supply are, in my mind, the final frontier of our understanding of milk supply problems. We know a lot about the normal course of lactation in women without hormonal or metabolic imbalances, and how to protect and rebuild milk supply when one of many Booby Traps drives things off course. But for those who do have hormonal imbalances and suffer milk supply problems, we know too little and have too few solutions to offer. So I was very interested to see a new study published this year by a Norwegian research team investigating the effect of metformin use in pregnancy on breastfeeding outcomes among women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). PCOS, a hormonal imbalance affecting as many as 15% of all women, has for some time been implicated in milk supply problems. But its a slippery issue some women with PCOS have dramatic milk supply problems, some dont, and some even have an oversupply. The theory of its effect on lactation is that in some cases it may cause the underdevelopment of the breast during pregnancy (and possibly even in puberty), making less glandular tissue available for milk production and resulting in low milk supply. One hope has been if that women took metformin, a drug which reduces PCOS symptoms, during pregnancy, they might be more likely to experience normal breast growth, setting them up to then develop a full milk supply. The study published this year, an offshoot of a larger randomized trial (metformin vs. placebo), looked for associations between metformin use during pregnancy and 1) breast size growth, and 2) duration of breastfeeding among 186 women with PCOS. It found: There were no differences in the durati Continue reading >>

Metformin To Augment Low Milk Supply (malms) Study (malms)

Metformin To Augment Low Milk Supply (malms) Study (malms)

Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Most new mothers in the United States will start off breastfeeding. For some mothers, despite following best practices, they are not able to meet their breastfeeding goals due to unexplained low milk supply. At the same time, nearly 1 in 4 new mothers are pre-diabetic (elevated blood sugar, but not yet diabetic). My progression of research suggests that the same metabolic factors causing pre-diabetes may also be causing low milk supply. Metformin is a widely prescribed drug to treat high blood sugar. This study is a preliminary, small scale randomized trial designed to test for a trend in the hypothesis that metformin is safe and potentially effective in treating low milk supply in insulin resistant and pre-diabetic mothers. Low Milk Supply Pre-diabetes Insulin Resistance Suppressed Lactation Behavioral: Standard care Drug: Metformin Drug: Placebo Through a progression of research, the PI has developed the central hypothesis that waning insulin secretion in the context of insulin resistance is an important cause of low milk supply. The specific aim of the research described in this protocol is to enact a small-scale randomized placebo-controlled trial (RCT) that will inform a future larger double-masked RCT of adjuvant metformin treatment versus placebo for early postpartum low milk supply in women with evidence of insulin resistance based on the presence of at least one of the following: elevated fasting glucose (FPG, defined as >95 g/dL), history of polycystic ovary syndrome, history of gestational diabetes, or current abdominal obesity. The pilot study is designed to demonstrate feasibility, obtain variance estimates, and test for an tr Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin side effects for PCOS need to be understood as potential side effects of metformin may impact a woman’s chances of getting pregnant. What kind of metformin side effects can I expect to see if I have PCOS? When sufferers of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome endeavor to rebel against the disease that has greatly compromised their reproductive potential, many turn to metformin for PCOS. While Metformin was originally conceived to help diabetes patients better manage their blood sugar levels, the properties that help these people also do a number on the destructive capabilities of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (a). Metformin decreases the destructive effects that androgen and insulin has on the ovaries of PCOS patients by reducing the production of the former and increasing the body’s sensitivity to the latter (1). It accomplishes this by reducing the production of glucose in the liver via gluconeogenesis, thereby reducing the aggressive insulin response in the bodies of PCOS patients that then gives rise to androgen production (b). With any compound that has been shown to work well against any given medical condition, it is always important to keep in mind the potential side effects, which are factors that are often swept by the wayside when folks clamor over the latest wonder drug. Similarly, those using metformin for PCOS need to be armed with the knowledge of the symptoms that mark the potential side effects that they might experience, which ones are relatively harmless, and most important of all, the ones that denote a life-threatening reaction that requires immediate medical attention. While incidents of this magnitude are typically rare, it is vital that you are aware nonetheless, as it is better to switch to a PCOS treatment that is more suitable for you than Continue reading >>

La Leche League Mother-to-mother Forums

La Leche League Mother-to-mother Forums

@llli*kmm3709 said: February 5th, 201202:34 PM I just found out that I am pregnant with my 2nd baby (Hooray! After 7 months of TTC!) -- With my first, I definitely had some supply issues with my breastmilk.. My right breast seemed to do just fine (although the milk was nearly clear -- no fat?), but my left breast produced practically nothing. Now this pregnancy, my right breast is starting to change a bit (veins are more visible, breast seems full, tender, nipple changes), but the left is not doing any of the same things! I would like to have a more successful nursing experience with baby #2! I have heard that there are ways to increase the glandular tissue (which may also increase the milk fat as well?? (it took my daughter nearly 3 months to get up to 9 lbs...she would born 8lbs 5oz!)). I've read a little bit about taking alfalfa, but there are so many mixed reviews on whether or not it is safe to take during pregnancy. Does anyone have any personal experience with this? Or have any more information? Or other suggestions of what may help? @llli*aprilsmagic said: February 5th, 201209:24 PM I would suggest the book Making More Milk p, as there is a section in there about increasing glandular tissue. Alfalfa is mentioned in there. You might want to visit with an IBCLC and see what might have gone wrong last time, see what you can do now, and what to consider for the next child. FWIW, I have EPed for the last 12+ months and during this time have learned that my right side, on a good day, make 8 oz in 24 hours. My left makes the vast majority of my babies' milk supply. I have heard of moms who only had one breast. So it is possible to nurse off just one side. Clear milk is kind of normal to some extent. My own milk was "thin looking" at the beginning of our journey. It wa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment May Increase Breast Density

Diabetes Treatment May Increase Breast Density

Diabetes Treatment May Increase Breast Density With commentary by Zorana Andersen, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Southern Denmark; Gerald Bernstein, MD, former president of the American Diabetes Association and coordinator of the Friedman Diabetes Program at Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, and others. Women who take insulin to control their diabetes are more likely to have dense breasts, a risk factor for breast cancer, than women who take non-insulin medications or follow lifestyle measures to control their diabetes, according to new research. "Diabetic women taking insulin need their medication, but may possibly benefit from additional screening for breast cancer," said study leader Zorana Andersen, PhD, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Southern Denmark in Esjberg. She presented the results of her study March 8 at the 10th European Breast Cancer Conference. Studies presented at medical conferences are typically considered preliminary until the research is published in peer-reviewed medical journals. "We know that diabetes is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer,'' Dr. Andersen says. However, she and other experts can't explain why that is so. "The role of insulin has been debated," she says. Insulin is a ''growth promoting factor for all body tissues," Dr. Andersen says. So, its plausible that it can increase the amount of tissue in the breast known as epithelial or stromal tissue, and boost the overall breast density. When breasts are dense, they have little fatty tissue. Doctors classify breast density into four categories, from nearly all fatty to extremely dense. In the middle are breasts that have some dense, some fatty tissues. On a mammogram, dense breast tissue shows up as white, and so d Continue reading >>

Five Things You Need To Know About Pcos And Breastfeeding

Five Things You Need To Know About Pcos And Breastfeeding

Written by guest author Suzanne Munson, MS, Director of Product Development for Fairhaven Health, LLC Over the past few decades, awareness about PCOS has increased dramatically. As a result, women and health care providers are now familiar with many of the tell-tale symptoms of this syndrome: acne, male-pattern hair loss, excess facial and body hair, irregular menstrual cycles, insulin resistance, and ovarian cysts. PCOS is now recognized as a leading cause of fertility issues in women, and, it is known that if left untreated, PCOS can cause type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer. And, thanks to the work of Amy Medling, founder of PCOS Diva, women with PCOS are learning that they can successfully manage PCOS with diet and lifestyle changes. But, despite our growing understanding of PCOS, there is still very little discussion about how PCOS impacts breastfeeding. If you are trying-to-conceive or are already pregnant and planning to breastfeed your bundle of joy, here are 5 things you need to know about PCOS and breastfeeding. As early as the 1940s, researchers documented a lower than normal amount of glandular tissue in the breasts of women with PCOS, which impacts both the appearance and functionality of the breasts. Due to this lack of glandular tissue, the breasts of women with PCOS often have a characteristic appearance: small (almost pre-pubescent in size) and cone-shaped, with a wide space between the breasts. Alternatively, some women with PCOS have very large breasts, filled mostly with fatty tissue instead of glandular tissue. But, while it is has been known for decades that PCOS negatively impacts breast development, we still don’t know exactly why this happens and how it impacts the ability of women with PCOS to breastfeed successfully. Wha Continue reading >>

Phase Ii Study Of Metformin For Reduction Of Obesity-associated Breast Cancer Risk: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

Phase Ii Study Of Metformin For Reduction Of Obesity-associated Breast Cancer Risk: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

Phase II study of metformin for reduction of obesity-associated breast cancer risk: a randomized controlled trial protocol We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Phase II study of metformin for reduction of obesity-associated breast cancer risk: a randomized controlled trial protocol Jessica A. Martinez, Pavani Chalasani, [...], and H-H. Sherry Chow Two-thirds of U.S. adult women are overweight or obese. High body mass index (BMI) and adult weight gain are risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including postmenopausal breast cancer. The higher postmenopausal breast cancer risk in women with elevated BMI is likely to be attributable to related metabolic disturbances including altered circulating sex steroid hormones and adipokines, elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines, and insulin resistance. Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug that has demonstrated favorable effects on metabolic disturbances and as such may lead to lower breast cancer risk in obese women. Further, the anti-proliferative effects of metformin suggest it may decrease breast density, an accepted biomarker of breast cancer risk. This is a Phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of metformin in overweight/obese premenopausal women who have elements of metabolic syndrome. Eligible participants will be randomized to receive metformin 850mg BID (n = 75) or placebo (n = 75) for 12months. The primary endpoint is change in breas Continue reading >>

More in diabetes