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Does Metformin Help With Menstrual Cramps

Irregular Periods - Management & Treatment

Irregular Periods - Management & Treatment

Although some women with PCOS have regular periods, high levels of androgens ('male' hormones) and excess insulin can disrupt the monthly cycle of ovulation and menstruation. If you have PCOS, your periods may be 'irregular' or stop altogether. The average menstrual cycle is 28 days with one ovulation when eggs are released, but anywhere between 21 and 35 days is considered 'normal'. An 'irregular' period cycle is defined as either: Eight or less menstrual cycles per year Menstrual cycles longer than 35 days Some women with PCOS also experience heavier or lighter bleeding during their menstrual cycle. Regular periods help to prevent excess thickening of the lining of the uterus (womb). Long gaps between periods can lead to abnormal cells building up inside the womb. It is important you have at least four cycles per year to avoid a build up that may include abnormal cells. Treatment options Hormonal contraception Your doctor can prescribe hormonal contraception to help regulate your menstrual periods. The medication can also reduce menstrual cramps, acne and excess hair growth. These medications include: A low–dose oral contraceptive pill ('the pill') Progesterone which stimulates the uterus and induces bleeding Hormonal implants Vaginal contraceptive rings Intra-uterine devices containing progesterone How they work The oestrogen and progesterone in hormonal contraception act to override the body's normal hormonal control of the menstrual cycle and ovulation. The oral contraceptive pill works by "switching the ovaries off", which means that when a woman is taking the pill the production of hormones such as testosterone is greatly reduced. The pill also increases the body's production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), which binds to the main androgen testosterone Continue reading >>

Metformin And Menstrual Cramps

Metformin And Menstrual Cramps

672 discussions around the web mention both Metformin (brand name: Glucophage, Glumetza) is a medication used primarily for diabetes. It is an oral hypoglycemic medication. It lowers blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetics by facilitating the entrance of glucose in the tissues and reducing the amount made by the liver. It also helps delay the development of many complications linked to diabetes. It can also be used for other conditions such as weight loss and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Are you (or someone you care for) currently taking this drug? Clomid vs. Metformin Provera vs. Metformin Glucophage vs. Metformin Femara vs. Metformin Byetta vs. Metformin Menstrual Cramps and Pain Metformin and PCOS Menstrual Cramps and Cramping Metformin and Diabetes Menstrual Cramps and Menstrual Period Issues Metformin and Clomid Menstrual Cramps and Spotting Metformin and Weight Loss Menstrual Cramps and Contractions Metformin and Pregnancy Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best Continue reading >>

What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?

What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?

Everyday Health Women's Health Premenstrual Syndrome The excessive hormonal production associated with PCOS can interfere with a woman's ability to ovulate and it may also lead to skin and weight problems, and excess hair growth. Discover treatment options that may help. Sign Up for Our Women's Health Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Many people arent aware of polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, but its not uncommon the condition affects 5 percent to 10 percent of women of childbearing age. PCOS interferes with a woman's menstrual cycle and her ability to release eggs through monthly ovulation, and it is the most common cause of female infertility . PCOS develops because a woman's body produces excessive levels of androgens, which are sometimes called "male hormones," but are also naturally produced by females. When androgen levels are too high, it can interfere with the release of eggs through ovulation. Heres something else to consider: While researchers havent proved that being overweight or obese will cause PCOS, many women who have PCOS do carry excess weight. It's not clear what causes a woman to develop PCOS, either, but researchers believe these factors may play a part: Genetics. PCOS tends to run in families, so if your mother or sister has PCOS, you are at higher risk of developing it. High insulin levels. Women with PCOS tend to have high levels of insulin, which is thought to increase the production of androgens. Since excessive production of androgens can affect many areas of your body, PCOS symptoms vary considerably. PCOS symptoms may include: Missed periods, or an irregular menstrual cycle . The excessive level of androgens that is associated with PCOS can Continue reading >>

Pcos - Very Heavy And Painful Periods

Pcos - Very Heavy And Painful Periods

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Message Board HealthBoards > Women > Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) > PCOS - Very heavy and painful periods Im 19 and was diagnosed with Polycystic ovarian syndrome (pcos) about 2 years ago now. My doctors have tried me on the pill and metformin, neither of them worked, metformin did nothing and the pill gave me excrutiating pain in my stomach and back, however for the last 2 months I have got my periods but they have just been so heavy and painfull. Im changing my pad and tampax at least every 45mins to an hour, its starting to effect my everyday life I cant even go to work. Do you think I should get checked, is anyone else going through this. Would aprrecitate any help, many thanks xx Re: PCOS - Very heavy and painfull periods x I've never been checked for PCOS, but I am a type 2 diabetic so its quite common for diabetics to have PCOS also, I am on metformin for my diabetes. My periods are awful, agony for first 2 days to the point that I struggle with everyday life and have to take very strong pain killers every 4 hours and extremely heavy, I have given up with tampons and towels as they just arn't enough for those first two days. I now use a mooncup, which you may have heard of, the idea of it isn't too nice but the capacity is so much more, you should be easily able to go 6-8 hours without emptying it and any leakage - they are weird to begin with but as with everything . they get easier with time. I am 36 now but only started getting bad periods about 4 years ago, suppose I'll never know why. I have mentioned my problems to my doc without any help, but if you have been diagnosed with PCOS they should help, also using the cup, it has a measure so you could try that for a few months and go back to the doc with a better idea of exa Continue reading >>

Anyone Experiencing Pain From Taking Metformin?

Anyone Experiencing Pain From Taking Metformin?

Anyone Experiencing Pain From Taking Metformin? Thank you. I've tried time release, regular & the liquid, Riomet. I seem to have trouble no matter the version. HEALTH_NOW There is another post on here, she said she was giving time release and that almost completely took care of her problems. Yes I've had some of those symptoms & others. Problem with taking many medications is figuring out the ones causing the problem & wondering if it is the combination rather than just one med. Very frustrating especially since no doctor helping so I'm trying to do it on my own. This has been an interesting week. I had my diabetes class tuesday and it was really good. I ended up asking about all of these symptoms I have been having for 3 years and the doctor said all these symptoms aren't from diabetes..He told me to stop Metformin for 2 weeks and see how I feel? The next day a lot of the symptoms went away! Wow! I have been going through this for 3 years. Since I have been eating good and have lost 7 lbs now, my A1C went from 7.5 to 7. I went to the doctor today and that was an interesting experience, different doctor than the doctor at my diabetes class. It turns out I have asthma. My echocardiogram was good. Here are some of the symptoms I was having numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak diarrhea, or a metallic taste in the mouth may occur. actic acidosis. Symptoms include: tiredness. unusual muscle pain. trouble breathing. unusual sleepiness. dizziness or lightheadedness. ... low blood sugar. Symptoms include: headache. weakness. confusion. shaking or feeling jittery. drowsiness. dizziness. I know this is an old post, but I've been suffering all year with feeling hot even in winter & with ac in summer, burning back sensation, b Continue reading >>

Excessive Menstrual Pain Or Dysmenorrhea And Pcos

Excessive Menstrual Pain Or Dysmenorrhea And Pcos

Is excessive menstrual pain interfering with your life? Most women deal with the dull cramping pain (dysmenorrhea) in their lower abdomen during their period which can be quite unpleasant. However, about 10 percent of women have pain so excruciating every month it seriously hinders their daily lives.2 Menstrual cramps can actually be scientifically measured within the uterus, and the difference between mild and severe dysmenorrhea is considerable. The readings for normal periods are low pressure (50-80 mm HG) and can show 1-4 contractions every 10 minutes. A woman who has dysmenorrhea can produce readings of high pressure (over 400 mm HG) with contractions less than 15 seconds apart.5 Women can have two types of dysmenorrhea which have different underlying causes: Primary dysmenorrhea:? This period pain is the most common type and is not caused by any underlying disorder. It mostly affects adolescent girls and can start within six months to a year following the first occasion of menstruation. Primary dysmenorrhea can oftentimes be alleviated naturally with magnesium and calcium supplementation, and changes to lifestyle and dietary habits. Secondary dysmenorrhea:? Menstrual pain in this case is connected to some type of underlying medical condition (usually a disorder affecting the reproductive system) and can be relieved when the condition is treated. Secondary dysmenorrhea is most likely to develop in adulthood.2 Period pain is a common symptom of PCOS that can be considered to be an underlying condition, as well as endometriosis. If you have painful periods it’s an indication that it’s time to take action to heal your body. Causes Most women get menstrual cramps during their period but why are yours so painful? Most women get menstrual cramps during their period b Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin side effects for PCOS need to be understood as potential side effects of metformin may impact a woman’s chances of getting pregnant. What kind of metformin side effects can I expect to see if I have PCOS? When sufferers of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome endeavor to rebel against the disease that has greatly compromised their reproductive potential, many turn to metformin for PCOS. While Metformin was originally conceived to help diabetes patients better manage their blood sugar levels, the properties that help these people also do a number on the destructive capabilities of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (a). Metformin decreases the destructive effects that androgen and insulin has on the ovaries of PCOS patients by reducing the production of the former and increasing the body’s sensitivity to the latter (1). It accomplishes this by reducing the production of glucose in the liver via gluconeogenesis, thereby reducing the aggressive insulin response in the bodies of PCOS patients that then gives rise to androgen production (b). With any compound that has been shown to work well against any given medical condition, it is always important to keep in mind the potential side effects, which are factors that are often swept by the wayside when folks clamor over the latest wonder drug. Similarly, those using metformin for PCOS need to be armed with the knowledge of the symptoms that mark the potential side effects that they might experience, which ones are relatively harmless, and most important of all, the ones that denote a life-threatening reaction that requires immediate medical attention. While incidents of this magnitude are typically rare, it is vital that you are aware nonetheless, as it is better to switch to a PCOS treatment that is more suitable for you than Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a relatively common hormonal disorder that is one of the leading causes of infertility. Some women who have PCOS develop insulin resistance. This occurs when the cells of the body don’t respond well to a hormone known as insulin. Insulin allows the cells to take sugar (glucose) from the blood. If the cells don’t take in this sugar it leads to higher levels of glucose and insulin circulating through the body in the bloodstream. This, in turn, leads to increased levels of androgens (male hormones) which cause the classic symptoms of PCOS such as excess hair growth and more importantly in terms of fertility – lack of ovulation. Getting pregnant with PCOS can be possible with the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Here are the Top 10 facts about metformin use in PCOS patients: 1) Metformin is a medication that is primarily used to treat type 2 diabetes. It is marketed in the US under the names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza and Riomet. It is available as a tablet, extended-release tablet and a liquid. 2) With infertility patients, it is used not because the women with PCOS have diabetes (although they do have an increased risk of developing this disease), but because it acts on improving use of insulin by the cells of the body and therefore reducing the level of insulin in the blood. This can lead to improved ovulation, more regular menstrual cycles as well as a reduction in excessive hair growth, acne and weight gain. It may also slow down or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes later in life. 3) To determine if it would be helpful for a patient with PCOS to use Metformin, they are given a 2 Hour Glucose Tolerance Test. First, a fasting blood sample is drawn to determine a baseline glucose level. The patient t Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Metformin is a commonly used drug for managing type 2 diabetes. It is considered an effective treatment option for many people with diabetes, but is it safe for pregnant women? Metformin is a drug that helps to lower blood sugar. It is considered one of the best first line treatments for type 2 diabetes. A review posted to Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome notes that metformin helps to lower blood sugar levels, strengthens the endocrine system, improves insulin resistance, and reduces fat distribution in the body. Before taking any drugs, including metformin, a pregnant woman has to be absolutely sure that the drugs will not affect her or her baby. Effects of metformin use during and after pregnancy Some people are concerned about using metformin during and after pregnancy because it crosses the placenta. This means that when a pregnant woman takes metformin, so does her baby. However, the results of the few studies that have been carried out so far into the effects of taking metformin during pregnancy have been positive. A 2014 review posted to Human Reproduction Update found that the drug did not cause birth defects, complications, or diseases. The researchers did note, however, that larger studies should be carried out to make this evidence more conclusive. Metformin and gestational diabetes A separate review posted to Human Reproduction Update noted that women who took metformin to treat gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) gained less weight than women who took insulin. A 2-year follow-up study found that babies born to the women treated with metformin had less fat around their organs, which could make them less prone to insulin resistance later in life. This could mean that children who are exposed to metformin at a young age could gain long-term benefi Continue reading >>

Periods Are A Pain But Here's How To Live With Them

Periods Are A Pain But Here's How To Live With Them

According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, dysmenorrhoea (painful menstruation) affects one in five women. Cramping is caused by the muscles in the uterus contracting to dispel blood, but it can be a sign of a greater problem, such as endometriosis, fibroid issues or an infection. Studies have shown that magnesium can relax uterine muscles, so include leafy greens in your diet, as they are rich in the mineral. Researchers at the University of Maryland also found that increasing your calcium intake may help. It could be time to switch your usual towels or tampons, too. Theres been a renewed interest in the Mooncup the reusable silicone vessel designed to collect blood that first found popularity in the 80s to deal with period pain. Its reportedly more comfortable than a tampon as it sits lower down in the vagina. If you have a heavy flow, menstrual cups can hold up to 28g of fluid at a time, which is far more than the average tampon. Prone to thrush? Choose tampons made from unbleached cotton, so theyre less likely to cause irritation. And in some good news, some kind soul has invented a period pain chocolate bar , which is meant to help ease the pain of cramping. Figures from the NHS state that over 2 million women in the UK suffer from endometriosis. This is a condition where cells from the uterus migrate to other parts of the body, such as the ovaries, bowel or bladder, causing symptoms that include abdominal pain, heavy bleeding between periods and pain during sex. Another common condition is irregular periods due to an overproduction of male hormones or PCOS. If your period disappears or is erratic, or you notice excess facial hair, it could be PCOS. But both conditions are hard to diagnose, because the symptoms vary. However, they are among the leadin Continue reading >>

Metformin As A New Therapy For Endometriosis, Its Effects On Both Clinical Picture And Cytokines Profile - Sciencedirect

Metformin As A New Therapy For Endometriosis, Its Effects On Both Clinical Picture And Cytokines Profile - Sciencedirect

Volume 17, Issue 4 , December 2012, Pages 262-267 Metformin as a new therapy for endometriosis, its effects on both clinical picture and cytokines profile Author links open overlay panel Ashraf AhmedFodaa Open Access funded by Middle East Fertility Society Metformin has both anti-inflammatory properties and a modulatory effect on ovarian steroid production. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have yet examined the effects of metformin therapy on patients with endometriosis. To determine the effects of metformin therapy on the patients complaints and on the serum levels of some cytokines. Sixty-nine infertile patients were diagnosed by diagnostic laparoscopy to have stages 1 & 2 endometriosis. They were subdivided into a control group and a treated group. Analysis of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF levels using ELISA kits. The effects of metformin therapy on the serum IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF levels after 3 and 6months were compared with the control group (non-treated cases). Metformin therapy resulted in a significant reduction in the patients complaints (P<0.01) and in the serum levels of IL-6, IL-8 & VEGF. Metformin therapy in patients with endometriosis resulted in a significant reduction in the symptomatic cases, increased chance of pregnancy, and a decrease in the levels of serum cytokines, suggesting that it may have a therapeutic potential as an anti-endometriotic drug. Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

How Metformin Is Used for Polycystic Ovaries Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a common cause of anovulation and infertility in women. These women do not ovulate (release eggs) regularly and therefore have irregular menstrual periods. The ovaries have many small cysts (2-7 mm diameter) called antral follicles, giving the ovaries a characteristic "polycystic" (many cysts) appearance on ultrasound. A relatively new method of treating ovulation problems in women with polycystic ovarian disease is to use an oral medication called metformin (brand name is Glucophage). Metformin has traditionally been used as an oral drug to help control diabetes. Then, some smart doctor figured out that polycystic ovarian syndrome treatment with metformin can be very effective. If Glucophage alone does not result in ovulation and pregnancy, we often use: If the combination therapy is not effective, we can try: Metformin Use with IVF Treatment We also use Glucophage in women going through in vitro fertilization for PCOS, and for those with very high antral follicle counts - if their ovaries are "polycystic" by ultrasound. We find that some women with polycystic ovaries respond with a "smoother" response to the injectable FSH medication if they have been taking Glucophage. Risks and Side Effects of Metformin / Glucophage In about 25% of women Glucophage causes side effects which may include abdominal discomfort, cramping, diarrhea and nausea. The side effects may be severe enough to make the woman stop the Glucophage medication. We are not aware of any serious complications resulting from Glucophage treatment. Another oral medication used for diabetes called Troglitazone has been associated with liver failure and death in rare cases. This has been publicized on television shows, in newspapers, et Continue reading >>

Will You Have Menstrual Cramps With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Menstrual Cramps With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Drug comparison of Zonisamide, Concerta, Prazosin, Prozac for a 17 year old girl NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Why Does Taking Medication For Diabetes (metformin, Invokana) Cause Me To Have Very Long Periods Despite Birth Control? (cross-posted To Ask A Doctor) : Diabetes

Why Does Taking Medication For Diabetes (metformin, Invokana) Cause Me To Have Very Long Periods Despite Birth Control? (cross-posted To Ask A Doctor) : Diabetes

I'm having a really worrying medical problem that I hope you can help me with. I was diagnosed with type two diabetes about a year and a half ago. When was first diagnosed I took insulin and my menstrual cycle was normal-for me anyway, 8 to 9 days and very painful cramping. I was able to skip my period with pills or the Nuvaring, my preferred birth control. Some info about me: Caucasian, 34 years old, 30 pounds overweight but losing weight due to Invokana, experiencing prolonged menstruation for more than eight weeks, live in the US, have type 2 diabetes, had one ovary removed at age 19. Unfortunately my blood sugar was still out of control with insulin and it made me gain weight, so I tried Metformin (for about 9 months) which I quit due to severe nausea and exhaustion. I'm now taking Invokana and having good numbers with my blood sugar. The menstrual bleeding is my only side effect. My problem is, with both of these pills, I had/have extremely long, heavy periods. I would have periods of 9 to 14 days on Metformin while using a new Nuvaring every 21 days. I've currently been bleeding on and off for over two months(!)--basically, since I started the Invokana. I've seen my gynecologist twice about this as well as my GP and they both agree that my reproductive health is fine, it's just a reaction to the medications. The gynecologist gave me a prescription for the generic version of Seasonique, since I was bleeding so much on the Nuvaring with either Metformin or Invokana. Unfortunately, the bleeding still hasn't stopped after 4 weeks on the pill. This is a problem for more than the obvious reasons--the annoyance of a ridiculously long period and cramps. When I was 19, I developed two non-cancerous tumors on my left ovary and it had to be removed. I'm supposed to take bir Continue reading >>

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