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Does Metformin Expire

Death By Expired Insulin Prescription

Death By Expired Insulin Prescription

A family’s grief leads to a bill that would allow pharmacists to dispense insulin without a current prescription to save lives. It’s been 16 months since Dan and Judy Houdeshell lost their son, Kevin, and they are trying to accept that they may never know exactly what happened. Kevin, who was on insulin therapy, was found dead in his home in Sheffield Lake, Ohio on January 8th, 2014. He had been without insulin for nine days at the time of his death. Dan and his family have tried to reconstruct those last days the best they can, talking with Kevin’s co-workers and examining text messages Kevin sent. “The last four days, he was by himself,” Dan says. “I can only imagine…no, I can’t even imagine what it was like.” sponsor There were many steps that led to Kevin’s death. The path may have included some less-than-perfect choices in his self-care, and bad luck; there is still so much that isn’t known. Dan is certain, however, of the first action that set off the chain of events that led to Kevin’s death: he was denied insulin at a local pharmacy on New Year’s Eve. Since then, Dan and his family have been calling for a change to Ohio state law to expand the prescribing authority of state pharmacists so people on insulin therapy, and those who need other life-saving medications, need not walk away empty-handed. The Ohio legislature is taking up a bill that would incorporate these changes into law. Dan hopes Kevin’s death might lead to a change that can help others. “It doesn’t really help us with the grieving process, it’s just something we have to do,” he says. “We don’t want this to happen to anyone ever again.” The DKA spiral Here’s what happened: On December 31st, 2013, Kevin was out of insulin and tried to get some at the pharma Continue reading >>

The Dangerous Truth About The Expired Medicine In Your Cabinet

The Dangerous Truth About The Expired Medicine In Your Cabinet

The question: Is it ever safe to use expired medications? The answer: We’ve all come across that bottle in the farthest corner of the medicine cabinet. You haven’t needed it for a while, but then you do, for whatever reason, and you realize it’s expired. But does medicine actually go bad? And what’s the risk? It’s twofold, explains Jeff McClusky, pharmacy supervisor at a speciality clinic in the Harris Health System in Texas and an American Pharmacists Association (APhA) spokesperson. Expiration dates, he tells The Huffington Post, guard against potential spoilage of medication ingredients as well as potential losses in potency. An expired medication may not have an adverse effect, but it’s a big risk. A dip in potency of your over-the-counter pain reliever wouldn’t typically be a big deal, but consider a more serious ailment: Heart or diabetes medication, for example, is critical to managing disease. A dose at lower potency could cause “a negative effect almost immediately,” he says. Compensating for the lowered potency brings about risks of its own, says Jennifer Adams, PharmD, EdD, a spokesperson for the APhA and the senior director of strategic academic partnerships at the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. If an expired medication is now only 90 percent effective, some patients might just assume it’s safe to take two pills instead of one, or three instead of two, she says. “You aren’t really sure in terms of how much you’re going to be getting, and you could potentially be getting too much ... That’s when it can be very dangerous.” The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that an active ingredient in a medication must be present in 90 to 110 percent of the amount indicated on a drug’s label. Tablets and capsule Continue reading >>

Medication Past Its Expiry Date Could Still Work

Medication Past Its Expiry Date Could Still Work

04/10/2015 05:00 EDT | Updated 06/09/2015 05:59 EDT Medication Past Its Expiry Date Could Still Work TORONTO - The recall earlier this week of a batch of Alesse birth control pills sold past their expiry date has raised questions about whether it's safe to take over-the-counter and prescription medications beyond their best-before marker and just how long past? "I think it would alarm a lot of Canadians if they knew that there isn't a lot of study on this," said Phil Emberley, director of pharmacy innovation at the Canadian Pharmacists Association. Drug manufacturers must provide evidence on the potency and safety of products related to exposure to light, heat and humidity in order to get market approval from Health Canada, using what are known as stability studies. "The purpose of the stability study is to establish, based on testing a minimum of three batches of the drug product, a shelf life and label storage instructions applicable to all future batches of the drug product manufactured and packaged under similar circumstances," Health Canada says. These tests include studies in which pilot batches of medications are stored at a temperature of about 25 C, with about 60 per cent relative humidity, for a minimum of 12 months, the federal department says on its website. The expiration date is the final date that a manufacturer will guarantee 100 per cent potency and safety of a medication, based on stability testing under Health Canada's good manufacturing practices, or GMP. But that best-before date is based on an unopened container. Once a dispensing pharmacist or patient has opened a bottle or package, exposing the contents to the elements, manufacturers no longer consider original expiry dates in force, Emberley said. "So if you have a bottle that, say, expires in Continue reading >>

Medicine Information - Kaiser Permanente

Medicine Information - Kaiser Permanente

Brand name(s): Fortamet, Glucophage XR, Glumetza Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.Metformin may be used with lifest Continue reading >>

Drug Expiration - Ask A Pharmacist - Medhelp

Drug Expiration - Ask A Pharmacist - Medhelp

I like to ask my pharmacy to put expiration dates on my prescription medication bottles.I have done this for years for my own protection after my uncle was given a bottle of morphine (he had lung cancer) that was expired. I renewed my presciption for Metformin (500 mg, twice a day) which I take for PCOS and to prevent diabetes as I had gestational diabetes.I do not have diabetes now.When I renewed my prescription a new pharmacist was there.I asked him to put the expiration date on my prescription bottle.He gave me the date of December 2012 but then said that that date was only valid until the manufacturers bottle was opened.He said that keep in mind that since he opened the bottle the medication was only good for three to six months.That does not seem realistic to me since I used to take a small dose of dexamethosone which I used to get a years prescription all at once.If what he said was correct then my medication would have been expired for at least half the time I took it.In all the years I have asked for expiration dates on my prescription bottles, no pharmacist except this one has ever mentioned that the medication will expire three to six months after he gave it to me regardless of the manufacturers expiration date on the bottle. I've read that drug companies put expiration dates on drugs as guidelines and that drugs usually last years after the expiration date with the exception of a few like tetracycline.I am not looking to keep my drugs after my expiration date, I just want to know what information is correct as far as manufacturers expiration dates. Continue reading >>

Apo-metformin

Apo-metformin

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Metformin 500, 850 or 1000 tablets. It contains the active ingredient metformin (as metformin hydrochloride). It is used to treat type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or maturity onset diabetes) in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. Your doctor may have prescribed this medicine for another reason. This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription. How it works Metformin lowers high blood glucose by helping your body make better Continue reading >>

Metformin Smelling Fishy? What You Can Do.

Metformin Smelling Fishy? What You Can Do.

Researchers have discovered what many people with diabetes have known for years: The popular Type 2 diabetes drug metformin (brand names Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet, and others) has a distinctive scent that, for some people, is enough to cause them to stop taking it. But as the most widely prescribed diabetes drug in the United States, metformin plays an important role in helping people with Type 2 diabetes control their blood glucose levels, and experts have suggested several solutions for dealing with the medicine’s unique scent. In a letter published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, physicians from the Medical College of Georgia described two adult men with Type 2 diabetes who complained of a “dead fish” odor of metformin that had led both men to stop taking the medicine. Searching the medical literature for more information, author J. Russell May, PharmD, and colleagues found no reports of this issue. Upon searching the Internet, however, the researchers came across hundreds of message board posts referencing metformin’s odor, and an informal survey of pharmacists found that many could identify the medicine by its distinct smell. May and his colleagues wrote to the journal to raise awareness of this issue and questioned whether nausea, one of the most commonly reported side effects of metformin, could in some cases in fact be a reaction the fishy odor. May noted that “Metformin is an excellent drug, but the immediate-release formulation may have an odor to it. The smell is fishy or like the inside of an inner tube, and in a patient’s mind…they may think the drug isn’t good.” (A manufacturer of metformin notes that there has been no association between the odor of metformin and its effectiveness.) The authors indicated that switching t Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Medication Once It Has Expired?

Is It Safe To Take Medication Once It Has Expired?

Is it safe to take medication once it has expired? Facebook 0 Twitter 0 livefyre Email Print Many of us are guilty of keeping leftover painkillers from a surgery or old injury in the medicine cabinet instead of throwing them out, but is it safe to reach for them months or years later when a headache becomes too much to bear? We recently got this question from a viewer: What really happens to medications on after their expiration date? Is it unsafe to still take them? The expiration date on a medication is the date when the manufacturer will guarantee the full potency and safety of the drug. However, a study requested by the military and conducted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), found that 90 percent of more than 100 drugs tested were safe to use up to 15 years after they had expired. The study included both over-the-counter and prescription drugs. While the study seems to question the value of weight placed on expiration dates, it is important to remember what it signifies. While technically the medicines may still be potent, the effectiveness may not be the same. Additionally, taking expired medications can have fatal consequences. Certain medications like nitroglycerin, insulin and liquid antibiotics are not as long-lasting as the ones that were tested in the study. A rule of thumb to live by is if youre unsure about the safety of a medication and the expiration date has passed, throw it out or consult your local pharmacist before taking it. If you have health questions just email Dr. Manny: Continue reading >>

Taking Expired Medications Can Have Serious Consequences

Taking Expired Medications Can Have Serious Consequences

What do you do when you have a splitting headache? You usually go to the medicine cabinet and start looking for the aspirin or acetaminophen, right? What happens if you take the time to look at the side or the bottom of the bottle, and see that the product expired two years ago? Do you take it or not? Would taking it be a damaging or fatal mistake, or can you expect relief from the headache? This is a dilemma that most of us who take the time to read the label face at one time or another. Well, here is some information that will hopefully help you make an informed decision. In 1979, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began requiring an expiration date on prescription and over-the-counter medications to serve as a very conservative guide to their longevity. The law requires manufacturers to stamp the expiration date on each product. The expiration date is a guarantee from the manufacturer that a medication will remain chemically stable — and thus, fully potent and safe — prior to that date. However, this calculation is based on the stability of the product in its original unopened container. Once a container is opened and the contents are exposed to air and moisture, that date is no longer valid. It’s important to realize that the expiration date does stand for something, but most likely not what you thought it did. You can easily smell or see when a gallon of milk and loaf of bread are no longer consumable. The expiration dates on them help. Tablets or capsules in most cases don’t mold or start smelling bad. However, there are some exceptions. When aspirin is stored in the bathroom medicine cabinet, the prolonged exposure to moisture in the air makes the active ingredient in aspirin convert to acetic acid, which is why old aspirin smells like vinegar. A Continue reading >>

That Drug Expiration Date May Be More Myth Than Fact

That Drug Expiration Date May Be More Myth Than Fact

The box of prescription drugs had been forgotten in a back closet of a retail pharmacy for so long that some of the pills predated the 1969 moon landing. Most were 30 to 40 years past their expiration dates — possibly toxic, probably worthless. But to Lee Cantrell, who helps run the California Poison Control System, the cache was an opportunity to answer an enduring question about the actual shelf life of drugs: Could these drugs from the bell-bottom era still be potent? Cantrell called Roy Gerona, a University of California, San Francisco researcher who specializes in analyzing chemicals. Gerona grew up in the Philippines and had seen people recover from sickness by taking expired drugs with no apparent ill effects. "This was very cool," Gerona says. "Who gets the chance of analyzing drugs that have been in storage for more than 30 years?" The age of the drugs might have been bizarre, but the question the researchers wanted to answer wasn't. Pharmacies across the country in major medical centers and in neighborhood strip malls routinely toss out tons of scarce and potentially valuable prescription drugs when they hit their expiration dates. Gerona, a pharmacist; and Cantrell, a toxicologist, knew that the term "expiration date" was a misnomer. The dates on drug labels are simply the point up to which the Food and Drug Administration and pharmaceutical companies guarantee their effectiveness, typically at two or three years. But the dates don't necessarily mean they're ineffective immediately after they "expire" — just that there's no incentive for drugmakers to study whether they could still be usable. ProPublica has been researching why the U.S. health care system is the most expensive in the world. One answer, broadly, is waste — some of it buried in practices Continue reading >>

Prescription Drugs: Still Potent Years After Expiration Date

Prescription Drugs: Still Potent Years After Expiration Date

Prescription Drugs: Still Potent Years After Expiration Date Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Every year millions of people are tossing out drugs that have reached or passed their expiration dates ; many could be doing so because they believe such drugs are not as potent as they once were. However, a new analysis of eight prescription drugs that have well-surpassed their discard date, some by as much as 40 years, has found that these drugs are just as potent as the day they were manufactured. Just as most consumers are curious as to whether these outdated drugs are safe, so were researchers from the California Poison Control System , UC San Francisco and UC Irvine . Armed with an array of eight drugs between 28 and 40 years past their prime, the researchers tested their effectiveness levels to see if they had in fact gone bad. The drugs tested came from pharmacy shelves, many sitting around collecting dust for decades, and had remained sealed in their original containers. The researchers focused their studies on 15 active ingredients found in the drugs, including acetaminophen , codeine , caffeine , hydrocodone , aspirin , amphetamine and others . The researchers couldnt find a standard test for one ingredient, homatropine , so they dropped that one from their analysis. To test their potency levels, the researchers dissolved the drugs and subjected them to chemical analysis using a mass spectrometer, which revealed how much of the active ingredients remained in the pills. Out of the 14 tested ingredients, 12 were still at high enough concentrations (90 percent) to qualify as having acceptable potency. The only two active ingredients that lost any significant amount of potency were aspirin and amphetamine. In the remaining 12, the potency levels Continue reading >>

Drug Expiration Dates — Do They Mean Anything?

Drug Expiration Dates — Do They Mean Anything?

FDA study gets to the heart of medicine expiration and safety With a splitting headache, you reach into your medicine cabinet for some aspirin only to find the stamped expiration date on the medicine bottle is more than a year out of date. So, does medicine expire? Do you take it or don't you? If you decide to take the aspirin, will it be a fatal mistake or will you simply continue to suffer from the headache? This is a dilemma many people face in some way or another. A column published in Psychopharmacology Today offers some advice. It turns out that the expiration date on a drug does stand for something, but probably not what you think it does. Since a law was passed in 1979, drug manufacturers are required to stamp an expiration date on their products. This is the date at which the manufacturer can still guarantee the full potency and safety of the drug. Most of what is known about drug expiration dates comes from a study conducted by the Food and Drug Administration at the request of the military. With a large and expensive stockpile of drugs, the military faced tossing out and replacing its drugs every few years. What they found from the study is 90% of more than 100 drugs, both prescription and over-the-counter, were perfectly good to use even 15 years after the expiration date. So the expiration date doesn't really indicate a point at which the medication is no longer effective or has become unsafe to use. Medical authorities state if expired medicine is safe to take, even those that expired years ago. A rare exception to this may be tetracycline, but the report on this is controversial among researchers. It's true the effectiveness of a drug may decrease over time, but much of the original potency still remains even a decade after the expiration date. Excluding Continue reading >>

Expired Metformin - Other Medications - Diabetes Forums

Expired Metformin - Other Medications - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. My sister-in-law gave me a bottle of Metformin which she stopped taking because it was causing her problems. The expiration date was last May. Does Metformin, have a short shelf life or do you think it will still be effective? Met generally has quite a long shelf life - the box I have that I got a month ago has an expiry date some time in 2014 ... However as long as they have been kept dry and avoided major heat shocks, they should be fine Hello, have you ever heard that meds don't actually experied until 30 years later? I read it and it actually makes sense. To answer your question it doesn't matter. Met is generally formulated as a solid/hard tablet. This type of medication has the longest shelf life. If it has been stored in an air-tight container, in low humidity and has not suffered any major heat shocks, it should still be fine. If it is in any way damp - throw it out right away; even if it is still "in-date" Hello, did you know that medications do not expired? Hello, this a research that says that meds have 15 years until they expired. I don't think any one would drink something 15 years later but you can drink it if its 2 months old. I'd like to ask the people that have no idea what they're talking about to think it over before you post. You know who you are. My sister-in-law gave me a bottle of Metformin which she stopped taking because it was causing her problems. The expiration date was last May. Does Metformin, have a short shelf life or do you think it will still be effective? If I were you, I would talk to a Pharmacist to be sure that what you are taking is SAFE for you to be ta Continue reading >>

How Long Is Metformin Good For After Expiration Date

How Long Is Metformin Good For After Expiration Date

How Long Is Metformin Good For After Expiration Date How Long Is Metformin Good For After Expiration Date How Long Is Metformin Good For After Expiration Date Is Metformin toxic if taken after expiration date? - drugs.com It is not recommended to take any med after the expiry date, it would lose Is Metformin toxic if taken after expiration date? are pills still good? Expired Metformin - Other Medications - Diabetes forums Expired Metformin - posted in Other The expiration date was last May. Does Metformin, How long something lasts beyond its expiration date is strictly What are the effect of taking metformin after expire date by Posted in: diabetes, type 2, metformin What are the effect of taking metformin after expire date by more than one Our labels now have expiration dates. Is it safe to take medication past its expiration date Specifically looking at Metformin Is it safe to take medication past its expiration date? How long after the exp date are we talking? How long is metformin expiration date - m5r2p.shellkare.com Bombs from low altitude good. how long is metformin expiration date cant say Id as no surprise that then made to watch implemented as. What is shelf life of metformin after expiration date to prove how long a particular . The normal shelf-life of pills are good television show, a nor what is shelf life of metformin after expiration date it Metformin Generic Health Consumer Medicine Information Consumer Medicine Information Metformin Do not take Metformin Generic Health tablets after the expiry date How long to take it. Continue taking Metformin Drug Expiration - Ask a Pharmacist - MedHelp Drug Expiration I am not looking to keep my drugs after my expiration date, Some medications have expiration dates that only apply as long as they Are Expired Drugs Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Lose Strength If Taken After Expired Or Toxic?

Does Metformin Lose Strength If Taken After Expired Or Toxic?

Home Q & A Questions Does Metformin lose strength... Does Metformin lose strength if taken after expired or toxic? Yes , you are right, they lose their strength and can become toxic so please do not take any and dispose of them safely.- Still looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question . The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records. Available for Android and iOS devices. Subscribe to receive email notifications whenever new articles are published. Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include Micromedex (updated Apr 12th, 2018), Cerner Multum (updated Apr 5th, 2018), Wolters Kluwer (updated Apr 6th, 2018) and others. To view content sources and attributions, please refer to our editorial policy . Continue reading >>

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