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Does Metformin Decrease Effectiveness Of Birth Control

Metformin And Birth Control Pill Simultaneously

Metformin And Birth Control Pill Simultaneously

Metformin and Birth Control Pill Simultaneously If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Metformin and Birth Control Pill Simultaneously I was wondering whether anyone has had experience with taking a birth control pill (in my case Alesse) in conjunction with Metformin. In the past when taken alone, Metformin helped me lose weight but did not fully regulate my cycle. This time, following the birth of my first child, I began with a birth control pill to regulate my periods and then recently began the Metformin to help with weight loss. Right after my daughter was born, I immediately lost 30 pounds of my pregnancy weight. Since then, despite Weight Watchers, followed by lowering my carb consumption and upping my activity, I cannot lose a pound. I was hoping the Allese would help with weight loss, but it had no effect. I have now been on 1500mg of Metformin for 10 days and have had no real weight loss either. I am wondering if perhaps the birth control pill is countering the weight loss effect of the Metformin. Does anyone have any thoughts about that possibility or any suggestions how to get the weight loss going? I'm having the same issues. My doctor put me on met (starting out 1,000mg) and nuva ring BC and I'm not losing any weight at all. It's been four weeks. I just started met today again been on and off of met. but i have been taking nore somthing bcps. I hate these bcps I have acne and more facial hair and been eating more. I really hate it My beautiful baby boy Neo Tristan was born March 4th, 2011 @ 3:48 am Hidden Content Never consider the pos Continue reading >>

Ocs Plus Metformin For The Treatment Of Pcos

Ocs Plus Metformin For The Treatment Of Pcos

Oral Contraceptives Plus Metformin for the Treatment of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Would the combination of levonorgestrel ethinyl estradiol plus metformin be effective for the treatment of patients with the polycystic ovary syndrome? Response from Robert L. Barbieri, MD The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is defined as the presence of both ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenism. In women with PCOS, oligo- or anovulation manifests itself as irregular cycles with oligo- or amenorrhea. Hyperandrogenism can be identified by physical examination, ie, the presence of hirsutism or by laboratory tests that demonstrate an elevated circulating concentration of a major androgen, ie, free testosterone, total testosterone, and/or androstenedione. A third criterion for the diagnosis of PCOS is to exclude other causes of hyperandrogenism, such as nonclassic adrenal hyperplasia resulting from a 21-hydroxylase defect or an androgen-producing adrenal or ovarian tumor. PCOS occurs in approximately 5% to 7% of women of reproductive age.[ 1 , 2 ] This makes PCOS the most common endocrinopathy of women. Women with PCOS have both abnormally elevated luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion[ 3 , 4 ] and hyperinsulinemia as a result of insulin resistance.[ 5 ] The combination of hypersecretion of LH and insulin causes ovarian androgen overproduction.[ 6 ] In turn, ovarian androgen overproduction causes hirsutism and prevents normal ovarian follicle growth, preventing regular ovulation. PCOS can be treated by lowering LH hypersecretion (oral contraceptive pills or GnRH agonist analogues) or by reversing the hyperinsulinemia that is caused by insulin resistance (weight loss or metformin). An intriguing idea is to use oral contraceptives plus metformin in combination to simultaneously attack t Continue reading >>

Metformin Versus Oral Contraceptive Pill In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Cochrane Review

Metformin Versus Oral Contraceptive Pill In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Cochrane Review

Metformin versus oral contraceptive pill in polycystic ovary syndrome: a Cochrane review Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Women's and Children's Health University of New South Wales, Royal Hospital for Women To whom correspondence should be addressed at: Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Women's and Children's Health, Level 1 Women's Health Institute, Royal Hospital for Women Locked Bag 2000, Randwick, Sydney, NSW 2031 Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Women's and Children's Health University of New South Wales, Royal Hospital for Women Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Women's and Children's Health University of New South Wales, Royal Hospital for Women National Women's Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Human Reproduction, Volume 22, Issue 5, 1 May 2007, Pages 12001209, Michael F. Costello, Bhushan Shrestha, John Eden, Neil P. Johnson, Peter Sjoblom; Metformin versus oral contraceptive pill in polycystic ovary syndrome: a Cochrane review, Human Reproduction, Volume 22, Issue 5, 1 May 2007, Pages 12001209, The object of this review was to compare metformin versus oral contraceptive pill (OCP) treatment in polycystic ovary syndrome. A systematic review and meta-analysis employing the principles of the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group was undertaken. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (104 subjects) were included. Limited data demonstrated no evidence of a difference in effect between metformin and the OCP on hirsutism, acne or development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. There were no trials assessing diagnosis of cardiovascular disease or endometrial cancer. Metformin, in comparison with the OCP, was less effective in improving menstrual pattern [Peto odds ratio (OR) 0.08, 95% Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Oral Contraceptives And Metabolic Issues: New Perspectives And A Unifying Hypothesis

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Oral Contraceptives And Metabolic Issues: New Perspectives And A Unifying Hypothesis

Polycystic ovary syndrome, oral contraceptives and metabolic issues: new perspectives and a unifying hypothesis Departments of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology) and Obstetrics/Gynecology/Reproductive Sciences, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX, USA and To whom correspondence should be addressed at: 6431 Fannin Street, Suite 3604, Houston, TX 77030, USA. E-mail: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: 1st Department of Medicine, Endocrine Section, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Departments of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology) and Obstetrics/Gynecology/Reproductive Sciences, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX, USA and 1st Department of Medicine, Endocrine Section, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Search for other works by this author on: Human Reproduction, Volume 22, Issue 2, 1 February 2007, Pages 317322, S. Nader, E. Diamanti-Kandarakis; Polycystic ovary syndrome, oral contraceptives and metabolic issues: new perspectives and a unifying hypothesis, Human Reproduction, Volume 22, Issue 2, 1 February 2007, Pages 317322, In the chronic treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) are commonly used to induce regular menses, protect the endometrium and ameliorate androgenic symptoms. However, the long-term safety of OCP use in PCOS has not been established, and the literature reveals conflicting data concerning the metabolic effects of OCPs in this patient population, with outcomes ranging from improvement of glucose tolerance to the development of frank diabetes. This article presents new perspectives and a unifying hypothesis concerning the effects of OCPs on carbohydrate metabolism in PCOS and attempts to explain the divergent findings in published reports. carboh Continue reading >>

5 Reasons The Pill May Not Be The Answer To Pcos

5 Reasons The Pill May Not Be The Answer To Pcos

I am currently on nuvaring which i was told was mild on the hormones and although i yo-yo because ive given up on my diet and exercise routines in the past, Ive been able to lose weight before and right now on my current weight loss blogging adventure. id like to go off birth control when its possible too but im worried because the last time i went off for a month, my weight sprung up about 5-8 pounds. I guess I would have to ask a doctor but would you have any idea at what weight (BMI, whatever) it would be safe to go off nvaring i mean, is there a point in weight loss when the cycle become at least somwhat normal? I vaguely remember a somewhat regular cycle when i was more active in high school about about 150-160 pounds (now im 183 and Ive been all the way up to about 210 in my adult life). Anyways, great to find another blogging PCOSer! Is it all right if I link and follow you? My blog is Thanks for your comment. As I state in my post I am not a medical professional. I can only say that I am now at a 21 BMI and I still need help with my cycles from time to time and I now use natural progesterone cream. I will post about it soon. I will tell you that I did experience hair loss after stopping the pill. Dont be alarmed, it is just like post-partum and does come back. If you are taking spironolactone or even saw palmetto it may not be as much loss. The absolute best thing you can do for your PCOS is exercise and eat clean. Check out my posts about both. Thanks for linking to me. Keep up the good work with your weight loss! I tried Yaz for about a year or two and it did regulate hormones/cycles. I was also on spironolactone which lowered my testosterone even more. I noticed the same type of symptoms on the pill as PCOSDiva. Libido was down, I was really dehydrated and s Continue reading >>

Does Glucophage (metformin) Decrease The Effectiveness Of Oral Contraception?

Does Glucophage (metformin) Decrease The Effectiveness Of Oral Contraception?

Does Glucophage (metformin) decrease the effectiveness of oral contraception? I was recently prescribed metformin for insulin resistance, and my research has shown me that some women actually take this to increase their chances of... show more I was recently prescribed metformin for insulin resistance, and my research has shown me that some women actually take this to increase their chances of conceiving. I currently take birth control pills, and I'm worried that their effectiveness could be decreased by the Glucophage. I may need to switch to an IUD to maintain a baby-free tummy. Does anyone know for sure whether or not metformin can make birth control less effective? The endocrinologist that my sister sees says that it does increase your chance of conception, but the contraceptive pills should not be decreased by the glucophage/metformin. If you're still uneasy, ask your doctor though. He or she will be able to help you much more than we answerers on here can :) The Metformin can in simple terms do plenty. while you're persevering with to crush your physique with carbs and sugar, then it fairly is in simple... show more The Metformin can in simple terms do plenty. while you're persevering with to crush your physique with carbs and sugar, then it fairly is in simple terms a count number of time before you finally end up on insulin. I take one 500 mg Metformin interior the morning and one interior the nighttime before nutrition. i haven't gotten nausea from it. at times, i'm going to get diarrhea, even inspite of the shown fact that it fairly is fairly uncommon. while you're taking greater beneficial than i'm, you probably choose a meals plan overhaul. i understand you do not have countless selection being interior the defense force (Which one? i presumed diabetics cou Continue reading >>

Best Birth Control Pills For Pcos

Best Birth Control Pills For Pcos

A widely used treatment for PCOS is combination birth control . The symptoms of PCOS vary from woman-to-woman. Birth control pills help regulate a woman's menstrual period, making it more predictable. Hormonal birth control pills are safe but they may present some risks. mood changes, problems concentrating, and fatigue irregular periods due to delayed or no ovulation Symptoms vary and may be mild or so severe that they disrupt a woman's life. With treatment, the symptoms can be managed and may disappear. Hormonal birth control is considered to be combination birth control when it contains two hormones. These hormones are usually estrogen, and a synthetic form of progesterone called progestin. These combination pills can also regulate some hormonal imbalances, by increasing a woman's estrogen levels and decreasing the amount of testosterone her body produces. Due to combination birth control pills containing two hormones that can adjust hormone issues, they are the preferred choice for many prescribing doctors. However, not all women can safely take combination pills. Hormonal birth control pills are safe, but they do present some risks including : A greater risk of diabetes: This is a consideration for women with PCOS who are already at risk for diabetes. A risk of cardiovascular issues: Including dangerous blood clots in the legs. Women with PCOS who are obese may have an elevated risk. If they smoke, the risk rises. Weight gain: Some evidence suggests that birth control pills can cause weight gain, but other studies disagree. Women who are already obese may be reluctant to take birth control pills. Weight gain can make the symptoms of PCOS worse. For some women, a pill known as the minipill may be a better choice. Minipills contain just one hormone, progestin. They Continue reading >>

Best Birth Control For Pcos: 3 Options

Best Birth Control For Pcos: 3 Options

The vaginal ring costs as much as the skin patch, or $30 to $35 for a months supply. The ring is also covered by most insurance plans. Will any form of hormonal birth control work? Combination birth control whether in the form of a pill, ring, or patch is the most popular and recommended form of treatment for PCOS. If youre unable to take the combination pill or use other combination methods, your doctor may recommend the progestin-only pill. There are also other alternatives, including: Progesterone therapy: You can take progesterone for 10 to 14 days every one to two months. This treatment doesnt prevent pregnancy or improve androgen levels, but it can help manage your symptoms. Progestin-containing intrauterine device (IUD): IUDs that contain progestin can help ease the symptoms of PCOS in the same way combination or progestin-only pills do. Metformin: This medication for type 2 diabetes, brand name Glucophage , lowers insulin and androgen levels and improves insulin resistance. Insulin resistance commonly occurs with PCOS, and metformin might be used to treat this. It isnt approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat PCOS specifically, so this is considered off-label use. But research has shown that it may help restart ovulation and lead to regular periods. Off-label drug use means that a drug thats been approved by the FDA for one purpose is used for a different purpose that has not been approved. However, a doctor can still use the drug for that purpose. This is because the FDA regulates the testing and approval of drugs, but not how doctors use drugs to treat their patients. So, your doctor can prescribe a drug however they think is best for your care. Using birth control to protect against pregnancy Although PCOS is the leading cause of infertilit Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Counter The Helpfulness Of Birth Control? Does It Make Periods Heavy?

Does Metformin Counter The Helpfulness Of Birth Control? Does It Make Periods Heavy?

Home Q & A Questions Does Metformin counter the... Does Metformin counter the helpfulness of birth control? Does it make periods heavy? birth control , insulin resistance , polycystic ovary syndrome , metformin , period I have PCOS and I have been on birth control for about 2 years now to help control it and because I am sexually active. I started Metformin about 4 months ago since I was becoming insulin resistant. Recently every period I have been getting has been long and heavy, since I started taking metformin. Is this normal? Is the Metformin making the birth control not work? The periods are still during the placebo week, but I am worried about the effectiveness of the birth control since I am sexually active (and I am not trying to have a baby). Any help/advice would be appreciated, thanks! I don't know that this is the answer, but I have a guess. Young women with insulin resistance are likely to also have a co-morbid condition called PCOS (poly-cystic ovarian syndrome). High insulin levels (that you WOULD have had), and PCOS, would cause your ovaries to push out more androgen hormones, such as testosterone. The result of this would be acne, more body hair than usual, and fewer or irregular periods. What may be happening to your body is that the Metformin is regulating the amount of glucose in your blood, reversing the insulin resistance (i.e. making your body more sensitive to the insulin that your pancreas IS pushing out), and lowering your risk for diabetes. Your reproductive system may be starting to function more normally. I know many Many MANY women who have PCOS and have taken Metformin to initiate regular menstrual cycles, to be able to finally conceive. This is clearly not your intention, but your symptoms indicate that the Metforming is working exactly Continue reading >>

Pcos: All Guides

Pcos: All Guides

PCOS is a common problem among teen girls and young women. In fact, almost 1 out of 10 women has PCOS. What is PCOS? Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormone imbalance that can cause irregular periods, unwanted hair growth, and acne. PCOS begins during a girl’s teen years and can be mild or severe. What are the signs of PCOS? Some of the most common signs of PCOS include: Irregular periods that come every few months, not at all, or too frequently Extra hair on your face or other parts of your body, called hirsutism (her-suit-is-em) Acne Weight gain and/or trouble losing weight Patches of dark skin on the back of your neck and other areas, called acanthosis nigricans (a-can-tho-sis ni-gri-cans) Could I have PCOS? If you have some or all of the above signs, you might have PCOS. There can be other reasons why you might have signs; however, only your health care provider can tell for sure. What causes PCOS? PCOS is caused by an imbalance in the hormones (chemical messengers) in your brain and your ovaries. PCOS usually happens when a hormone called LH (from the pituitary gland) or levels of insulin (from the pancreas) are too high, which then causes the ovaries to make extra amounts of testosterone. For a more detailed explanation, take a look at the female reproductive anatomy image: The pituitary (pi-tu-i-tary) gland in your brain makes the hormones luteinizing (lu-tin-iz-ing) hormone (LH) and follicle (fall-i-call) stimulating hormone (FSH). After getting the signal from the hormones LH and FSH, the ovaries make estrogen (es-tro-gen) and progesterone (pro-ges-ter-own), the female sex hormones. All normal ovaries also make a little bit of the androgen testosterone (an-dro-gen tes-tos-ter-own), a male sex hormone. The pancreas (pang-cree-us) is an organ that makes i Continue reading >>

Why Is Pcos Commonly Treated With Birth Control Pills?

Why Is Pcos Commonly Treated With Birth Control Pills?

PCOS and Birth Control Pills -- A Good Idea? If your doctor tells you that you have PCOS, they will probably also suggest putting you on the pill. But before you make that decision, its important to know more about how the pill works, the risks and problems with taking it, and alternatives you can consider. Prior to menopause, most women naturally produce estrogen and progesterone in a rhythmic fashion in order to regulate ovulation and menstruation. In women with PCOS, this natural hormonal rhythm is disturbed. The Pill causes a monthly bleed in most women, which seems like a "normal" period. Although the shedding of the lining of the uterus is an important health benefit of birth control pills, women are not actually ovulating while taking them. Therefore they are not experiencing all of the complex hormonal interactions that occur with a natural cycle. Continuation of this unnatural activity on a long-term basis could have unintended consequences. In a nutshell, birth control pills (oral contraceptives) release hormones into your body to create a highly regular menstrual cycle without ovulation. They contain various combinations and strengths of the hormones estrogen and progestin. Since irregular periods are the most common symptom of PCOS, taking birth control is a way to force your body into a regular cycle. There are both advantages and disadvantages to this approach. You may have heard that excessive levels of testosterone stimulates acne and facial/body hair growth, and impairs fertility. But did you know that there are two types of testosterone hormone? One is inactive. The other is biologically active. It is the "active" hormone that causes your symptoms. Fortunately, there is a substance circulating in your body called "sex hormone binding globulin" or SHBG Continue reading >>

The Well-rounded Mama

The Well-rounded Mama

PCOS and Birth Control Pills, Part 1: Information about Oral Contraceptives In previous posts, we have talked about PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome). We discussed its definition and symptoms , how it presents , its testing and diagnosis , and its possible causes . Then we began discussing common treatment protocols for PCOS, and the pros and cons of each. We are discussing treatment options from asize-friendlypoint of view (meaningno diet talk, no weight loss promotion). We've already discussed insulin-sensitizing medications like metformin ,the TZDs , and inositol . Then we discussed glucose-lowering medications for those who have developed overt diabetes. Now we are discussing treatments for PCOS, especially those for regulating the menstrual cycle. We talked about progesterone treatments for bringing on a long-overdue period; now we talk about using birth control pills to regulate the menstrual cycle, reduce androgen levels, and control unpleasant PCOS symptoms like hirsutism, acne, and alopecia. Disclaimer: I am not a medical health-care professional. While the following information is based on my best understanding of the research, always do your own research. This information is nota complete explanation of all the risks and benefits of a particular medication, nor is it medical advice about a health condition or treatment. Consult your healthcare provider before making any decisions about your care plan. Trigger Warning:Passing mention of the possible weight effects of several medications and of weight loss as a treatment for menstrual irregularity. Many women with PCOS experience irregular periods, often because of progesterone-deficiency. They don't produce enough progesterone to bring on a period and flush out the uterine lining. They tend to be estrogen-do Continue reading >>

Will My Birth Control Pill Still Be Effective If I Take Metformin To Lose Weight?

Will My Birth Control Pill Still Be Effective If I Take Metformin To Lose Weight?

Please visit the new WebMD Message Boards to find answers and get support. Will my birth control pill still be effective if I take metformin to lose weight? My OBGYN wanted me to look into birth control pills and consider my options. I DO NOT want a birth control pill that will make me gain weight or make it difficult for me to lose weight, which is why she also suggested adding Metformin to a birth control plan. I'm curious if the Metformin is actually effective in assisting in weight loss, and if it would in some way cancel out the effectiveness of any birth control I take. I want to keep losing weight but do not want to get pregnant either. Hi Found this on this siteits about all I can find doing research on it. Theres more on site just copy into google to the www. To open and read. Our data show that a combination of metformin and contraceptive pill may be more effective in suppressing the hyperandrogenemia of obese and non-obese PCOS patients than metformin alone and may reduce insulin levels more than contraceptive pill alone. Hence, combined treatment may become a more effective therapeutic option for PCOS. So what its saying isit would not harm the BC pills, Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, blogs, or WebMD Answers are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by th Continue reading >>

Will My Metformin Counteract With My Birth Control At All? - 3 Fat Chicks On A Diet Weight Loss Community

Will My Metformin Counteract With My Birth Control At All? - 3 Fat Chicks On A Diet Weight Loss Community

will my metformin counteract with my birth control at all? PCOS/Insulin Resistance Support Support for us with any of the following: Insulin Resistance, Syndrome X, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or other endocrine disorders. will my metformin counteract with my birth control at all? i was prescribed Loestrin24FE and metformin to help primarily with weight loss and with regulating my period. i wasn't sexually at the time when it was prescribed to me, so i wasn't too worried about that at all. now i'm a little bit worried, because i heard about the hyperfertility that metformin can cause... does anyone know if this will make the birth control any less effective in preventing pregnancy? i'm as 100% safe as i can be... i take my birth control the way i'm supposed to and use condoms as well, but there's still those off chances that accidents can happen like with condoms breaking and such... you never know, so i figured i would ask. i've been a little bit hesitant and afraid to take my metformin lately because i wasn't completely sure that it would effect my chances of accidentally getting pregnant. Continue reading >>

Efficacy And Safety Of Metformin Or Oral Contraceptives, Or Both In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Efficacy And Safety Of Metformin Or Oral Contraceptives, Or Both In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Efficacy and safety of metformin or oral contraceptives, or both in polycystic ovary syndrome College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju, South Korea Correspondence: Eun Joo Choi, College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, 309 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju 61452, South Korea, Tel +82 62 230 6382, Fax +82 62 222 5414, Email [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2015 Yang and Choi. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License The full terms of the License are available at . Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrinopathy that affects approximately 10% of reproductive-aged women throughout their lives. Women with PCOS present with heterogeneous symptoms including ovulatory dysfunction, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries. Therefore, lifelong individualized management should be considered. Pharmacological agents commonly used to manage the symptoms are metformin and oral contraceptive pills. Although these medications have been beneficial in treating PCOS symptoms, their efficacy and safety are still not entirely elucidated. This study aimed to report the efficacy and safety of metformin, oral contraceptives, or their combination in the treatment of PCOS and to define their specific individual roles. A literature search of original studies published in PubMed and Scopus was conducted to identify studies comparing metformin with oral contraceptives or evaluating the combination of both in PCOS. Eight clinica Continue reading >>

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