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Does Metformin Cause Excessive Thirst

Metformin =rapid Drop In Fbg, But Also New Dehydration, Thirst. Any Ideas?

Metformin =rapid Drop In Fbg, But Also New Dehydration, Thirst. Any Ideas?

Metformin =rapid drop in FBG, but also new dehydration, thirst. Any ideas? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Metformin =rapid drop in FBG, but also new dehydration, thirst. Any ideas? I went on Metformin about three and a half weeks ago. Within 7 days my FBG went from 163 to 131. During that week, and for the following week, I felt awful. Exhausted, scarily depressed, headachey. Finally, it passed and I was able to start getting some mild exercise. This has further dropped my fasting number to 120s. And rest of day is fine. Just last week I was able to start going to the gym, and do what is for me a mildly strenuous cardio/strength routine. Yesterday, I did a did a nice solid hour,( most aggressive yet), drank some water, ate dinner and a snack and went to sleep five hours later. I awoke in three hours and peed a larger volume than I ever have in my life. Like a frightening amount. And I was so dehydrated, I drank at least a gallon of water, unable to get my saliva going, and completely unable to sleep. My reading this morning was 121, which is good for me so far. (I'm really fat.) Oh, I should that my numbers had risen to 132-133 for two days before, so 121 was a drop. I should add that last's night's experience also happened, with less severity, ten nights earlier, when my FBG dropped from 131 to 118. Now I made it a habit years ago to make water my primary beverage. I've never felt dehydration unless I simply didnt drink anything. I have never been someone who needed to pee often--in fact it's kind of a joke with my friends that I've never seen anyone's bathroom--and that hadn't changed--- until the metformin. So now that Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Summary Common metformin side effects include gastrointestinal problems such as nausea, vomiting, cramps and diarrhea. Hypoglycemia and lactic acid build-up are other more serious—but more rare—side effects of metformin. Some women may also experience vitamin B12 deficiency, and children specifically may possibly experience abnormal taste bud function and appetite loss. Common Metformin Side Effects The most common side effects of metformin are gastrointestinal, and include the following: Nausea Vomiting Diarrhea Cramps Other common side effects are represented by abnormal stools, muscle pain, changes in taste sensations and occasionally difficulties in breathing. Some patients may experience side effects in the shape of dizziness, light-headedness or flu-like symptoms, while others may have nail problems, palpitations, flushing of the face or an increase in thirst and/ or sweating. Serious Metformin Side Effects Occasionally, patients may experience side effects of a more serious nature. These side effects include allergic reactions, which may be manifested through unexplained swellings hives rashes itching wheezing and / or severe breathing difficulties. In some cases, the Metformin may cause a disturbance in electrolytes, causing the body to function within an acidic environment, a condition known as lactic acidosis. Often occurring severely and suddenly, lactic acidosis is the result of increased levels of lactic acid, in particular when Metformin is used to inhibit the process of glucose production, hepatic gluconeogenesis. This condition is sometimes the result of a metformin overdose and can cause severe muscle soreness. Another more serious side effect of metformin is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. This occurs in individuals whose bodies are particularly Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that results in blood sugar, or glucose, abnormalities. This causes a host of symptoms and related complications, some of which can be life-threatening. A common symptom of high or low blood glucose is a headache. Headaches alone aren’t harmful, but they can signal that your blood sugar is out of its target range. If you have frequent headaches, diabetes may be to blame. Find out if diabetes is the cause of your headache so you can take proper action. Can diabetes cause seizures? Learn how to prevent them » Headaches are common in both children and adults. In fact, headaches are the most common source of pain. They’re also a leading cause for days missed from work and school. Headaches are a frequent problem among the American population, but there are numerous causes. Headaches are classified as being primary or secondary. Primary headaches occur when brain cells or nerves, blood vessels, or muscles around the head send pain signals to the brain. Migraines and tension headaches are common examples. Secondary headaches, on the other hand, are not directly caused by the type of pain signals mentioned above. These types of headaches are attributed to underlying health conditions or medical problems. Diabetes is one cause of secondary headaches. Other causes can include: fever or infection injury high blood pressure, or hypertension stroke anxiety or stress hormone fluctuations, such as those occurring during menstrual cycle eye disorders structural abnormalities within the brain Just as causes can vary, the pain associated with secondary headaches can vary. Headaches due to diabetes are often moderate to severe in nature, and are known to occur frequently. These headaches can be a sign that your blood glucose is either too high Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of Metformin?

What Are The Side Effects Of Metformin?

Metformin is prescribed for people with type 2 diabetes. Like any medication, it carries the risk of side effects. The most common side effects from metformin include nausea, diarrhea, gas and upset stomach. These are most likely when you first start taking it and usually go away on their own. Until they do, you should try to take your metformin with a meal. You can also try reducing the amount you take for a few days and gradually increasing it until you’ve reached the amount your doctor has prescribed for you. Lactic acidosis is a very rare -- but very serious -- side effect. It happens most often in people with liver, kidney or respiratory diseases. Call your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: weakness, stomach pain or discomfort, fast and shallow breathing, sleepiness and muscle cramping. Although metformin doesn’t cause hypoglycemia by itself, if combined with other medications, vigorous exercise or too little food, it can make your blood glucose drop too low. Since low blood glucose can be dangerous, make sure that you and your family know the symptoms. These include feeling shaky, sweaty, hungry, and irritable. If you have these symptoms, take some quick-acting sugar. Good sources are three or four glucose tablets, a half-cup of fruit juice or regular soda, or a tablespoon of honey or sugar. You should call your doctor if you have side effects that don’t go away or if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis. Metformin (prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes) can cause excessive gas and bloating, heartburn, headaches, a cough, muscle pain and a metallic taste in the mouth, but these side effects typically ease after a few weeks. Very rarely, metformin may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Key signs include w Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Under Control But Still Excessive Thirst & Urination

Type 2 Diabetes Under Control But Still Excessive Thirst & Urination

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 Diabetes Under Control But Still Excessive Thirst & Urination I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes several years ago. I'm in my late 20s. I take Metformin 850mg/day. My blood sugar readings are normal. Before I was diagnosed, I was always thirsty and urinating a lot. That has not changed since my diagnosis. I want to ask how normal is it for these symptoms to continue despite the diabetes being under control? I drink 4L of water a day and urinate about 4L a day. I do have a cup of coffee in the morning (half is milk) and a small cup of black tea in the evening. I read about something called Diabetes Insipidus (which actually is not diabetes.) It too causes excessive thirst and urination but due to a lack of ADH (antidiuretic hormone). But I think it's not possible to have diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus together so that's ruled out. I mentioned my thirst and urination volume to my family doctor who just said, "diabetes does that." But from what I've read online, it's only normal to urinate up to 2.5 liters a day. So if I'm urinating 4L, something must not be right. Does anyone know anything about this or has experienced the same? I would appreciate any advice or feedback on this topic. I've decided to limit my water consumption tomorrow. According to my weight I'm only supposed to drink 2 liters. I will also avoid caffeine tomorrow. If I don't get dehydrated with 2 liters and feel fine, and if my urine looks okay (not extremely dark), then I will consider Continue reading >>

Is My Thirst Due To Diabetes?

Is My Thirst Due To Diabetes?

Recently, the question was asked: I was officially diagnosed last month with diabetes (Type 2) at the age of 43. I already have RA [rheumatoid arthritis] and hypothyroid (due to Graves’ disease). The endo prescribed metformin. My sugar levels are steady, around 114 to 129, but I am always thirsty and have sweating episodes. I constantly want water and I want it to be ice cold. I can turn up a large glass of water in one drink (non stop). Will the thirst problem eventually go away? Both sides of family has diabetes Type 2. My mother also has it and takes shots. She also craved water but she said she was never this bad. She says I should ration my water so I don’t drink too much. My reply: Thirst is a hallmark of uncontrolled diabetes, but obviously may also be due to other causes. First things first: is your thirst due to uncontrolled diabetes? I’m missing some key bits of information to help decide. I’d like to know if your measured blood glucose (BG) levels, which you describe as 114 to 129, are representative of your around-the-clock levels. If indeed they are, and you don’t have any BG levels over about 180 mg/dl (10 mmol/L), it’s unlikely that your thirst is due to diabetes. The reason is that the thirst of uncontrolled diabetes is due to urinary loss of sugar and subsequent loss of fluids. In other words, if you pee a lot, you’ll get thirsty. So, measure your BG at different times of the day, especially several hours after large meals, to see if your BG numbers are intermittently - or perhaps mostly - higher than you expect. Another way to assess if your thirst is due to high blood sugar is to measure urine sugar levels (something we don’t often recommend in the 21st century, although for many years it was the only way to assess diabetes at home). T Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Drink More Water

Drink More Water

Last month I was taken to the emergency room because my blood pressure dropped. It turned out I had gone low because of dehydration. I’m really embarrassed because I hadn’t realized how important hydration is. It was scary. I could sit up, but only for about a minute. Then I’d have to lie down again. Couldn’t even think about standing (which is hard enough for me on a good day). I was in the ER for about 12 hours getting IV fluids before I was strong enough to go home. Lord knows what it will cost, and all because I didn’t drink enough. I didn’t know I had a viral infection. They found that on a white blood count in the ER. But I did know I was eating lots of fiber, which absorbs water, and not drinking much. I just didn’t know I could get in so much physical trouble from a little dryness. For people with diabetes, the risk of dehydration is greater, because higher than normal blood glucose depletes fluids. To get rid of the glucose, the kidneys will try to pass it out in the urine, but that takes water. So the higher your blood glucose, the more fluids you should drink, which is why thirst is one of the main symptoms of diabetes. According to the British diabetes site diabetes.co.uk, other causative factors for dehydration include insufficient fluid intake, sweating because of hot weather or exercise, alcohol, diarrhea, or vomiting. The symptoms of mild dehydration include thirst, headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, fatigue, and dark-colored urine. Severe dehydration causes all those symptoms plus low blood pressure, sunken eyes, weak pulse and/or rapid heartbeat, confusion, and lethargy. But many people, especially older people, don’t get these symptoms. It seems that thirst signals become weaker as we age. Diabetes may get people used to thirst s Continue reading >>

Will Metformin Reduce Frequent Thirst And Urination Caused By Type 2 Diabetes?

Will Metformin Reduce Frequent Thirst And Urination Caused By Type 2 Diabetes?

Thirst and urination are symptoms of high blood glucose, which has serious effects on your eyes, kidneys, pancreas and limbs. It is not a symptom of well-controlled diabetes. If you have those symptoms often, your diabetes is out of control and will deteriorate. I think it is important for either type of diabetes to get a glucose meter (even if your doctor has not asked you to) and learn how your blood glucose works. You want to keep that blood glucose within close to normal numbers at all times. If Metformin can do it, take Metformin. If not, take insulin or whatever your doctor recommends. But do not be passive about this. Become an expert on diabetes. Your organs and limbs depend on your understanding and your informed habits. Not your doctor’s. Yours. Read the whole internet until you are very good at diabetes, if you want your body to work for another 40 years. Start here: Blood Sugar 101 Continue reading >>

Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin For Diabetes

Take metformin just after a meal or with a snack. The most common side-effects are feeling sick, diarrhoea and tummy (abdominal) pain. These symptoms usually pass after the first few days of treatment. Keep your regular appointments with your doctor and clinics. This is so your progress can be checked. About metformin Type of medicine A biguanide antidiabetic medicine Used for Type 2 diabetes mellitus Also called Bolamyn®; Diagemet®; Glucient®; Glucophage®; Metabet®; Sukkarto® Available as Tablets and modified-release tablets; oral liquid medicine; sachets of powder Insulin is a hormone which is made naturally in your body, in the pancreas. It helps to control the levels of sugar (glucose) in your blood. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if it does not use the insulin it makes effectively, this results in the condition called sugar diabetes (diabetes mellitus). People with diabetes need treatment to control the amount of sugar in their blood. This is because good control of blood sugar levels reduces the risk of complications later on. Some people can control the sugar in their blood by making changes to the food they eat but, for other people, medicines like metformin are given alongside the changes in diet. Metformin allows the body to make better use of the lower amount of insulin which occurs in the kind of diabetes known as type 2 diabetes. Metformin can be given on its own, or alongside insulin or another antidiabetic medicine. There are a number of tablets available which contain metformin in combination with one of these other antidiabetic medicines (brands include Jentadueto®, Competact®, Komboglyze®, Janumet®, and Eucreas®). Taking a combination tablet like these can help to reduce the total number of tablets that need to be taken each d Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Synjardy - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

Synjardy - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Empagliflozin - metformin is a combination of 2 medications that work in different ways to reduce blood sugar. Both empagliflozin and metformin belong to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics. This medication is used by adults with type 2 diabetes who are already taking empagliflozin and metformin as separate tablets and have good glucose control. It may also be used along with insulin or other oral hypoglycemic medications if blood glucose hasnt been well controlled on metformin plus the other medication. Empagliflozin - metformin is intended to be used as part of an overall diabetes management plan that includes diet and exercise. Empagliflozin works by increasing the amount of glucose being removed from the body by the kidneys, which decreases the amount of sugar in the blood. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doc Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Warning Sign Of Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Warning Sign Of Condition

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. The condition can cause long-term complications - and increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney damage. However it can alter the way the body works in the short-term. People with diabetes have an increase risk of dehydration as high blood glucose levels can lead to decreased hydration in the body. Symptoms of dehydration can include thirst, headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, tiredness and dark coloured urine. Often, feeling thirsty is the last symptom of dehydration and irritability and tiredess can come first. People are also considered to be dehydrated if they urinate less than four times a day. Symptoms of severe dehydration can include low blood pressure, a weak pulse or rapid heart rate and feeling confused. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. If you feel thirsty all the time it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body If our blood glucose levels are higher than they should be for prolonged periods of time, the kidneys will work to get rid some of the excess glucose from the blood and excrete this as urine. While the kidneys filter the blood in this way, water will also be removed from the blood and will need replenishing and this is why we tend to have increase thirst when blood sugar levels are too high. Continue reading >>

Apo-metformin

Apo-metformin

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Metformin 500, 850 or 1000 tablets. It contains the active ingredient metformin (as metformin hydrochloride). It is used to treat type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or maturity onset diabetes) in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. Your doctor may have prescribed this medicine for another reason. This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription. How it works Metformin lowers high blood glucose by helping your body make better Continue reading >>

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