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Does Metformin Cause Dry Eyes

Say Goodbye To Dry Eye

Say Goodbye To Dry Eye

Eye problems, such as diabetic retinopathy and macular edema, are well-known complications of diabetes. Fortunately, these conditions can be treated and even prevented if caught early (which is why getting an annual dilated eye exam is so important for people who have diabetes). What is dry eye? Another eye problem that’s more common in people who have diabetes is dry eye. According to the National Eye Institute, dry eye is a condition in which the eye does not produce tears properly. It can also involve tears not having the right consistency or evaporating too quickly. Tears are necessary to help maintain moisture on the surface of the eye and for clear vision. In many cases the surface of the eye becomes inflamed; if not treated, pain, ulcers, scars, and possibly loss of some vision can occur. Between 10% and 30% of the population suffer from dry eye. One study showed that people who have diabetes have a 50% chance of getting dry eye. What causes dry eye? There are a lot of causes of dry eye, including: Age: The older we get, the drier the eyes can get. Most people over the age of 65 have some degree of dry eye. Gender: Women are more likely to have dry eye than men, thanks to hormonal changes. Medications: Blood pressure medications, birth control pills, antihistamines, decongestants, and antidepressants can reduce tear production. Medical conditions: Having diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and thyroid problems, along with certain eye problems, raise the risk of dry eye. Research shows that dry eye in people with diabetes is typically linked with a type of neuropathy called autonomic neuropathy; this neuropathy can affect the nerves that control tear production. Environment: Dry, windy, or smoky climates increase dry eye risk. Staring at a computer screen all Continue reading >>

Review Of Cornea And Contact Lenses > Which Oral Meds Cause Dry Eye?

Review Of Cornea And Contact Lenses > Which Oral Meds Cause Dry Eye?

As dry eye remains a persistent problem, practitioners need to review the medications that may cause dry eye symptoms. D ry eye is a multi-factoral disease of the tears and ocular surface; one such factor is the patients use of systemic medications.1 Many common systemic medications can affect ocular tissues, and medications that contribute to dry eye symptoms are present in many categories of commonly prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) medications. According to one estimate, four out of every five U.S. adults will use prescription medicines, over-the-counter drugs or dietary supplements in any given week, and nearly one-third of adults will take five or more different medications in the same timeframe.2 Older patients may be at greater risk for medication side effects because they often take multiple prescription medications. Of our patients who take six or more medications a week, at least half receive prescriptions from three or more physicians!3 In this article we will discuss several categories of pharmaceuticals, each containing medications that can produce dry eye symptoms. Pharmaceuticals that can cause dry eye symptoms include certain medications used to treat hypertension such as central-acting agents and diuretics; antihistamines and decongestants, in concert with anticholinergics; hormones; certain antidepressants; pain relievers, such as ibuprofen and lortab; and dermatologic agents. Physicians prescribe systemic beta blockers to treat angina pectoris, essential hypertension, myocardial infarctions and migraine headaches.4 Beta blockers reduce lysozyme levels and immunoglobulin A, causing a decrease in aqueous production and subsequently leading to symptoms of dry eye.5 Patients using beta blockers also exhibit corneal anesthesia, decreased tear film br Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dry Eye: The Forgotten Connection

Diabetes And Dry Eye: The Forgotten Connection

12th Annual Diabetes Report At least half of patients with diabetes also exhibit dry eye symptoms. Assess these patients from the start. Goal Statement: Diabetes is often associated with several significant ocular conditions, such as retinopathy, refractive changes, cataracts, nerve palsies, glaucoma and macular edema. However, one of the most common ocular complications associated with diabetes is dry eye. This article traces the complex relationship between diabetes and dry eye, and explores several potential management strategies for controlling both conditions. Faculty/Editorial Board: Milton M. Hom, O.D. Credit Statement: This course is COPE approved for 2 hours of CE credit. COPE ID is 28593-GL. Check with your local state licensing board to see if this counts toward your CE requirement for relicensure. Joint-Sponsorship Statement: This continuing education course is joint-sponsored by the Pennsylvania College of Optometry. Disclosure Statement: Dr. Hom is a consultant to Abbott Medical Optics, Allergan, CIBA Vision, CooperVision, Baush + Lomb, Inspire Pharmaceuticals and Essilor. Are we seeing more patients with diabetes today than two decades ago? Yes–– without question. Diabetes used to be just another condition. Now, it is an epidemic. In fact, diabetes is quickly emerging as one of the biggest health-related catastrophes the world has ever witnessed.1 And, the problem is not exclusive to the United States. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there will be 370 million people with diabe tes on the planet by 2030, which is nearly twice the figure reported in 2000.2 In the United States alone, 11.3% of adults have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes.3 Furthermore, the treatment costs are overwhelming. Each year, $174 billion is spent on medication Continue reading >>

Will You Have Dry Eyes With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Dry Eyes With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Drug comparison of Lipitor, Crestor for a 72 year old man NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Will You Have Dry Eye With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Dry Eye With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 51 year old woman who takes Zanaflex, Fiorinal, Norco, Lamictal NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Can Glyburide And/or Metformin Cause Redness Of The Eyes?

Can Glyburide And/or Metformin Cause Redness Of The Eyes?

Can glyburide and/or metformin cause redness of the eyes? Every morning my eyes are red and then throughout the day day stay a pinkish red and never clear up. They are also dry. I only noticed this after starting my diabetic meds - glyburide and metformin. Can one or both of these be the cause? Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome when using Glyburide/Metformin: Diarrhea; headache; indigestion; mild stomach pain; nausea; stomach upset; vomiting. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Glyburide/Metformin: Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); chest pain or discomfort; confusion; dark urine; dizziness or lightheadedness; fainting; fast or difficult breathing; feeling of being unusually cold; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; general feeling of being unwell; low blood sugar symptoms (eg, anxiety, dizziness, fast heartbeat, headache, tremors, unusual sweating); muscle pain or weakness; severe or persistent blurred vision or other vision problems; slow or irregular heartbeat; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual drowsiness; unusual or persistent stomach pain or discomfort; unusual tiredness or weakness; yellowing of the eyes or skin. Although redness if the eyes is not a known side effect ... it could be caused by these medicines. Please discuss it with your doctor if you haven't done so already. Continue reading >>

Will You Have Dry Eye Syndrome With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Dry Eye Syndrome With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 63 year old woman who takes Lexapro NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

I started metformin on January 9th I'm thinking these side effects are worse than the elevated blood sugar. My stomach has been a terrible mess since starting it. I've been dry heaving since Sunday evening and making multiple restroom trips and finally tonight I'm vomiting. Do these side effects go away if not I'm going to be in some serious trouble because I can't even tolerate to take my congestive Heart failure meds Or my heart meds without vomiting immediately. D.D. Family Type 2 since June 2014, levemir & metformin Are you taking it with a meal? I got some stomach pain and the runs when I first started it, but I learned to take it with a fairly sizable meal when first starting to minimize those effects. I'm over 6 months into metformin use and my system is very used to it. It does take several months for it to really "kick-in" in my case. I never vomited from it but I did feel fairly nauseous in those early months, especially if taken outside of meals. There is also metformin ER which might help if things do not improve for you. The ER (extended release) is milder as it is designed to absorb slower and more gently. For breakfast I ate a string cheese stick a half of English muffin and 1/4 of a cup of yogurt so I guess the answer would be no I have not been eating very much before taking it. I will ask about the metformin ER Please do ask about the ER version!!! Since I was switched to the ER version 12 years ago (take mine at night) makes no difference with or without food....there have been no issues at all. Vicky A1Cs at DX 2002 7.2 7/14 8.8 1/15 4.8 4/15 4.8 9/15 5.2 3/16 5.4 11/17 5.2 The ER version usually helps most D's. But for a small percentage the side effects are too much. If you are in that subset you may need another med. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx' Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Problems With Vision? Is It Permanent?

Can Metformin Cause Problems With Vision? Is It Permanent?

I’m afraid there is no simple answer to this one. But there is a clear way ahead. Let me explain. If you get blurry vision as soon as you start the metformin, there are some experts who say that this is could be a good sign. How come? Well, diabetes affects vision and you could have been losing your eyesight gradually, as your sugar levels went up over months and years. You are not even aware of this change in vision, because the loss is so gradual. RELATED: If You Take Metformin, You Need These Nutritional Supplements As soon as you start the metformin, your sugar suddenly comes under control and your eyes suddenly cannot adjust to the new, lower blood sugar, causing the blurry vision. The answer therefore could be to lower your starting metformin dose and then slowly, increase it over a few weeks/months, giving your body and your eyes a chance to adjust. The blurry vision could disappear with this. However, if you have started to experience blurry vision after using metformin for a few years, the answer could be very different. This form of vision loss happens due to loss of Vitamin B12 from the body, because Metformin interferes with our ability to absorb this vitamin from food. Vitamin B12 forms the protective sheath or insulation of all nerves in the body, including the one that is critical for vision, the optic nerve. When the optic nerve is damaged due to prolonged metformin use, the right solution is to immediately supplement with Vitamin B12. You should also know that with long term use, metformin also interferes with our ability to use two other vital nutrients, Vitamin B9 and Co Enzyme Q10 in the human body. This can cause a range of side effects – from hair loss and insomnia and heart palpitations to unexplained muscle pains. The real answer – to both Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin is the generic name of the prescription medications Glucophage, Glumetza, and Fortamet, used to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a disease that occurs when the body does not produce or use insulin normally, which results in high blood sugar (glucose). Metformin works by decreasing the amount of sugar you absorb from food and reducing the amount of glucose your liver makes. It also increases your body's response to insulin. Metformin is in a class of medications called biguanides. It's sometimes used along with diet, exercise, and other medications to control blood glucose levels. It's also used to prevent the development of diabetes in people at high risk for the disease, treat polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and control weight gain that occurs from taking certain drugs. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the medication in 1994. Metformin and PCOS (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome) Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder that affects about one in 10 women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS may have enlarged ovaries containing fluid, or follicles. These fluids may cause infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods, excess hair growth, acne, and weight gain. The exact cause of PCOS is unknown, but the disorder has been linked to insulin resistance and excess insulin in the body. If you have insulin resistance, your body cannot use insulin effectively. As a result, your pancreas has to secrete more insulin to make glucose available to cells and tissues, including those that compose the ovaries. Researchers believe excess insulin may affect the ovaries by increasing androgen production, which may interfere with the ovaries' ability to ovulate. Because metformin can increase your body’s response Continue reading >>

Diabetesdiscussions > Severe Dry Eyes With Metformin?

Diabetesdiscussions > Severe Dry Eyes With Metformin?

Has anyone noticed any dramatic changes in the dryness of their eyes on metformin? I have been on it for 4 weeks now. Started with 500mg at bedtime the 1st week, then increased up to 2000mg at bedtime currently. I have had my eyeglasses changed 3 weeks ago, from a very bad prescription, when my bg levels were like 280. (No,I wasnt taking care of myself.) I saw fine with the new glasses until last week, when all went blurry again. My bg is now 90, and I can only see out of the glasses I had when my levels were sky high. My eye doc says that I have no traces or symptoms of diabetes in my eyes. I feel like I am going insane. Theres no way I should be able to see with my old glasses. No eye drops, or eye gels are helping. Any suggestions? Thank you, Ann 2000mg metformin, 2mg prandin x3 Are you a newly diagnosed diabetic? Did you know your numbers were so high when you went to the dr? Did you tell him? My thoughts are, the old glasses were the right prescription, then your numbers went high, which causes blurry vision due to the higher glucose levels and your glasses weren't right. You had just gone on metformin to lower your glucose levels the week before and after a few weeks it has brought your numbers down to where they should be, bringing your eyesight back to where it was before, making the new glasses too strong for you now. I'm surprised your eye dr made changes if he had known you had diabetes and had just started a new medication to bring the numbers down. The eye exam should have taken place after being on metformin for several months giving it a chance to do it's magic for you so the exam would have been more accurate. Geri in Co:Byetta(3-06),Glucophage XR, Glucotrol XL, NPH Anydaynow: I agree with Geri that your eyes were responding to the high BG levels when y Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Cause Dry Eyes

Drugs That Can Cause Dry Eyes

It may seem like a minor annoyance to someone who doesnt experience this symptom. But just ask anyone who suffers from dry eyes what it feels like and you will hear some serious woe and misery. Imagine sandpaper under your eyelids. If you have ever gotten a foreign object in your eye you know how distressing that can feel until you get it out. Now consider what it would be like if you could not remove it and instead had a constant gritty, burning, scratching or stinging sensation that never goes away. This incredibly unpleasant condition can be caused by a number of things. Dry eyes can be triggered by reduced tear production or increased evaporation from the surface of the eye. In some people the immune system attacks the tear glands just as it destroys other body tissue. This can lead to dry eyes in rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and Sjogrens syndrome. Conditions that reduce the corneas sensitivity reduce blinking and tear production, too. That is why diabetes, herpes eye infection and laser eye surgery (LASIK) may sometimes result in dry eyes. In certain cases, this reaction may be severe and can last for months or even years. This has a serious impact on quality of life and explains why some people may be dissatisfied with the outcome of their LASIK surgery. Physicians and pharmacists rarely mention dry eyes as a drug side effect. That may be because it doesnt seem like such a big deal, especially compared to serious side effects like liver or kidney damage, heart attack or stroke. But just ask someone with dry eyes how it affects their quality of life and you will quickly learn that this is not a minor complication. And treating drug-induced dry eyes with eye drops might be a little like trying to slake your thirst in the middle of the desert with an eye dropper of w Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Dry Skin And Blisters In The Fingers And Finger Joint Inflammation?

Does Metformin Cause Dry Skin And Blisters In The Fingers And Finger Joint Inflammation?

Home Q & A Questions Does metformin cause dry skin... Does metformin cause dry skin and blisters in the fingers and finger joint inflammation? diabetes, type 2 , insulin resistance , dry skin , metformin , blister , skin , inflammation , finger I would like to add some more details I was on 3 medications acorbose starlix generic version and tanzeum and or metformin. My work is very hectic and a1c was 11.43 a year ago and now brought to 7.1. But due to the fingers joint inflammation I couldn't bend my fingers. Last month I stopped all medicines and I tried kale shake daily with avocado apple celery carrots and mixed peanuts and avoided all my regular food I had been taking. My fingers dramatically healed in a months time. Now sugar level is uneven now. What are the options I have should I start the medicines? After three years, I have learned to live with several side effects- I am certain that every person reacts differently. Dry skin? Yes, almost immediately. Even now, at least once a week I will wake up scratching one hand or the other until blood comes. I also have dry eyes and sinuses, and suspect drying in my bronchial tubes. I am a pipe smoker, but I never actually "coughed-up" things before Tramadol. I was starting to suffer a little from arthritis in my hands, but I believe the Tram has accelerated the joint inflammation and calcium deposits, to the point that I can no longer enjoy my constant companions of 50 years, my 12-string guitars. The Tramadol does an excellent job with my blood glucose though, with my fast BG averaging in the 80's and my A1C rock-steady at 5.2. Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Dry Eyes?

Can Metformin Cause Dry Eyes?

Pepcid vs. Prilosec Vestura vs. Yaz Rephresh Pro B Side Effects Lacri Lube Alternative Primolut N Weight Gain Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

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