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Does Metformin Cause Drowsiness

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Side Effects

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indigestion loss of appetite metallic taste in the mouth passing of gas stomachache stom Continue reading >>

Apo-metformin

Apo-metformin

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Metformin 500, 850 or 1000 tablets. It contains the active ingredient metformin (as metformin hydrochloride). It is used to treat type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or maturity onset diabetes) in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. Your doctor may have prescribed this medicine for another reason. This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription. How it works Metformin lowers high blood glucose by helping your body make better Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sleep Disorders

Metformin And Sleep Disorders

Go to: Abstract Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug. Deterioration of sleep is an important unwanted side effect of metformin. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem. Keywords: Metformin, sleep disorders, side effect Go to: Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disorder. Millions of patients have to use anti-diabetic drugs. A widely used oral anti-diabetic drug is metformin (C4H11N5 · HCl). Under fasting conditions, about 50 % bioavailability of metformin has been observed.[1] After ingestion, metformin is slowly absorbed and reaches its peak level in blood in 1-3 hours, and its elimination half-life is about 1.5-6 hours.[1] The main route of metformin elimination is tubular secretion.[1] Metformin use results in decreased hepatic glucose production and decreased intestinal absorption of glucose.[1] In addition, metformin can help improve insulin sensitivity via increasing peripheral glucose uptake and utilization.[1] Similar to other drugs, adverse effects of metformin are reported. These can result in poor compliance of the diabetic patient,[1] causing an irregular intake of the drug.[1] Apart from the well known ill effects of hypoglycemia and diarrhea, other unwanted effects of metformin have also been observed. The effect of metformin on sleep is interesting. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem. Go to: METFORMIN – INDUCED INSOMNIA Metformin – induced insomnia is widely mentioned in old and obese diabetic patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus recently and prescribed with metformin. The development of insomnia can be seen within a few days after starting metformin. This is an interesting unwanted effect that is not quoted in other antidiabetic drugs Continue reading >>

Important Information About The Side Effects Of

Important Information About The Side Effects Of

JANUMET What is the most important information I should know about JANUMET? Serious side effects can happen in people taking JANUMET, including: 1. Lactic Acidosis. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET, can cause a rare but serious condition called lactic acidosis (a buildup of an acid in the blood) that can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency and must be treated in the hospital. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: you feel cold in your hands or feet you feel dizzy or lightheaded you have a slow or irregular heartbeat you feel very weak or tired you have unusual (not normal) muscle pain you have trouble breathing you feel sleepy or drowsy you have stomach pains, nausea or vomiting Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance for getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye have liver problems drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term "binge" drinking get dehydrated (lose a large amount of body fluids). This can happen if you are sick with a fever, vomiting, or diarrhea. Dehydration can also happen when you sweat a lot with activity or exercise and do not drink enough fluids have surgery have a heart attack, severe infection, or stroke The best way to keep from having a problem with lactic acidosis from metformin is to tell your doctor if you have any of the problems in the list above. Your doctor may decide to stop your JANUMET for a while if you have any of these things. 2. Continue reading >>

Fortamet Side Effects Center

Fortamet Side Effects Center

Fortamet (metformin hydrochloride) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Fortamet is available in generic form. Common side effects of Fortamet include headache, muscle pain, nausea, vomiting, stomach upset or pain, diarrhea, gas, weakness, or a metallic taste in the mouth. Fortamet does not usually cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Low blood sugar may occur if Fortamet is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Fortamet including shortness of breath, swelling or rapid weight gain, fever, body aches, or flu symptoms. Fortamet should be taken once daily. Dosage is individualized based on effectiveness and tolerance. The maximum recommended daily dose is 2500 mg. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may result if you take Fortamet with drugs that raise blood sugar, such as: isoniazid, diuretics (water pills), steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid medicine, birth control pills and other hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills, or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may result if you take Fortamet with drugs that lower blood sugar, such as: alcohol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or probenecid. It may also interact with furosemide, nifedipine, cimetidine or ranitidine, amiloride or triamterene, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, or Continue reading >>

Will You Have Drowsiness With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Drowsiness With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 60 year old man who takes Zyrtec Allergy, Lisinopril NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Excessive Daytime Sleepiness And Long Naps May Be A Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

Excessive Daytime Sleepiness And Long Naps May Be A Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

Excessive Daytime Sleepiness And Long Naps May Be A Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes We all get tired throughout the day; 2 p.m. hitsand suddenly youre searching for the coffee pot with your eyes half closed. But could being tired throughout your day indicate something more? Researchers from the University of Tokyo foundevidence that this might be so. Presenting their findings at the annual meeting of the European Association for the study of Diabetes (EASD), theyhave reason to believe sleepiness throughout the day, along with taking longer daytime naps may be linked to type 2 diabetes . Sleep is not only a blissful experience, it is also essential to your health. Though we need a good nights sleep to recuperate from our day, and consolidate memories from our waking hours ,sleep in excess can be detrimental to ourhealth. According to the study, led by Dr. Tomohide Yamada of the University of Tokyo, daytime sleepiness, along with napping, is rampant around the world. While most people know to keep their naps brief, others will nap for hours on end, and this canbe potentially dangerous. In addition to this, researchers have found that naps can become habitual, as people will carve out a few minutes to a few hours each day just for sleeping. To find the possible repercussions of excessive sleepiness and napping, researchers conducted a meta-analysis of a range of international studies regarding sleep and type 2 diabetes. Looking through varioussources, includingMedline, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science, researchers selected 10 studies consisting of 261,365 people. The studies came from a multitude of different countries, with research selected from Sweden Spain, Finland, and Germany to assess the effects of daytime sleepiness, and the USA, China, and Germany to evaluate the ef Continue reading >>

Sleep Effects Of Metformin

Sleep Effects Of Metformin

Metformin, or Glucophage, is a drug given to diabetics to help them control their blood sugars. Like other prescription medications, Metformin can affect a person's sleep, and long-term users should be aware of one rare condition that causes extreme fatigue. Symptoms Even diabetics who are not insulin dependent need to be wary of any symptoms that include severe fatigue, tiredness or drowsiness. This can be a sign of high blood sugar, the last step before a diabetic coma. Drug Interactions Do not drink alcohol with Metformin. Mixing both substances can cause serious side effects on sugars, creating drowsiness and health problems. Lactic acidosis is a rare condition that can occur when taking Metformin, and it may be signaled by severe drowsiness, chills and muscle pain. Although rare, this illness needs immediate attention, because it can be fatal. Effect On Sleep Metformin itself may not cause sleep problems, but many conditions related to its use can trigger them because diabetics are prone to disorders like sleep apnea, obesity and insomnia. Hormonal conditions and peripheral neuropathy, with its nerve pain, also affects the ability to fall into restful sleep. Sleep Hygiene Practice good sleep hygiene, since even sleep apnea can bring on weight gain and affect sugar levels. This condition is linked to low leptin, an agent that helps in the metabolism of carbohydrates, leading the patient to crave more of them. Additional Conditions In rare cases outside of blood sugar, Metformin has caused nervousness, insomnia and other side effects related to sleep. A doctor should be alerted if any of these symptoms occur. Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Drowsiness?

Can Metformin Cause Drowsiness?

Well turns out the Metformin did cause my Headache, my ... "Well turns out the Metformin did cause my Headache, my rapid heartbeat, and my drowsiness, it gave my low blood sugar! Today I got the same headache, and the drowsiness, but knew what it was, so I ate a few shock tarts and was fine. I am still gonna talk to my dr. about it though, cause that was with only 5oo mg not the full 2ooo mg like she wants me on, I am hoping she will prescribe me the Extended Release Metformin instead, as far as AF goes well, she is here, thats all read more... I can say. Im having more cramping than I normally do, Dh found me this new excedrine menstrual rapid release gels and they are great! Umm... Dh and I went through all the baby stuff we have bought over the years and I have to say holy cow, we have 5 totes FULL, one of them is taped cause the lid kept popping off! haha! i am such a nerd, but buying baby stuff eases the pain ya know? My weight loss is going pretty good! i have lost 12 pounds so far! I think that is about it right now! I hope all of you ladies have a good day, and keep cool, I am off to soak in a hot bath see if it wont make my cramps a lil better!" Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

Dealing With Diabetes Fatigue

Dealing With Diabetes Fatigue

“My days have been getting shorter,” Ron (who has Type 2 diabetes) told me. “I sleep ten hours a night and still need naps in the day. Even when I’m awake, I’m dragging. What can I do?” Ron’s doctor wasn’t much help. At his last appointment six weeks ago, Ron’s A1c was 8.1, and the doc started him on nateglinide (brand name Starlix), but his energy level hasn’t improved. At family picnics, he just watches or naps while the others play softball. “I’m starting to feel depressed, like life is passing me by” he told me. Excessive tiredness like Ron’s is often called fatigue. It’s one of the classic symptoms of diabetes and many other illnesses. But what causes it and what can you do about it? Most experts blame insulin resistance for the fatigue. If your cells are resisting glucose, they won’t have enough fuel, so they tire out. At the same time, the glucose level in your blood will be higher than normal, so blood flows less well (similar to if there were sugar in your car’s gas tank), which could also be tiring. Hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) can also cause fatigue. Blood glucose is far from the whole story, though. Inflammation makes people very tired. Part of the inflammatory response includes cytokines and white blood cells that influence the nervous system and tell us to sleep. That’s why people are so tired with the flu; our immune systems are trying to get us to rest. If you have chronic inflammation, which many people with diabetes do, that could cause fatigue. Infection is another source of fatigue. Our bodies need all the energy they can get to fight the invading germs, so less energy is available for other things. Infection also causes inflammation and can raise blood glucose levels. So someone in Ron’s situation should inv Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

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