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Does Metformin Cause Brain Damage

Taking Metformin? Here’s Everything You Need To Know

Taking Metformin? Here’s Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is often the first drug prescribed to people who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Taken orally, metformin helps to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin is often used in combination with other drugs to treat diabetes. Without the proper long-term management of diabetes, it can cause serious health complications. One of the best ways to accomplish this is through the proper use of medications such as metformin and making appropriate lifestyle changes. If you’d like to learn about some of the other medications used to treat type 2 diabetes, please click here. How Metformin Works for Type 2 Diabetics Metformin is prescribed for type 2 diabetes because it can help control blood sugar spikes. So, how does this diabetes drug do this? . The drug reduces the amount of glucose (sugar) your liver produces and how much your body absorbs. Thus, metformin will increase the effect that insulin has on your body. In addition to increasing the body’s insulin sensitivity, patients often report a drop in their cholesterol levels. Metformin can impact your appetite, which results in fewer calories consumed and weight loss. Losing excess weight will also improve your body’s sensitivity to insulin. Please note that metformin should not be solely relied on to treat high blood sugar levels. Diet and exercise are crucial to proper management of your diabetes. This combined with a stable dosage of metformin can be very effective. What are the Side Effects Associated with Metformin? As with any drug, metformin does come with the risk of side effects. These can range from mild to severe. Less severe side effects usually subside within a few days to a couple weeks. If your side effects persist or get worse, alert your healthcare provider imediately. Metformin can cause Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Constipation Mail

Can Metformin Cause Constipation Mail

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Is Metformin Worth The Risk? It Could Be Making You Worse

Is Metformin Worth The Risk? It Could Be Making You Worse

Today I want to share with you a published study that came out in 2010 about how Metformin®, a Type 2 diabetes drug, causes B12 deficiency. Isn’t that interesting? Kind of a Catch-22 wouldn't you say? Why do people start taking Metformin? Well, they take it because they get diagnosed with high blood sugar or Type 2 diabetes. And a complication from having Type 2 diabetes is increased risk for cardiovascular disease. But here’s the thing: The medication that you’re taking for the diabetes could be making you worse. See, when you deplete the body of B12, now you’re at risk for – guess what? – cardiovascular disease. B12 is not only important for reducing homocysteine. It’s what we call a methyl donor. It’s also important in preventing neuropathy, which is another complication that we often see with people that have Type 2 diabetes. If you’re taking Metformin, or you’re thinking about taking Metformin, ask your doctor if they know about this study. Now, they may tell you, “Yeah, but that study says it takes years to become deficient,” and that may be true. It may take years to become deficient, but it doesn’t take years to start depleting your B12 levels and impacting your health. You have to ask yourself is it worth all that? Is it worth that risk to take Metformin or could you look for some other avenues? Could you look for another way, a functional model if you will, of approaching this Type 2 diabetes? The model I like to use is: Treat the person, not the disease Type 2 diabetes is one of those types of conditions that has different causes. For example, 25 percent of Type 2 diabetic patients actually have a more serious condition that is devastating their body and will totally destroy their quality of life probably long before any complicatio Continue reading >>

Metformin And Impaired Thinking

Metformin And Impaired Thinking

According to new research from Australia, the oral diabetes medicine metformin is linked to impaired brain function, but supplementation with vitamin B12 may reduce some of the cognitive effects. Metformin is the most widely used diabetes drug in the world, with over 61 million prescriptions for the medicine filled in the United States alone in 2012. To evaluate the effects of the drug on cognitive impairment in people with diabetes, researchers recruited 1,354 people from various locations in Australia. The researchers included people with Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment, as well as those who were cognitively normal, but they did not include people with stroke or neurological conditions other than Alzheimer. The participants had an average age of 73.8 and almost 60% were female The study used an evaluation known as the mini-mental state exam to determine cognitive performance. According to the results, slightly more than half of the participants were not cognitively impaired, while 21.8% were minimally impaired, 17.7% were mildly impaired, and 10.1% were most impaired. In their analysis, the researchers found that people with Type 2 diabetes had worse cognitive performance than those without Type 2 and that, among those with diabetes, people taking metformin had worse cognitive performance than those not taking the medicine. Cognitive function scores were also found to be lower among those with vitamin B12 levels of less than 250 pmol/l. Because metformin is known to be associated with B12 deficiency, the investigators suggested that “any effect metformin has on cognitive performance may be at least partially mediated by altering serum vitamin B12 levels.” Limitations of the study include an insufficient amount of information about the duration of t Continue reading >>

Does Glucophage Make Alzheimers Worse?

Does Glucophage Make Alzheimers Worse?

Metformin, now theres a drug story for you. Its a startlingly small molecule , the sort of thing that chemists look and and say Thats a real drug? It kicked around in the literature and the labs in the 1960s, was marketed in Europe in the 1980s but was shopped around in the US for quite a while, partly because a lot of people had just that reaction. (It didnt help that a couple of other drugs in the same structural class turned out to cause lactic acidosis and had to be pulled from use). Bristol-Myers Squibb finally took metformin up, though, and did extremely well with it in the end under the brand name Glucophage. Its now generic, and continues to be widely prescribed for Type II diabetes. But for many years, no one had a clue how it worked. It not only went all the way through clinical trials and FDA approval without a mechanism, it was nearly to the end of its patent lifetime before a plausible mechanism became clear. Its now generally accepted that metformin is an activator (somehow, maybe through another enzyme called LKB1 ) of adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK), and that many (most?) of its effects are probably driven through that pathway. AMPKs a central player in a lot of metabolic processes, so this proposal is certainly plausible. But never think that you completely understand these things (and, as a corollary, never trust anyone who tries to convince you that they do). A new paper in PNAS advances the potentially alarming hypothesis that metformin may actually exacerbate the pathology of Alzheimers disease. This hasnt been proven in humans yet, but the evidence that the authors present makes a strong case that someone should check this out quickly. Theres a strong connection between insulin, diabetes, and brain function. Actually, there are a lot of stro Continue reading >>

In Some Patients Metformin Impairs Thinking

In Some Patients Metformin Impairs Thinking

The widely acclaimed diabetes drug metformin was linked with impaired brain function in patients who took the drug, although supplementation with vitamin B12 may alleviate metformin-induced deficiencies, according to new research. In a retrospective study, diabetic patients who were taking metformin had worse cognitive performance than those not taking the drug (odds ratio 2.23, 95% CI 1.05-4.75), Eileen Moore, PhD, of the University of Melbourne in Australia, and colleagues reported online in Diabetes Care. Additionally, patients with diabetes who had vitamin B12 levels less than 250 pmol/L also had worse cognitive performance (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.12-4.66), and the association between metformin and cognitive impairment was weakened after adjusting for vitamin B12 levels, they stated. "Increased monitoring of cognitive ability in patients with diabetes who use metformin is warranted, particularly among older adults," they wrote, adding that "prospective trials are warranted to assess the beneficial effects of vitamin B12 and calcium use on cognition in older people with diabetes who are taking metformin." Metformin has been hailed as a sort of wonder drug, with benefits in a number of comorbidities including heart disease and cancer. But some research has suggested that it's not such a boon to cognitive outcomes, mainly because of its association with vitamin B12 deficiency. To assess the effects of the drug on cognitive performance, the researchers looked at data from 1,354 patients involved in various trials: the Primary Research in Memory (PRIME) clinics study, the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers, and Lifestyle (ABIL) study, and clinical data from the Barwon region of southeastern Australia. Moore and colleagues included patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognit Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Common Brain Fog Causes: Top Sources Of Brain Fatigue Nutrex Hawaii

Common Brain Fog Causes: Top Sources Of Brain Fatigue Nutrex Hawaii

Common Causes of Brain Fog: How to Deal with Brain and Mental Fatigue As the body ages, one's memory can slowly start to fade and momentary lapses of confused thinking can become more common. This is a natural process but in some cases brain fog and fatigue can be accelerated by certain situations or conditions. Understanding the common causes of brain fatigue is essential for maintaining good health practices that will keep the brain clear-thinking and healthy for as long as possible. Brain fog, also commonly known as brain fatigue, can be a mild to severe episode of mental confusion that can strike without warning. When this occurs, it is common to experience a lack of focus, poor memory recall and reduced mental acuity. If the underlying causes of the brain fog are not addressed, then the condition can continue to occur to the point that it can negatively affect one's professional and personal life. Brain fog and fatigue can be caused by a range of factors. In all cases, getting to the heart of what causes the brain fog is the key to overcoming this debilitating condition. Common causes of brain fatigue include: The brain needs sleep in order to recuperate. So, when sleep is regularly interrupted or when one suffers from a sleep disorder, they are more likely to experience brain fog in the morning upon waking. For some, a simple cup of coffee is enough to clear away the fog, but for those who suffer from serious sleep deprivation, the fog can stay for quite some time. Certain neurological disorders have brain fog as side effects of the condition. These include fibromyalgia, lupus, chronic fatigue syndrome and multiple sclerosis. Stress is very powerful and it can negatively affect the body in a number of ways, including causing brain fatigue. While this is common du Continue reading >>

Metformin For Protection Against Alzheimer's, Cancer And Heart Disease?

Metformin For Protection Against Alzheimer's, Cancer And Heart Disease?

With commentary by Nir Barzilai, MD, director of the Institute for Aging Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Brian Kennedy, PhD, president and CEO of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. Metformin may influence fundamental aging factors that underlie many age-related conditions, including cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer's, says Nir Barzilai, MD, director of the Institute for Aging Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the Bronx. "Metformin is generic, and it's cheap," Dr. Barzilai says. And accumulating data suggests that ''it interferes with the biology of aging." Aging, he says, is a primary risk factor for not only diabetes but also most of our big killers, such as Alzheimer's, heart disease and cancer. In animal and human studies, metformin has shown promise in slowing the aging process and halting diseases. To study the potential of metformin further, Dr. Barzilai plans to launch a large-scale study, Targeting Aging with METformin (TAME), to look at the effects of metformin compared to placebo. His team has already completed the MILES study, Metformin in Longevity, and are analyzing the results. In that study, they gave some participants metformin, at 1,700 milligrams a day, and others placebo. The aim was to see if the metformin could restore the gene expression profile of an older person with blood sugar problems known as impaired glucose tolerance (but not yet diabetic), to that of a younger person. Dr. Barzilai knows he has critics of his approach. He brushed them off, saying the people who don't see the value of the research ''don't understand the biology of aging and that it can be changed." He doesn't see the research as testing an anti-aging drug. "Aging is not a disease and we don't want it to be a disease," he says. Howe Continue reading >>

Don't Be Baffled By Brain Fog - The People's Pharmacy

Don't Be Baffled By Brain Fog - The People's Pharmacy

Call it what you will, brain fog, senior moment, cognitive decline, or just plain confusion, the inability to think clearly can be devastating. It affects not only the person who is befuddled, but also his family and friends. When an older person starts forgetting appointments or has difficulty balancing a checkbook, people may assume that old age is setting in. That can happen, but sometimes the problem lies with medication. A reader shared this experience: Many years ago my urologist prescribed Ditropan, and I took it for about four years. I had an hours drive to work each day and I began to realize that many days I could not remember the drive. Id arrive at work with my mind in a fuzzy state. When I picked up my refill at the pharmacy, I read about the side effects of the drug. I saw that my symptoms might be connected to the drug. I stopped taking it immediately and decided I would try to control my bladder some other way (exercises, etc.). My mental symptoms went away and I have not had any cognitive problems since. I still cope with bladder issues but I would rather be clear-headed. Medications to control overactive bladder include fesoterodine (Toviaz), oxybutynin (Ditropan) and tolterodine (Detrol). They are all classified as anticholinergic drugs. That means they can interfere with the way a neurochemical called acetylcholine functions in the body. This compound is essential for nerve communication and plays a crucial role in memory. Dozens of other drugs also have anticholinergic activity. A new study (Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, online June 24, 2011) suggests that such medications increase the risk for cognitive impairment and mortality. Anyone who would like a list of drugs with anticholinergic activity and a discussion of medications senior Continue reading >>

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

I’d like to take a moment to recognize the incredible 6-month transformation of Cynthia Bronte, one of my clients working diligently at reversing insulin resistance. This is another story that reflects the amazing mental, physical and emotional transformation that can occur with a strategic approach to plant-focused high-carbohydrate nutrition. Diagnosis with Type 2 Diabetes Cynthia was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2003, in the midst of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), an acute life-threatening condition that typically marks the onset of type 1 diabetes. Cynthia’s symptoms of DKA were unmistakable, and included urinating more than 14 times per day, insatiable thirst and low energy. Cynthia was unaware that her fasting blood sugar was 5 times higher than normal, at 550 mg/dL (normal blood sugars range from 70 – 130 mg/dL). Treatment Protocol When Cynthia was first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, she was instructed to consume a low carbohydrate diet in order to minimize blood sugar. She was instructed to eat foods that were high in protein and fat, while limiting her intake of fruits, artificial sweeteners, grains, pastas, rice, bread and cereal. As we’ve talked about in a previous article, she was initially instructed to minimize her intake of carbohydrates to minimize the amount of glucose that would eventually appear in her blood. Her diet plan followed what I refer to as “the linear diabetes nutrition model,” shown below. The problem with the linear model is that it does not address the underlying root cause of type 2 diabetes – insulin resistance. By eating a low carbohydrate diet, Cynthia was eating mainly fat and protein, resulting in increased lipid deposits in her liver and muscle tissue. In turn, increased fat storage in her liver and muscle resul Continue reading >>

Will Metformin Become The First Anti-aging Drug?

Will Metformin Become The First Anti-aging Drug?

A committed group of scientists is seeking to validate metformin as the first-ever anti-aging medication.1,2 In this day of staggering drug prices, metformin is available as a low-cost generic. One mechanism by which metformin works is by activating AMPK, an enzyme inside cells that lowers blood sugar by promoting energy utilization. Activating AMPK has broad-ranging effects that extend far beyond blood sugar control. Studies show that boosting AMPK activity can prevent—and even reverse—the life-shortening effects of aging, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and more.3 In this article, we’ll review data that persuaded the FDA to allow metformin to be studied in humans as the first anti-aging drug.1 Broad-Spectrum Effects The most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug is metformin. It has been in use in England since 1958 and in the United States since 1995. Derived from a compound found in the French Lilac, metformin has a track record of safety and effectiveness at routine doses of up to 2,000 mg daily.4-7 So what evidence is there for the FDA to consider this drug as an anti-aging medication? The reason is simple: Metformin can block or diminish many of the fundamental factors that accelerate aging.8-12 These include protecting against DNA damage glycation, poor mitochondrial function, and chronic inflammation. Metformin has been shown to facilitate DNA repair, which is critical for cancer prevention. By attacking these fundamental degenerative processes, metformin can prevent the development of aging’s most troubling diseases. Metformin has also been shown to increase the production of known longevity-promoting signaling molecules in cells, such as mTOR and AMPK—all of which reduce fat and sugar storage and increas Continue reading >>

Metformin And Brain Fog

Metformin And Brain Fog

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Has anyone experienced "brain fog" whilst taking Metformin? By brain fog I mean feeling mildly confused, feeling out of it, not being able to focus, and a general feeling of apathy. My doctor said Metformin can cause low Vitamin B12 levels with long term use (low B12 levels are associated with brain fog), so I got some bloods done. My B12 levels came back in the lower range of normal, but they were still normal. Also got glucose, thyroid and a few other things tested too, all came back normal. I've tried taking a B12 supplement with my Metformin to see if this would make any difference, but unfortunately I'm still getting brain fog. As soon as I stop taking Metformin the brain fog stops. My doctor said this can just be a general side effect of the medication, and does't have any suggestions for how I can improve this. She has checked my cognitive functions and all are normal, so she doesn't think the brain fog is related to anything else. Anyone else suffering from this? Anyone have any suggestions as to what I can do to improve this? Metformin has been helping with weight loss considerably so I want to continue taking it, but this brain fog issue is starting to affect my work and personal relationships, so I'm desperate to try anything that will help. You could experiment with the different types of B12. One of them might work better with your body. I've been taking methylB12 sublingual lozenges and have started adding in some adenoB12 and hydroxyB12. I have issues with brain fog and fatigue and some other is Continue reading >>

Study: Metformin Linked To Higher Risk Of Alzheimer’s And Parkinson’s

Study: Metformin Linked To Higher Risk Of Alzheimer’s And Parkinson’s

A recent study found that the use of metformin in people with diabetes increased their risk for developing dementia and Parkinson’s Disease. This may be surprising as not too long ago, we reported on a different study which found the opposite–that using metformin might lower the risk for dementia in older men. The study from Taiwanese researchers was presented on March 29, 2017 at The 13th International Conference on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases in Vienna Austria by Dr. Yi-Chun Kuan from the Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. The researchers found that long-term use of metformin may raise the risk of neurodegenerative disease in those with type 2 diabetes. How Harmful Might Metformin Be to the Brain? As reported by Medscape Medical News, Yi-Chun Kuan and team conducted a cohort study to follow a total 9,300 patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan for up to 12 years. They checked records for these patients from the National Health research database of Taiwan including 4,651 who had metformin prescriptions and 4651 matched controls who didn’t take any metformin. Dr. Kuan told Medscape they adjusted for age, sex, and diabetes severity and that despite this, “the cumulative incidences of Parkinson’s and dementia were significantly higher for our metformin cohort” at 12 years. In fact, the risk for Parkinson’s disease or Alzheimer’s dementia went up over 50 percent during a 12 year period in those who took metformin when compared to those who did not. Researchers also found that “outcome risks increased progressively with higher dosage and longer duration of treatment.” Dr. Yi-Chun Kuan said, “We’d heard about a possible protective effect from metformin. However, we found the reverse,” and she added t Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications

Oral Diabetes Medications

A list of oral diabetes medications with advantages, disadvantages, and side effects. Click on the name of a drug for more information. Biguanides Glucophage (generic name: metformin) Glucophage XR (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Fortamet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Glumetza (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Riomet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride liquid) What are Biguanides? Metformin is the only member of the biguanides family in use today. Metformin (met-FOR-min) helps lower blood glucose by making sure your liver does not put extra glucose into the system when it is not needed. The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes recommend the inclusion of metformin (along with diet and exercise) in initial diabetes treatment. A good thing about metformin is that it does not cause blood glucose to get too low (hypoglycemia) when it is the only diabetes medicine you take. Who can take this medicine? Adults with type 2 diabetes can take metformin with their doctor’s approval and supervision. You should avoid metformin if you have liver or kidney problems, lung or heart disease, or conditions that cause low blood oxygen levels. Who should not take this medicine? People with certain types of heart problems, such as congestive heart failure, should use caution with this medicine. People with reduced kidney function or kidney disease should probably not take metformin. It should be used with caution if you regularly consume more than two to three drinks daily, so check with your doctor about that. Advantages Metformin, when used alone, is unlikely to cause low blood sugar. It is one of those medicines that always seems to help even after people have had diabetes for a while, and, for this reason Continue reading >>

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