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Does High Carb Diet Cause Diabetes

Low-carb Diets Linked With Type 2 Diabetes

Low-carb Diets Linked With Type 2 Diabetes

Fad diets are clearly not all they are cracked up to be. Most are simply made up of theories that seldom get put to the test other than with the anecdotal evidence of users who swear by them. When put to the test of time, however, they fail those who use them and when carefully scrutinized by scientists and researchers they collapse under the weight of the evidence. Low-Carb diets are the prototype for this. They’ve been around for well over 100 years in one form or another, with the most popular version being marketed by Dr. Atkins over the last 40 years. People do lose weight, but not for the reasons put forth by those who champion such plans. The weight loss comes partly from eating fewer calories and partly because in this day and age, eliminating carbohydrates means eliminating calorie dense, highly processed foods (most of which contain high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)). I can’t imagine why anyone would follow a diet — any diet — that takes entire food groups away from you. There’s no reason to give up great foods like pasta, potatoes, beans and corn to lose weight or to be healthier. Giving up these foods is one of the main reasons that the Atkins diet is not a diet that can be sustained for the long term. Further, such diets seldom prepare people for eating real food: when they go off the diet they usually gain the weight back, and then some. There’s been concern for years about the long term health risks of such diets. We’ve seen that those eating higher protein diets that are also high in saturated fat were more likely to develop heart disease than those whose higher protein diet came from vegetable protein sources. Interestingly, those women eating a strict low-carbohydrate diet weighed more than those eating a more normal diet.(1) Their Body Mas Continue reading >>

Is It True That Eating Too Many Carbohydrates Can Cause Diabetes?

Is It True That Eating Too Many Carbohydrates Can Cause Diabetes?

Is it true that eating too many carbohydrates can cause diabetes? Is it true that eating too many carbohydrates can cause diabetes? Can eating too many carbohydrates increase your chances of developing diabetes? Carbohydrates don't cause diabetes, however eating too many calories overall (from carbohydrates or other types of food) can lead to diabetes in some people. Here's what's going on: Usually when a person eats, her or his blood glucose rises and in response insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas, is released. Insulin helps cells in the body to absorb glucose from the blood to use for energy or store as fat. People with diabetes either don't produce enough insulin, or their bodies don't respond to the insulin, or both. As a result, glucose remains in the blood, depriving the body's cells of energy they need, and causing damage to blood vessels, heart, kidneys, eyes, and feet. The Go Ask Alice! Q&A Diabetes mellitus has more detailed information on the disease, as does the American Diabetes Association website. Diabetes can be brought on by a number of factors, including old age, obesity, lack of exercise, or a genetic predisposition. Eating more calories than you expend, whether they're complex carbohydrates, sugars, fats, or proteins, paired with a lack of exercise and being overweight can increase some people's chances of developing diabetes. This is especially true if there is history of the disease in the family. The good news is that many people with or at-risk for developing diabetes are able to manage their condition through regular exercise and a healthy diet. Getting regular physical activity actually helps the body's cells to properly use insulin. Eating a healthy, balanced diet of fresh whole foods (e.g., grains, veggies, fruits, nuts, legumes) al Continue reading >>

Low-fat, High-carb Diets Reverse Insulin Resistance

Low-fat, High-carb Diets Reverse Insulin Resistance

Low-Fat, High-Carb Diets Reverse Insulin Resistance Editor-at-Large George Lundberg, MD, reviews studies suggesting that the diet advice typically given to patients with diabetes is wrong. by George Lundberg, MD George Lundberg, MD, Editor-at-Large, MedPage Today Hello and welcome. I'm Dr. George Lundberg, speaking for myself and for my co-author Laurie Endicott Thomas, and this is At Large at MedPage Today. Physicians and other healthcare professionals often tell their patients with type 2 diabetes to avoid eating too much starch and sugar in order to keep their blood sugar from going too high. But if the patients follow that advice, they'll end up eating more fat and more protein, which could increase their risk of cardiovascular and renal complications . Worse yet, a high fat intake may actually keep the patients diabetic. It was clear by the early 20th century that diets that include a lot of fat result in impaired glucose tolerance whereas starchy, low-fat diets restore the ability to tolerate glucose . Thus, the low-carbohydrate diet that many patients with type 2 diabetes are told to eat could actually be contributing to their diabetes. A randomized clinical trial published in 2006 showed that a low-fat diet with carbohydrates based entirely on unrefined plant foods providing 75% of calories outperformed the American Diabetes Association's standard dietary recommendations for people with type 2 diabetes. The subjects assigned to the high-carbohydrate diet lost more weight, had better laboratory values (including lower HbA1c and LDL cholesterol), and were more likely to be able to discontinue taking at least one of their prescription medications. They were also more likely to stick to their diet. Although their food choices were restricted (they could eat nothing Continue reading >>

The High-carbohydrate Diet In Diabetes Management.

The High-carbohydrate Diet In Diabetes Management.

The high-carbohydrate diet in diabetes management. In summary, the best diet for an insulin-requiring diabetic person is a diet thatcan be best integrated into the person's lifestyle, one that is best matched toan insulin regimen acceptable to that person, and one that leads to the bestcontrol of the 24-hour integrated blood glucose concentration. Should futureresearch indicate that a very high-CHO, low-fat diet is of additional benefit to the patient, then the dietary recommendations to the patient should be alteredaccordingly. It should be understood that diabetes is a chronic disease thatrequires intensive effort by the patient if reasonable management is to beattained. We should not complicate this management unnecessarily by dietaryintervention unless clear benefits can be observed. For the type II,noninsulin-requiring diabetic person, dietary recommendations are even lesscertain. Obese patients should be encouraged to lose weight and to maintain amore ideal body weight, but one should not be disappointed if the patient isunable to accomplish this. Medical indications for weight loss rarely have beensufficient motivation for patients to remain on a semistarvation diet. Shouldsafe, effective anorexigenic drugs become available, they clearly would be thetreatment of choice for these patients. The best weight-maintenance diet for typeII diabetic persons remains to be determined. A high-CHO, low-fat diet wouldappear to be best, provided it results in a more normal average level of bloodglucose. An increase in dietary soluble fiber also may be useful in reducing the serum cholesterol concentration. In such a diet, those CHO foods that raise thepostprandial glucose concentration the least should be emphasized. Continue reading >>

Very-low-carb Diet Can Safely Curb Blood Sugar In Type 1 Diabetes, Study Suggests

Very-low-carb Diet Can Safely Curb Blood Sugar In Type 1 Diabetes, Study Suggests

More On: carbohydrates , David Ludwig , diabetes , Division of Endocrinology , low-glycemic diet , type 1 diabetes David Ludwig, MD, PhD , an endocrinologist at Boston Childrens Hospital, has written popular books espousing a low-glycemic, low-carbohydrate diet for weight control. He has argued that high-glycemic diets are contributing to the epidemic of type 2 diabetes. But he hadnt given much thought to carbohydrate restriction for type 1 diabetes until 2016. At a conference, Ludwig met a surgeon with type 1 diabetes who maintains normal hemoglobin A1c levels (indicating high blood sugar control) on a very-low-carbohydrate diet.This surprised and impressed him: he had never seen any patient with type 1 diabetes able to completely normalize their hemoglobin A1cs. Moreover, most diabetes experts discourage very-low-carb diets, believing they posea risk for hypoglycemia, or a dangerous drop in blood sugar. The surgeon told Ludwig about TypeOneGrit , a Facebook community of children and adults with type 1 diabetes who follow a very-low-carbohydrate diet espoused by the book Dr. Bernsteins Diabetes Solution. Ludwig decided to conduct an observational study of this community, together with Boston Childrens endocrinologist Belinda Lennerz, MD, PhD . Book author Richard Bernstein, MD, is a co-author. Ludwig and Lennerz analyzed survey responses from 316 community members. For 138 members, they were able to corroborate survey responses with health care providers or through a review of medical records. Its time to refocus on the medicinal power of diet, says Ludwig. As reported today in Pediatrics , self-reported hemoglobin A1c values averaged in the normal range, at 5.67 percent. (The target is below 7 percent; prevailing levels average 8.2 percent.) Some survey respondents e Continue reading >>

Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did The Film What The Health Get Itright?

Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did The Film What The Health Get Itright?

Professor of Cardiology, Summa cum Laude grad, Kahn Center for Longevity and GreenSpace Cafe. www.drjoelkahn.com @drjkahn. Author The Plant Based Solution NEW Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did the Film What the Health Get itRight? The documentary What the Health is receiving a huge amount of attention and most of it is positive. Many reports of people attempting to eat better are filling social media. I discussed the film on a local TV station in Detroit after two reporters indicated that the movie had made a big impact on their diets. There have even been reports that restaurants serving healthier fare have seen an uptick in customers attributing the change to the film. I have seen this in my own plant-based restaurant and have a What The Health Happy Hour that has been very popular. Naturally, there have been critics of the movie defending their viewpoint that meat based diets are healthy, but most have rallied around a statement in the film by Neal Barnard, MD that sugar does not cause diabetes. As the answer to this question may be important to you, I have done some research and share it here but this is in NO way an endorsement to add back soda and candy bars to your diet. In a world stressed by growing obesity and its medical consequences, limiting sugar is a universal recommendation from all health experts. 1) Type 1 diabetes is not caused by sugar. All agree on this as type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease leading to destruction of the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. However, patients with type 1 diabetes can develop and reverse insulin resistance (IR) in their muscles and liver so understanding the origin of IR is important. 2) Who is Neal Barnard, MD? Dr. Barnard is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and Continue reading >>

My High-carb, Low-fat Experiment With Type 1 Diabetes

My High-carb, Low-fat Experiment With Type 1 Diabetes

My High-Carb, Low-Fat Experiment with Type 1 Diabetes This is a detailed article about what happened when I tried to experiment with a low-fat, high-carb diet lead by Cyrus Khambatta from Mastering Diabetes for ultimate sensitivity to insulin. This is a lengthy post because I want to do the experience justice. I also want to give enough detail to give proper credit and acknowledgment to those who do enjoy and thrive while eating a high-carb, low-fat, plant-based diet. But by Day 9 of this experiment, Ive realized Im not one of those people. My usual over the past few years has varied between a low-carb diet (50 grams or less of carbs) or a lower-than-average carb diet (100 grams or less). And sprinkled in there are also indulgences like gluten-free pizza or the incredible gluten-free chocolate cake I made for my twin brother when he came to visit or gluten-free Christmas cookies. (Yup, diabetics can eat cookies! ) My point is: I save my carbs for the good stuff: pizza night, burger night, and occasional homemade desserts. Pizza night is probably 3x a month. Burger night is far more rare, 1x a month at most. Ive managed to keep my A1C between 5.5 and 6.5 with this flexible approach to eating mostly whole foods, mostly low-carb, and saving room in my carb budget for the carbs that I enjoy the most. This also makes blood sugar management around those treats easier because your low-carb choices all day required very little effort and insulin/carb juggling. You can also keep your carb intake still relatively low if youre just indulging once per day (or once per week, etc., your choice), so youre preventing any feeling of deprivation but still eating a mostly lower carb diet. I was also a big fan of intermittent fasting prior to this experiment, and I continued to do 16-hour Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Carbohydrates And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Carbohydrates are our main source of energy and provide important nutrients for good health and a healthy, balanced diet. All the carbohydrates you eat and drink are broken down into glucose. The type, and amount, you consume can make a difference to your blood glucose levels and diabetes management. The two main types of carbohydrates Starchy foods: these include bread, pasta, potatoes, yams, breakfast cereals and couscous. Sugars: these can be divided into naturally occurring and added sugars: Naturally occurring: sugars found in fruits (fructose) and some dairy foods (lactose). Added sugars: found in sweets, chocolate, sugary drinks and desserts. Fibre This is another type of carbohydrate, which you can’t digest. Insoluble fibre, such as is found in wholemeal bread, brown rice and wholegrain cereals, helps keep the digestive system healthy. Soluble fibre, such as bananas, apples, carrots, potatoes, oats and barley, helps to keep your blood glucose and cholesterol under control. Make sure you eat both types of fibre regularly. Good sources of fibre include fruit and veg, nuts and seeds, oats, wholegrain breads and pulses. How much? Everyone needs some carbohydrate every day. The actual amount that you need to eat will depend on your age, activity levels and the goals you – and your family – are trying to achieve, for example trying to lose weight, improve blood glucose levels or improve sports performance. The total amount of carbohydrate eaten will have the biggest effect on your glucose levels. Insulin and carb counting If you’re living with diabetes, and take insulin, you’ll need to take that into account when eating carbs. Learn about which foods contain carbohydrates, how to estimate carbohydrate portions and how to monitor their effect on blood glucose Continue reading >>

Are Excess Carbohydrates The Main Link To Diabetes & Its Complications In Asians?

Are Excess Carbohydrates The Main Link To Diabetes & Its Complications In Asians?

Indian J Med Res. 2018 Nov;148(5):531-538. doi: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1698_18. Are excess carbohydrates the main link to diabetes & its complications in Asians? Department of Diabetology, Dr Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre & Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Chennai, India. Department of Foods Nutrition & Dietetics Research, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Chennai, India. Dietary carbohydrates form the major source of energy in Asian diets. The carbohydrate quantity and quality play a vital function in the prevention and management of diabetes. High glycaemic index foods elicit higher glycaemic and insulinaemic responses and promote insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) through beta-cell exhaustion. This article reviews the evidence associating dietary carbohydrates to the prevalence and incidence of T2D and metabolic syndrome (MS) in control of diabetes and their role in the complications of diabetes. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies show that higher carbohydrate diets are linked to higher prevalence and incidence of T2D. However, the association seems to be stronger in Asian-Indians consuming diets high in carbohydrates and more marked on a background of obesity. There is also evidence for high carbohydrate diets and risk for MS and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the quality of carbohydrates is also equally important. Complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat bread, legumes, pulses and green leafy vegetables are good carbs. Conversely, highly polished rice or refined wheat, sugar, glucose, highly processed foods such as cookies and pastries, fruit juice and sweetened beverages and fried potatoes or French fries are obviously 'bad' carbs. Ultimately, it is all a matter of balance and moderation in diet. For Indians who curre Continue reading >>

Keto Diet And Diabetes Risk

Keto Diet And Diabetes Risk

Researchers Find Evidence Keto Diet May Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk Written by Kristen Fischer on August 16, 2018 A new mouse study finds potential risk of taking up the popular diet. Though many people claim the keto diet to be a game changer or a lifesaver, a newly released study raises questions about its ability to cause type 2 diabetes. The study, which was conducted on mice, evaluated the keto diet . The keto diet is a low-carb, high-fat diet plan that causes the body to burn fat instead of carbohydrates a process known as ketosis. This is said to help with weight loss. The Journal of Physiology published the research, which said following the diet in its early phases could boost the risk for type 2 diabetes. ETH Zurich along with the University Childrens Hospital Zurich conducted the study. They fed mice ketogenic diets and high-fat diets and then tested their metabolisms and sugar responses. They found that keto diets dont allow the body to properly use insulin, so blood sugar isnt properly controlled. That leads to insulin resistance , which can raise the risk for type 2 diabetes. The researchers say they didnt evaluate if the diet causes obesity after long-term use. They called for additional research to better understand how keto diets affect the body. Researchers want to look at the mechanism behind the effects. Although ketogenic diets are known to be healthy, our findings indicate that there may be an increased risk of insulin resistance with this type of diet that may lead to type 2 diabetes, said Christian Wolfrum, PhD, a professor at ETH Zurich and co-author of the research. Gerald Grandl, PhD, co-author of the study and professor at the German Research Center for Environmental Health , said that insulin resistance and the keto diet have been studied Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Diabetes

Carbohydrates And Diabetes

en espaolLos carbohidratos y la diabetes Keeping your blood sugar levels on track means watching what you eat, plus taking medicines like insulin if you need to. Your doctor may also have mentioned that you should keep track of how many carbohydrates (carbs) you eat. But what exactly are carbohydrates and how do they affect your blood sugar? The foods we eat contain nutrients that provide energy and other things the body needs, and one of these is carbohydrates . The two main forms of carbohydrates are: sugars such as fructose, glucose, and lactose starches, which are found in foods such as starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), grains, rice, breads, and cereals The body breaks down or converts most carbohydrates into the sugar glucose . Glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream, and with the help of a hormone called insulin it travels into the cells of the body where it can be used for energy. People with diabetes have problems with insulin that can cause blood sugar levels to rise. For people with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas loses the ability to make insulin. For people with type 2 diabetes, the body can't respond normally to the insulin that is made. Because the body turns carbohydrates into glucose, eating carbohydrates makes blood sugar levels rise. But that doesn't mean you should avoid carbohydrates if you have diabetes. Carbohydrates are a healthy and important part of a nutritious diet. Some carbohydrates have more health benefits than others, though. For example, whole-grain foods and fruits are healthier choices than candy and soda because they provide fiber, vitamins, and other nutrients. Fiber is important because it helps you feel full and keeps your digestive system working properly. In fact, eating lots of fiber can even help to slow the body's ab Continue reading >>

Why I Recommend A High-carb Diet For My Patients With Diabetes

Why I Recommend A High-carb Diet For My Patients With Diabetes

Why I Recommend a High-Carb Diet for My Patients with Diabetes Michelle McMacken, MD, is a board-certified internal medicine physician and an assistant professor of medicine at NYU School of Medicine. An honors graduate of Yale University and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, she has more than ten years of experience practicing primary care,directing a medical weight-loss program, and teaching doctors-in-training at Bellevue Hospital Center in NYC. An enthusiastic supporter of plant-based nutrition, she is committed to educating patients, medical students, and doctors about the power of healthy eating and lifestyle modification. From a Failing Heart and Weight Struggles to Healthy and Active: A Couples Plant-Based Journey I have many patients with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes in my internal medicine practice. When I ask what foods they think they should limit, the majority answer carbs. To their surprise, I tell them that I actually recommend a high-carb dietone based in whole- or minimally processed plant foods. Heres why: People eating high-carb, high-fiber diets enjoy exceptional protection from type 2 diabetes. The Adventist Health Study 2 showed that among nearly 61,000 people, veganswhose diets are typically high in carbohydrate-rich foodshad half the rate of diabetes compared to non-vegetarians, even after accounting for differences in body weight. It is notable that the non-vegetarians in this study ate red meat and poultry relatively infrequently, suggesting that even small increases in meat consumption disproportionately increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Other studies from the Adventist group show similar trends. Among 41,387 Adventists followed for two years, vegans had a 62 percent lower risk of developing diabetes compared to o Continue reading >>

Low Carb Or High Carb?

Low Carb Or High Carb?

It seems like a pretty simple question, but alas, it is not.  The American Diabetes Association (ADA) admits that low carbohydrate diets would help patients manage their blood sugars, but the organization still recommends a high carbohydrate dietary approach.  Why? According to Regina Wilshire, science writer, the ADA feels that low carb diets are too difficult for people to follow.  This is obvious if you pick up any diabetes publication off the supermarket shelf.  Most of them have a picture of a chocolate cake or plate of cookies right on the front cover.  The over-riding position is that patients can’t or won’t do it, so we shouldn’t deprive them unnecessarily.  There are new drugs and medications approved and many more in the pipeline to control blood sugar, so why ask people to give up their favorite foods?  This type of thinking, of course, is dangerous and narrow-minded.    And, it’s led us to the position of having a run away train destroying the health of our country and the developed world.  Diabetes is beyond epidemic already, and it’s predicted to triple in the next 35 years.  Other so-called experts tell patients that low carb diets can even be dangerous.  That if they don’t get enough carbs, their brain will starve, that it will put them in a state of keto-acidosis, or that too much protein will destroy their kidneys.  None of this is true.  “Carbohydrates, whether derived from gluten-containing foods or other sources, including fruit, sweetened beverages, and starchy vegetables, are dangerous as they relate to brain health in and of themselves” – David Perlmutter The Nurses Health Study, a large study conducted using over 1600 nurses found that a high protein diet was not dangerous or harmful in women with normal kidney f Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

Diabetes Overview - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

Diabetes Overview - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

If your deductible reset on January 1, there are new programs to help you afford your insulin prescription| Learn more The path to understanding diabetes starts here. No matter where you are in your fight, heres where you need to be. Whether youve been newly diagnosed, have been fighting against type 1 or type 2 diabetes for a while, or are helping a loved one, youve come to the right place. This is the start of gaining a deeper understanding of how you can live a healthier lifewith all the tools, health tips, and food ideas you need. Wherever youre at with this disease, know that you have options and that you dont have to be held back. You can still live your best life. All you have to do is take action and stick with it. Heres what you need to know about type 1 diabetes. 1.25 million Americans have it and 40,000 people will be diagnosed with it this year. Type 1 diabetes occurs at every age, in people of every race, and of every shape and size. There is no shame in having it, and you have a community of people ready to support you. Learning as much as you can about it and working closely with your diabetes care team can give you everything you need to thrive. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The body breaks down the carbohydrates you eat into blood sugarthat it uses for energyand insulin is a hormone that the body needs to get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, everyone can learn to manage their condition and live long healthy lives. Remember: this is a condition that can be managed. By living a healthy lifestyle filled with exercise and proper diet, you can live a normal life and do everything you set out to do. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetesand it Continue reading >>

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