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Does High Blood Sugar Make You Sleepy

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tweet Many people with diabetes will describe themselves as feeling tired, lethargic or fatigued at times. It could be a result of stress, hard work or a lack of a decent night’s sleep but it could also be related to having too high or too low blood glucose levels. Tiredness as a symptom of diabetes Regular tiredness, particularly tiredness following meals, is a common symptom of diabetes. Read more on the symptoms of diabetes What causes people with diabetes to be tired? Two common reasons for tiredness or lethargy are having too high or too low blood sugar levels. In both cases, the tiredness is the result of having an imbalance between one’s level of blood glucose and the amount or effectiveness of circulating insulin. If you feel tired during the day, despite having slept well, it could be a result of either high or low sugar levels. It is best to test your blood glucose levels to see whether the tiredness is indeed a result of having high or low sugar levels. This is particularly important for people on insulin. Read about the recommended blood glucose levels ranges Tiredness and high blood sugar levels Blood glucose levels go high when there is either insufficient insulin (typically in the case of type 1 diabetes) or the insulin is not working effectively enough (typically in type 2 diabetes). To provide us with energy, insulin is needed to transport glucose from blood into our cells to be used for energy. When there is not enough insulin, or the insulin isn’t working effectively, it means the sugar in our blood cannot get into our cells and therefore our cells do not receive the energy they need. As a result, we feel tired. Managing tiredness and high blood sugar after meals If tiredness is accompanied by high blood glucose levels after meals, it can indica Continue reading >>

What Does It Mean To Have High Blood Sugar?

What Does It Mean To Have High Blood Sugar?

What is hyperglycemia? Have you ever felt like no matter how much water or juice you drink, it just isn’t enough? Does it seem like you spend more time running to the restroom than not? Are you frequently tired? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may have high blood sugar. High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, primarily affects people who have diabetes. It occurs when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin. It can also happen when your body is unable to absorb insulin properly or develops a resistance to insulin entirely. Hyperglycemia can also affect people who don’t have diabetes. Your blood sugar levels can spike when you’re ill or under stress. This occurs when the hormones that your body produces to fight off illness raise your blood sugar. If your blood sugar levels are consistently high and left untreated, it can lead to serious complications. These complications can involve problems with your vision, nerves, and cardiovascular system. You generally won’t experience any symptoms until your blood sugar levels are significantly elevated. These symptoms can develop over time, so you may not realize that something is wrong at first. Early symptoms can include: increased urinary frequency increased thirst blurred vision headaches fatigue The longer the condition remains untreated, the more serious symptoms can become. If left untreated, toxic acids can build up in your blood or urine. More serious signs and symptoms include: vomiting nausea dry mouth shortness of breath abdominal pain Your diet may cause you to have high blood sugar levels, particularly if you have diabetes. Carbohydrate-heavy foods such as breads, rice, and pasta can raise your blood sugar. Your body breaks these foods down into sugar molecules during digestion. One of these Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Introduction High blood sugar in diabetes occurs when the sugar (glucose) level in the blood rises above normal. It is also called hyperglycemia. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar may be caused by not getting enough insulin or missing your diabetes medicine. It may also be caused by eating too much food, skipping exercise, or being ill or stressed. Unlike low blood sugar, high blood sugar usually happens slowly over hours or days. Blood sugar levels above your target range may make you feel tired and thirsty. If your blood sugar keeps rising, your kidneys will make more urine and you can get dehydrated. Signs of dehydration include being thirstier than usual and having darker urine than usual. Without treatment, severe dehydration can be life-threatening. Over time, high blood sugar can damage the eyes, heart, kidneys, blood vessels, and nerves. Watch for symptoms of high blood sugar. Symptoms include feeling very tired or thirsty and urinating more often than usual. As long as you notice the symptoms, you will probably have time to treat high blood sugar so that you can prevent an emergency. Three things can help you prevent high blood sugar problems: Test your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or not following your normal routine. Testing lets you see when your blood sugar is above your target range, even if you don't have symptoms. Then you can treat it early. Call your doctor if you often have high blood sugar or your blood sugar is often above your target range. Your medicine may need to be adjusted or changed. Drink extra water or drinks that don't have caffeine or sugar to prevent dehydration. How do you prevent high blood sugar emergencies? Treat infections early Infections that aren't treated (such as urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

November is National Diabetes Month and Alaska Sleep Clinic is dedicating this month’s blog posts to raising awareness for diabetic complications and how they correlate with sleep disorders and overall tiredness. SLEEP PROBLEMS AND SNORING MAY PREDICT DIABETES Studies have shown that individuals who consistently have a bad night's sleep are more likely to develop conditions linked to diabetes and heart disease. Loud snoring sleepers (many of whom may have sleep apnea), compared to quiet sleepers, double (2x) their risks of developing certain types of metabolic syndrome(s); including diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure. This likelihood also increased dramatically to 80% in those who found it difficult to fall asleep and to 70% for those who woke up feeling not as refreshed. Blood Sugar and Sleep Problems Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels, and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep. It’s a vicious cycle. As the amount of sleep decreases, blood sugar increases, escalating the issue. Lack of sleep has been shown to increase blood sugar levels and the risk of diabetic issues. Higher blood sugar means less long-lasting fat metabolism in the night and even less sleep. Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine found that people who slept less than 6 hours a night had more blood sugar complications compared to those who received 8 hours of sleep. HIGH BLOOD SUGAR - HYPERGLYCEMIA Sleepless and restless nights hurt more than your mood and energy; it is a form of chronic stress on the body. When there is added stress on your body this results in having higher blood sugar levels. When researchers restricted people with type-1 diabetes to just 4 hours of sleep, their sensitivity to insulin was reduced by 20% compared to that after a full nig Continue reading >>

Why Does High (or Low) Blood Sugar Give Me Headaches?

Why Does High (or Low) Blood Sugar Give Me Headaches?

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. Headaches can be debilitating, and patients with diabetes can get headaches from blood sugars dropping too low or climbing too high. As if we didn’t have enough to think about, right? There are many factors that can trigger headaches or even migraines, and blood sugar fluctuations are just one of those factors. The key to avoiding blood sugar-related headaches is keeping blood sugars from spiking or dropping too rapidly. For example, when you are treating a low blood sugar, don’t go on a high carbohydrate-eating binge, even though you may be ravenous. Eat a sensible meal with some protein as directed by your healthcare provider. When blood sugar is too low One of the suspected causes of low blood sugar-caused headaches has to do with the blood vessels in your brain. Your brain needs a readily available supply of glucose in order to function properly. If the brain senses it does not have enough sugar, blood vessels in the brain can spasm, triggering a headache. In the fasting state, stress hormones are also released which can cause vasoconstriction leading to headache. There is also a type of headache that can be seen in patients with diabetes that experience frequent low blood sugars, which are followed by rebound high blood sugars. This rebound phenomenon is often due to hormones that the body releases in response to a low blood sugar in an attempt to regulate itself. When blood sugar is too high High blood sugars can cause l Continue reading >>

When Your Blood Sugar Is Too High Or Too Low

When Your Blood Sugar Is Too High Or Too Low

Sometimes, no matter how hard you try to keep your blood sugar in the range your doctor has advised, it can be too high or too low. Blood sugar that is too high or too low can make you very sick. Here's how to handle these emergencies. What You Need to Know about High Blood Sugar If your blood sugar stays over 240, it is too high. High blood sugar usually comes on slowly. It happens when you don't have enough insulin in your body. High blood sugar can happen if you miss taking your diabetes medicine, eat too much, or don't get enough exercise. Sometimes, medicines you take for other problems may cause high blood sugar. Be sure to tell your doctor about other medicines you take. This chart shows the ranges of blood sugar. Having an infection or being sick or under stress can also make your blood sugar too high. That is why it is very important to test your blood and keep taking your medicine (insulin or diabetes pills) when you have an infection or are sick. Your blood sugar may be too high if you are very thirsty and tired, have blurry vision, are losing weight fast, and have to go to the bathroom often. Very high blood sugar may make you feel sick to your stomach, faint, or throw up. It can cause you to lose too much fluid from your body. Testing your blood sugar often, especially when you are sick, will warn you that your blood sugar may be rising too high. If your blood sugar stays over 300 when you check it two times in a row, call your doctor. You may need a change in your insulin shots or diabetes pills, or a change in your meal plan. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and sa Continue reading >>

Why Diabetics Get Sleepy After Meals

Why Diabetics Get Sleepy After Meals

A healthy meal should leave you feeling energized and ready to accomplish your daily activities. However, if you feel sleepy after a meal or find yourself taking a nap on the couch after eating, it may be because of your diabetes. You will need to do a bit of experimentation to find out the cause of your sleepiness, but it is possible to correct this simple problem. Video of the Day For many people with diabetes, eating too much, and especially eating too much carbohydrates and sugar, makes them feel very tired after the meal. Feeling tired and lack of energy are common symptoms of hyperglycemia, or high-blood sugar levels. You may have a lot of sugar circulating through your bloodstream, but your insulin is either deficient or inefficient at getting that sugar into your cells. If your cells are not getting sugar, which is their main source of energy, they feel tired and so do you. Hyperglycemia also may be, but is not always, accompanied by increased thirst and frequent urination. Hypoglycemia, or low-blood sugar levels, may be the cause of your sleepiness after eating. Hypoglycemia can happen if you have taken too much insulin or diabetes medications for the amount of carbohydrates you ate or if you had quickly digestible carbohydrates that made your blood sugar levels peak high and then crash within one to two hours. If your blood sugar levels drop below 70 mg/dL, it is considered a low-blood sugar level and you need to treat it immediately with either three to four glucose tablets, 1/2 cup of a regular soft drink, 1/2 cup of fruit juice or 1 tbsp. of sugar or honey. If you experience low-blood sugar, you also may feel hungry, shaky, dizzy, weak, confused and irritable. Blood Sugar Target With diabetes, it is important to adjust your treatment plan, which includes yo Continue reading >>

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar

www.CardioSmart.org Hyperglycemia means your blood sugar is too high. It can happen if you miss your diabetes medicine, do not eat healthy foods, or do not exercise. Illness, stress, and hormones can also cause your blood sugar to rise. In some people, it occurs for no apparent reason. If you have type 2 diabetes, it may take days for your blood sugar to rise too high. With type 1 diabetes, it may happen faster. By checking your blood sugar, youmay be able to prevent this and avoid an emergency. Signs of high blood sugar You may havemild high blood sugar if you: • Feel very thirsty and urinate more. • Have warm, dry skin. You may havemoderate high blood sugar if you: • Breathe fast and deeply. • Have a fruity breath odor. • Have belly pain, poor appetite, or vomiting. • Are dizzy or weak. • Urinate less. • Have blurred vision that slowly gets worse. • Feel drowsy and have trouble waking up. You may have severe high blood sugar if you: • Have a rapid heart rate and a weak pulse. • Have rapid, deep breathing with a strong, fruity breath odor. • Feel very sleepy and weak. • Fainted or passed out. How to prevent high blood sugar • Post a list of symptoms where you can see it often. Make sure others know the symptoms and what to do in case of an emergency. • Check your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or are not doing your normal routine. • Teach others at work and at home how to check your blood sugar. • Have a medical alert bracelet or other medical identification with you at all times. • Develop a plan. Talk with your doctor about howmuch insulin to take, depending on your blood sugar level. • Take your medicines as prescribed. Do not skip your di Continue reading >>

Is This Why You’re Tired All The Time?

Is This Why You’re Tired All The Time?

If you have diabetes and you’re tired all the time, don’t just chalk the fatigue up to your fluctuating blood sugar. Turns out that the emotional toll of dealing with diabetes can be what’s behind your fatigue, according to a new study published in The Diabetes Educator. And you don’t have to just take it. Researchers from the University of Illinois College of Nursing measured the blood sugar levels of 83 diabetic women over the age of 40, and also asked them general questions about their health. Instead of shifting blood sugar levels being linked with fatigue—as is often assumed by doctors—other factors, like depression and BMI, were shown to be greater indicators of whether women felt constantly tired. "People have always assumed blood sugar is the cause of fatigue," says lead study author Cynthia Fritschi, RN, PhD. "It really isn't. Stress, depression, sleep—all of these play a bigger factor in fatigue than blood sugar or blood glucose.” Here’s the problem: Being tired makes you less likely to do what you need to do to keep your diabetes in check, like exercising and eating healthy meals. And doctors don’t typically pick up on these lifestyle issues. "People want to know why they're lacking that get-up-and-go, but doctors don't ask how are you feeling? how are you sleeping? how is your daytime activity?” says Fritschi. Here’s how to make sure your fatigue is being addressed: Be specific. When discussing symptoms with your doctor, state the outcome as well, says Fritschi: Because I'm tired, I'm not able to do x, y and z. "It helps your doctor see that your fatigue is not just a symptom; it's keeping you from taking care of yourself." Take your own health inventory. "Think of the things you can control," says Fritschi. "What's your diet and leve Continue reading >>

Does High Blood Sugar Make You Sleepy?

Does High Blood Sugar Make You Sleepy?

Surprisingly, one of the symptoms of diabetes or pre-diabetes is excessive sleepiness. But the cause of it is probably different than you’d guess. You’d think that a high blood sugar would create a “sugar rush”, which would give you a boost of energy. Right?… That is true initially – especially if you’re healthy and you don’t have insulin problems. But if you aren’t, then things are different for you. What Causes High Blood Sugar? A high blood sugar emerges when there isn’t enough insulin to manage it, or when the insulin is not effective enough because your body is “insensitive” to insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by your pancreas and it’s needed to transport glucose and sugar from the blood to all the cells in your body. When cells receive the correct amount of sugar, they create energy. Why You Feel Tired When you feel tired, it’s because you either don’t have enough energy (glucose) reaching your cells because your body is no longer secreting the proper amount in insulin … or your body is just “insensitive” to the insulin and just doesn’t recognize or feel it. Does this make sense?… If your pancreas is unable to produce a sufficient amount of insulin, or if you are not reacting properly to insulin, your cells won’t receive the right amount of glucose that they need to produce energy. The result is that you feel tired all the time, you become forgetful, you can’t think clearly and many people become moody. So… no sugar rush, but the exact opposite and many times, a “sugar crash”. What About High Blood Sugar There are even more factors that can make you feel tired when you have high blood sugar from eating the wrong TYPE or AMOUNT of foods. When your blood sugar goes too high, your kidneys are working overtime to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fatigue — Get Your Energy Back

Diabetes Fatigue — Get Your Energy Back

Fatigue is one of the most common and most disabling symptoms of diabetes. What causes all this exhaustion and how can we get our energy back? Some studies have reported that as many as 85% of people with diabetes experience fatigue, defined as excessive tiredness that interferes with one or more life functions. As a Diabetes Self-Management reader named Donnah wrote, “Since being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, my housework suffers dramatically, I don’t do half of the things that I used to do with my child. When I do find the time and energy to do things, I am easily worn out and need to rest. I can’t even keep a job. I am on disability because of it and I hate this.” Causes of fatigue How does diabetes make you tired? • High blood sugar makes blood sticky, so it can’t get through the capillaries as easily to bring oxygen to cells. You know how you get sleepy after a big meal? High blood sugar can mean having that feeling all the time. • Insulin resistance keeps glucose out of body cells, so they don’t have fuel. • High blood sugar also causes inflammation. Remember how exhausted you get with the flu? That is, in part, inflammation. The same thing happens with poorly controlled diabetes. • Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can cause fatigue. • The mental stress of coping with diabetes can wear out your mind and spirit. Many other conditions besides diabetes can cause fatigue. If your sugars are under control, but you still lack energy, consider being tested for: • Sleep apnea, which causes exhaustion and is very common in diabetes. If you wake up tired, ask your doctor for a sleep test. • Anemia, or a lack of red blood cells or hemoglobin (the protein responsible for transporting oxygen) in the blood. • Low or high thyroid. • Low sex hormo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar May Cause Noticeable Symptoms

High Blood Sugar May Cause Noticeable Symptoms

High Blood Sugar May Cause Noticeable Symptoms December 7, 2012 Dear Mayo Clinic: What are the most common symptoms of diabetes? Is it true that changes in my eyesight could mean I'm developing diabetes? Answer: People who have diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. Although you can't know your level of blood sugar without a blood test, high blood sugar may cause symptoms that are noticeable. The most common symptoms of diabetes are frequently feeling thirsty, urinating often, losing weight, feeling tired and having sores that heal slowly. Blurred vision or a change in eyesight also can be symptoms of diabetes. People who develop diabetes have a problem with a hormone called insulin. Insulin is made in the pancreas — a gland located just behind the stomach. When you eat, the pancreas releases insulin into your bloodstream. The insulin allows sugar to enter your cells, lowering the amount of sugar in your blood. If you have diabetes, that process doesn't happen normally. There are two kinds of diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make any insulin. If you have type 2 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin or your body cannot use insulin as well as it should. With both types, sugar cannot move into your cells. Instead, it builds up in your blood. As blood sugar rises, it can cause a variety of problems in many areas of the body. Too much sugar in your bloodstream pulls fluid from your body's tissues. That can cause you to become thirsty more often than normal. As a result, you may drink and urinate more than usual. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs don't have the energy they need. That can make you feel hungry and tired. But even though you eat more, you still may lose weight. That's b Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) (cont.) If hyperglycemia persists for at least two or three days, or if ketones appear in the urine, call a doctor. Generally, people with diabetes should test their blood sugar levels at least four times a day: before meals and at bedtime (or following the schedule advised by the prescribed individual diabetes care plan). The urine should be checked for ketones any time the blood sugar level is over 250 mg/dL. When blood sugar stays high despite following a diabetic diet and plan of care, call the nurse, diabetes health educator, or physician for adjustments in the diet. If blood sugars are high because of illness, check for ketones and contact a health professional. Vomiting Confusion Sleepiness Shortness of breath Dehydration Blood sugar levels that stay above 160 mg/dL for longer than a week Glucose readings higher than 300 mg/dL The presence of ketones in the urine Ketoacidosis or diabetic coma is a medical emergency. Call 911 for emergency transport to a hospital or similar emergency center. Please ask your health care professional about the following: How to recognize high blood sugar levels How to treat a high blood sugar level when it occurs in you, a family member, or coworkers How to prevent the blood sugar level from becoming too high How to contact the medical staff during an emergency What emergency supplies to carry to treat high blood sugar Additional educational materials regarding high blood sugar Check blood sugar levels with a blood glucose meter. If blood sugar level is higher than normal, but there are no symptoms, continue routine care such as: Take all diabetes medications on schedule. Eat regular meals. Drink sugar-free and caffeine-free liquids. Take a blood sugar reading every four hours (write it down) u Continue reading >>

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