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Does High Blood Sugar Make You Sleepy

Histamine Affects Blood Sugar & Why Eating Makes You Sleepy

Histamine Affects Blood Sugar & Why Eating Makes You Sleepy

Feeling tired and dizzy after eating, as well as having low blood sugar symptoms between meals, is all too common in histamine intolerance and mast cell activation. Histamine inflammation is a key player in all these, and yet there’s more to it than meets the eye. histamine and blood sugar Histamine and blood sugar are very strongly linked. Blood sugar fluctuations can affect histamine levels, and histamine can contribute to the development of diabetes. Medical studies show that: Diabetic animals were found to consistently have lower levels of the histamine degrading diamine oxidase (DAO) enzyme In animal studies, blocking the histamine 3 receptor (H3) reduced glucose levels in diabetic subjects Diabetics have been found to have increased histamine levels and mast cells Mast cell stabilisers and antihistamines have been shown to decrease diabetic complications TOXIC HUNGER New York Times bestselling author Dr. Fuhrman, M.D., believes that “food addicts and unhealthy eaters feel the detoxification symptoms (as fatigue) after digestion is finished, so they look to eat again for energy (which halts the detoxification, so they feel better) even though they don’t need the calories. This inevitably leads to being overweight and unhealthy.” This tripped me up for years! I suspected blood sugar problems for the longest time and while living in Cairo, Egypt, I’d keep running to the pharmacy next door every time I felt a blood sugar episode coming on, only to be disappointed with totally normal results. I came to realise only years later that what was actually happening was a blood pressure crash, combined with the junk that I had eaten being worked on by my immune system. Now I’ve also come to believe that the symptoms I felt after eating were actually the result of Continue reading >>

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tweet Many people with diabetes will describe themselves as feeling tired, lethargic or fatigued at times. It could be a result of stress, hard work or a lack of a decent night’s sleep but it could also be related to having too high or too low blood glucose levels. Tiredness as a symptom of diabetes Regular tiredness, particularly tiredness following meals, is a common symptom of diabetes. Read more on the symptoms of diabetes What causes people with diabetes to be tired? Two common reasons for tiredness or lethargy are having too high or too low blood sugar levels. In both cases, the tiredness is the result of having an imbalance between one’s level of blood glucose and the amount or effectiveness of circulating insulin. If you feel tired during the day, despite having slept well, it could be a result of either high or low sugar levels. It is best to test your blood glucose levels to see whether the tiredness is indeed a result of having high or low sugar levels. This is particularly important for people on insulin. Read about the recommended blood glucose levels ranges Tiredness and high blood sugar levels Blood glucose levels go high when there is either insufficient insulin (typically in the case of type 1 diabetes) or the insulin is not working effectively enough (typically in type 2 diabetes). To provide us with energy, insulin is needed to transport glucose from blood into our cells to be used for energy. When there is not enough insulin, or the insulin isn’t working effectively, it means the sugar in our blood cannot get into our cells and therefore our cells do not receive the energy they need. As a result, we feel tired. Managing tiredness and high blood sugar after meals If tiredness is accompanied by high blood glucose levels after meals, it can indica Continue reading >>

8 Signs You Might Have High Blood Sugar

8 Signs You Might Have High Blood Sugar

You’ve heard people complain about having low blood sugar before and may have even experienced it yourself. But high blood sugar is also an issue that can a) make you feel like crap and b) cause serious health issues if it happens too often. First, a primer: High blood sugar occurs when the level of glucose (i.e. sugar) in your blood becomes elevated. We get our glucose from food, and most foods we eat impact our blood sugar in one way or another, certified dietitian-nutritionist Lisa Moskovitz, R.D., CEO of NY Nutrition Group, tells SELF. “However, foods that are higher in carbohydrates and sugar, yet lower in fat and fiber, such as baked goods, white-flour breads, soda, and candy usually have a bigger impact on blood sugar levels,” she says. In the short-term, they cause sudden rises in blood sugar (i.e. high blood sugar), which can immediately give you a jolt of energy but will inevitably be followed up by a crash. These foods are also usually not great for you, Moskovitz points out, and can cause excess weight gain, high cholesterol, and bodily inflammation. Having high blood sugar here and there happens, and it will basically just make you feel off. You’ll feel worn-out, headachy, all-around tired, cranky, and may have difficulty concentrating, Jessica Cording, a New York-based R.D., tells SELF. But the major problem lies in having chronically high blood sugar, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, a condition in which your body can’t properly regulate blood sugar. If you get chronic high blood sugar, you’ll also often experience the need to pee frequently, increased thirst, and even have blurred vision, Alissa Rumsey, M.S., R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF. But if you’re not suffering from chronic high blood su Continue reading >>

Does High Blood Sugar Make You Sleepy?

Does High Blood Sugar Make You Sleepy?

Surprisingly, one of the symptoms of diabetes or pre-diabetes is excessive sleepiness. But the cause of it is probably different than you’d guess. You’d think that a high blood sugar would create a “sugar rush”, which would give you a boost of energy. Right?… That is true initially – especially if you’re healthy and you don’t have insulin problems. But if you aren’t, then things are different for you. What Causes High Blood Sugar? A high blood sugar emerges when there isn’t enough insulin to manage it, or when the insulin is not effective enough because your body is “insensitive” to insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by your pancreas and it’s needed to transport glucose and sugar from the blood to all the cells in your body. When cells receive the correct amount of sugar, they create energy. Why You Feel Tired When you feel tired, it’s because you either don’t have enough energy (glucose) reaching your cells because your body is no longer secreting the proper amount in insulin … or your body is just “insensitive” to the insulin and just doesn’t recognize or feel it. Does this make sense?… If your pancreas is unable to produce a sufficient amount of insulin, or if you are not reacting properly to insulin, your cells won’t receive the right amount of glucose that they need to produce energy. The result is that you feel tired all the time, you become forgetful, you can’t think clearly and many people become moody. So… no sugar rush, but the exact opposite and many times, a “sugar crash”. What About High Blood Sugar There are even more factors that can make you feel tired when you have high blood sugar from eating the wrong TYPE or AMOUNT of foods. When your blood sugar goes too high, your kidneys are working overtime to Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) (cont.) If hyperglycemia persists for at least two or three days, or if ketones appear in the urine, call a doctor. Generally, people with diabetes should test their blood sugar levels at least four times a day: before meals and at bedtime (or following the schedule advised by the prescribed individual diabetes care plan). The urine should be checked for ketones any time the blood sugar level is over 250 mg/dL. When blood sugar stays high despite following a diabetic diet and plan of care, call the nurse, diabetes health educator, or physician for adjustments in the diet. If blood sugars are high because of illness, check for ketones and contact a health professional. Vomiting Confusion Sleepiness Shortness of breath Dehydration Blood sugar levels that stay above 160 mg/dL for longer than a week Glucose readings higher than 300 mg/dL The presence of ketones in the urine Ketoacidosis or diabetic coma is a medical emergency. Call 911 for emergency transport to a hospital or similar emergency center. Please ask your health care professional about the following: How to recognize high blood sugar levels How to treat a high blood sugar level when it occurs in you, a family member, or coworkers How to prevent the blood sugar level from becoming too high How to contact the medical staff during an emergency What emergency supplies to carry to treat high blood sugar Additional educational materials regarding high blood sugar Check blood sugar levels with a blood glucose meter. If blood sugar level is higher than normal, but there are no symptoms, continue routine care such as: Take all diabetes medications on schedule. Eat regular meals. Drink sugar-free and caffeine-free liquids. Take a blood sugar reading every four hours (write it down) u Continue reading >>

Why Blood Sugar Levels Rise Overnight

Why Blood Sugar Levels Rise Overnight

get the scoop When you go to bed, your blood sugar reading is 110, but when you wake up in the morning, it has shot up to 150. Why does this happen? To understand how blood sugar levels can rise overnight without your eating anything, we have to look at where glucose comes from — and where it goes — while we sleep. During the day, the carbohydrates we eat are digested into glucose and absorbed into the bloodstream. Some of this glucose goes to the liver, where it is stored for later use. At night, while we are asleep, the liver releases glucose into the bloodstream. The liver acts as our glucose warehouse and keeps us supplied until we eat breakfast. The amount of glucose being used is matched by the amount of glucose being released by the liver, so blood sugar levels should remain constant. what is the dawn phenomenon? A rise in blood sugar level between approximately 3 A.M. and the time you wake up is called the “dawn phenomenon.” The liver is supposed to release just enough glucose to replace what is being used, and insulin works as the messenger to tell the liver how much is enough. But if there's not enough insulin (as with type 1 diabetes), or if there's enough insulin but it cannot communicate its message to the liver (as with type 2 diabetes), the liver starts to release glucose much too quickly. In addition, levels of hormones such as cortisol begin to increase in the early morning hours, which can contribute to altered insulin sensitivity. The result? Blood sugar levels rise. This is why blood sugar levels can go up between the time you go to bed and the time you wake up. what can you do about it? You might be able to make changes in the timing of your meals, medications, or insulin injections to help prevent dawn phenomenon. First, keep a detailed rec Continue reading >>

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar

www.CardioSmart.org Hyperglycemia means your blood sugar is too high. It can happen if you miss your diabetes medicine, do not eat healthy foods, or do not exercise. Illness, stress, and hormones can also cause your blood sugar to rise. In some people, it occurs for no apparent reason. If you have type 2 diabetes, it may take days for your blood sugar to rise too high. With type 1 diabetes, it may happen faster. By checking your blood sugar, youmay be able to prevent this and avoid an emergency. Signs of high blood sugar You may havemild high blood sugar if you: • Feel very thirsty and urinate more. • Have warm, dry skin. You may havemoderate high blood sugar if you: • Breathe fast and deeply. • Have a fruity breath odor. • Have belly pain, poor appetite, or vomiting. • Are dizzy or weak. • Urinate less. • Have blurred vision that slowly gets worse. • Feel drowsy and have trouble waking up. You may have severe high blood sugar if you: • Have a rapid heart rate and a weak pulse. • Have rapid, deep breathing with a strong, fruity breath odor. • Feel very sleepy and weak. • Fainted or passed out. How to prevent high blood sugar • Post a list of symptoms where you can see it often. Make sure others know the symptoms and what to do in case of an emergency. • Check your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or are not doing your normal routine. • Teach others at work and at home how to check your blood sugar. • Have a medical alert bracelet or other medical identification with you at all times. • Develop a plan. Talk with your doctor about howmuch insulin to take, depending on your blood sugar level. • Take your medicines as prescribed. Do not skip your di Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Introduction High blood sugar in diabetes occurs when the sugar (glucose) level in the blood rises above normal. It is also called hyperglycemia. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar may be caused by not getting enough insulin or missing your diabetes medicine. It may also be caused by eating too much food, skipping exercise, or being ill or stressed. Unlike low blood sugar, high blood sugar usually happens slowly over hours or days. Blood sugar levels above your target range may make you feel tired and thirsty. If your blood sugar keeps rising, your kidneys will make more urine and you can get dehydrated. Signs of dehydration include being thirstier than usual and having darker urine than usual. Without treatment, severe dehydration can be life-threatening. Over time, high blood sugar can damage the eyes, heart, kidneys, blood vessels, and nerves. Watch for symptoms of high blood sugar. Symptoms include feeling very tired or thirsty and urinating more often than usual. As long as you notice the symptoms, you will probably have time to treat high blood sugar so that you can prevent an emergency. Three things can help you prevent high blood sugar problems: Test your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or not following your normal routine. Testing lets you see when your blood sugar is above your target range, even if you don't have symptoms. Then you can treat it early. Call your doctor if you often have high blood sugar or your blood sugar is often above your target range. Your medicine may need to be adjusted or changed. Drink extra water or drinks that don't have caffeine or sugar to prevent dehydration. How do you prevent high blood sugar emergencies? Treat infections early Infections that aren't treated (such as urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

November is National Diabetes Month and Alaska Sleep Clinic is dedicating this month’s blog posts to raising awareness for diabetic complications and how they correlate with sleep disorders and overall tiredness. SLEEP PROBLEMS AND SNORING MAY PREDICT DIABETES Studies have shown that individuals who consistently have a bad night's sleep are more likely to develop conditions linked to diabetes and heart disease. Loud snoring sleepers (many of whom may have sleep apnea), compared to quiet sleepers, double (2x) their risks of developing certain types of metabolic syndrome(s); including diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure. This likelihood also increased dramatically to 80% in those who found it difficult to fall asleep and to 70% for those who woke up feeling not as refreshed. Blood Sugar and Sleep Problems Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels, and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep. It’s a vicious cycle. As the amount of sleep decreases, blood sugar increases, escalating the issue. Lack of sleep has been shown to increase blood sugar levels and the risk of diabetic issues. Higher blood sugar means less long-lasting fat metabolism in the night and even less sleep. Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine found that people who slept less than 6 hours a night had more blood sugar complications compared to those who received 8 hours of sleep. HIGH BLOOD SUGAR - HYPERGLYCEMIA Sleepless and restless nights hurt more than your mood and energy; it is a form of chronic stress on the body. When there is added stress on your body this results in having higher blood sugar levels. When researchers restricted people with type-1 diabetes to just 4 hours of sleep, their sensitivity to insulin was reduced by 20% compared to that after a full nig Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fatigue — Get Your Energy Back

Diabetes Fatigue — Get Your Energy Back

Fatigue is one of the most common and most disabling symptoms of diabetes. What causes all this exhaustion and how can we get our energy back? Some studies have reported that as many as 85% of people with diabetes experience fatigue, defined as excessive tiredness that interferes with one or more life functions. As a Diabetes Self-Management reader named Donnah wrote, “Since being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, my housework suffers dramatically, I don’t do half of the things that I used to do with my child. When I do find the time and energy to do things, I am easily worn out and need to rest. I can’t even keep a job. I am on disability because of it and I hate this.” Causes of fatigue How does diabetes make you tired? • High blood sugar makes blood sticky, so it can’t get through the capillaries as easily to bring oxygen to cells. You know how you get sleepy after a big meal? High blood sugar can mean having that feeling all the time. • Insulin resistance keeps glucose out of body cells, so they don’t have fuel. • High blood sugar also causes inflammation. Remember how exhausted you get with the flu? That is, in part, inflammation. The same thing happens with poorly controlled diabetes. • Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can cause fatigue. • The mental stress of coping with diabetes can wear out your mind and spirit. Many other conditions besides diabetes can cause fatigue. If your sugars are under control, but you still lack energy, consider being tested for: • Sleep apnea, which causes exhaustion and is very common in diabetes. If you wake up tired, ask your doctor for a sleep test. • Anemia, or a lack of red blood cells or hemoglobin (the protein responsible for transporting oxygen) in the blood. • Low or high thyroid. • Low sex hormo Continue reading >>

How Blood Sugar Levels Affect Your Sleep

How Blood Sugar Levels Affect Your Sleep

Dr. Doni discusses why eating too much, too late can make it hard to sleep (it’s all about blood sugar). She offers some simple tips to help you take control. In the introduction to this series of articles I gave an overview of 12 things that can disrupt our sleep. This week, we’ll focus on blood sugar – and how eating too much of the wrong things can pull us into a vicious cycle of over-eating and blood sugar fluctuations that can have a serious impact on our ability to sleep. Did you notice that you felt sleepy after your Thanksgiving meal last week? This lull in energy is often attributed to tryptophan, an essential amino acid found in turkey meat that is known to make us feel sleepy. However that sleepiness is also due to a rise in your blood sugar levels as the carbs from your meal make their way into your blood stream. Then, the day after Thanksgiving, did you notice that you felt hungrier or that you craved sweets? This is because, once your blood sugar goes high (the technical term for this is hyperglycemia) for even just one meal, it will always be followed by a dip in blood sugar (hypoglycemia) a few hours later. This dip will make you to want to eat more and repeat the pattern of eating a large amount of carbohydrates. In fact, some people end up eating more the day after Thanksgiving than they did on Thanksgiving itself. As you might imagine, once this pattern starts, it is difficult to get it to stop. The more often you consume large, Thanksgiving-sized meals, the more likely your body is to send the signals that lead you to have another large meal. This is because a rise in blood sugar is followed by a rise in insulin, the hormone which causes the sugar to move into your cells to be used to make energy. Then, when your blood sugar is low again, you a Continue reading >>

Does High Blood Sugar Make You Sleepy?

Does High Blood Sugar Make You Sleepy?

Does High Blood Sugar Make You Sleepy? In this video, you can find out why you feel tired and sleepy and what can you do to fix this and get healthy again. If you found this *Does high blood sugar make you sleepy* video helpful, then share it with your friends and family. Thanks! Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

Is This Why You’re Tired All The Time?

Is This Why You’re Tired All The Time?

If you have diabetes and you’re tired all the time, don’t just chalk the fatigue up to your fluctuating blood sugar. Turns out that the emotional toll of dealing with diabetes can be what’s behind your fatigue, according to a new study published in The Diabetes Educator. And you don’t have to just take it. Researchers from the University of Illinois College of Nursing measured the blood sugar levels of 83 diabetic women over the age of 40, and also asked them general questions about their health. Instead of shifting blood sugar levels being linked with fatigue—as is often assumed by doctors—other factors, like depression and BMI, were shown to be greater indicators of whether women felt constantly tired. "People have always assumed blood sugar is the cause of fatigue," says lead study author Cynthia Fritschi, RN, PhD. "It really isn't. Stress, depression, sleep—all of these play a bigger factor in fatigue than blood sugar or blood glucose.” Here’s the problem: Being tired makes you less likely to do what you need to do to keep your diabetes in check, like exercising and eating healthy meals. And doctors don’t typically pick up on these lifestyle issues. "People want to know why they're lacking that get-up-and-go, but doctors don't ask how are you feeling? how are you sleeping? how is your daytime activity?” says Fritschi. Here’s how to make sure your fatigue is being addressed: Be specific. When discussing symptoms with your doctor, state the outcome as well, says Fritschi: Because I'm tired, I'm not able to do x, y and z. "It helps your doctor see that your fatigue is not just a symptom; it's keeping you from taking care of yourself." Take your own health inventory. "Think of the things you can control," says Fritschi. "What's your diet and leve Continue reading >>

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