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Does High Blood Sugar Affect Fetal Movement

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Fetal Monitoring, Gestational Diabetes, Integrative Medicine, Pregnancy and Birth, Weight Management What is self blood glucose monitoring? Once you are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes, you and your health care providers will want to know more about your day-to-day blood sugar levels. It is important to know how your exercise habits and eating patterns affect your blood sugars. Also, as your pregnancy progresses, the placenta will release more of the hormones that work against insulin. Testing your blood sugar level at important times during the day will help determine if proper diet and weight gain have kept blood sugar levels normal or if extra insulin is needed to help keep the fetus protected. Self blood glucose monitoring is done by using a special device to obtain a drop of your blood and test it for your blood sugar level. Your doctor or other health care provider will explain the procedure to you. Make sure that you are shown how to do the testing before attempting it on your own. Some items you may use to monitor your blood sugar levels are: Lancet–a disposable, sharp needle-like sticker for pricking the finger to obtain a drop of blood. Lancet device–a springloaded finger sticking device. Test strip–a chemically treated strip to which a drop of blood is applied. Color chart–a chart used to compare against the color on the test strip for blood sugar level. Glucose meter–a device which “reads” the test strip and gives you a digital number value. Your health care provider can advise you where to obtain the self-monitoring equipment in your area. You may want to inquire if any places rent or loan glucose meters, since it is likely you won't be needing it after your baby is born. How often and when should I test? You may need to test your blo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a kind of diabetes that develops only during pregnancy. (Gestation is another word for pregnancy.) GDM usually develops between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy and will probably go away when the baby is born. Our bodies use the food we eat to get the sugar we need for energy. Insulin is a chemical made by our pancreas. It helps the sugar leave the blood and go into our body cells, where it is used as a kind of fuel. When this happens the way it should, the level of sugar in the blood goes down and our bodies have the energy for a full and active life. In people with diabetes, this system In people with diabetes, this system doesn't work. When you have diabetes, your body can't use the energy from the food you eat. Sugar stays in the blood instead of going into the cells of the body. Who gets GDM? Women who are over 30 years old, are obese, or have a family history of diabetes have the greatest chance of getting GDM. I But it can happen to any pregnant woman! GDM usually can't be prevented. If you have had GDM in one pregnancy, you are likely to have it again in later pregnancies. GDM occurs in up to 3% (3 of 100) of all pregnant women, but it is much more common in: Hispanic Americans, African Americans, Native Americans. How do I know if I have GDM? GDM usually has no symptoms. That's why all pregnant women should be checked for it. A blood test is the only way to be sure you have it. If you have had GDM in an earlier pregnancy, your doctor should test for it at your first visit for this pregnancy. If you have never had GDM before, your doctor should test for it between the 24th and 28th weeks of your pregnancy. How is the test done? When you are checked for GDM, you will be asked to drink a sugary drink and have a blood test Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which the body can't produce enough insulin, or it can't use it properly. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose (sugar) to enter the cells to be used as fuel. When glucose cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia or high blood sugar. Damage from diabetes comes from the effects of hyperglycemia on other organ systems including the eyes, kidneys, heart, blood vessels, and nerves. In early pregnancy, hyperglycemia can result in birth defects. What are the different types of diabetes? There are three basic types of diabetes including: Type 1 diabetes. Also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children or young adults, but can start at any age. Type 2 diabetes. A metabolic disorder resulting from the body's inability to make enough, or properly use, insulin. It used to be called noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Gestational diabetes. A condition in which the blood glucose level is elevated and other diabetic symptoms appear during pregnancy in a woman who has not previously been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease, which, if not controlled, can be life-threatening. It is often associated with long-term complications that can affect every system and part of the body. Diabetes can contribute to eye disorders and blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation, and nerve damage. What happens with diabetes and pregnancy? During pregnancy, the placenta supplies a growing fetus with nutrients and water. The placenta also makes a variety of horm Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diagnosed in a pregnant woman with no history of any kind of diabetes in her life. Like the general form, the gestational type is characterized by abnormally high blood glucose levels [1]. High glucose levels in the blood can be dangerous both for the mother and child. Gestational diabetes is usually diagnosed later in pregnancy; so, if you have diabetes in the first trimester that often means you have had it before getting pregnant [2]. Gestational Diabetes Classification Gestational diabetes mellitus or GDM (common) [3] Gestational diabetes insipidus or GDI (rare) [4] What causes diabetes during pregnancy? Researches are still being carried out to find the exact factors triggering high blood glucose levels in pregnancy. But, the hormonal and other changes occurring in your body are known to be responsible for the problem. Certain genetic factors have also been recognized to play a role in some cases [5]. Pathophysiology of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus The body changes during pregnancy make your body somewhat resistant to insulin [6]. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to help your body use glucose for producing energy. The reduced functioning of insulin during pregnancy causes glucose build up in the blood, leading to diabetes. Gestational diabetes is more likely to occur late in the second trimester or during the third trimester as the pregnancy hormone levels gradually becomes higher with the advancement of your pregnancy [7]. What are the risk factors for gestational diabetes? Being overweight before conceiving Being over 25 years of age [7] History of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Family history of type 2 diabetes Carrying twins A tendency to have high blood glucose levels, but not hi Continue reading >>

A Guide To Gestational Diabetes

A Guide To Gestational Diabetes

This page by no means replaces the treatment that you should seek from your health care team. Diabetes and pregnancy require a program of treatment individualized to you and your baby. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is glucose intolerance that is diagnosed between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Glucose intolerance means a problem in the body’s usual process for changing the glucose (sugar) from food into energy. Normally, the pancreas makes insulin that carries the glucose into the cells. The extra glucose is stored in muscle, liver, and fat cells. When you’re pregnant, the placenta makes hormones that work against the body’s insulin. During pregnancy, the body needs three to four times as much insulin as it usually does. In gestational diabetes, the body’s insulin supply cannot keep up with the need. The extra glucose stays in the blood and crosses the placenta to the baby. Who gets gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. Your chances of developing gestational diabetes are greater if you: Have a family history of diabetes Are overweight Have had a baby weighing more than 9 pounds at birth Have had a stillbirth Are of an ethnic origin at increased risk for Type 2 diabetes, such as Native American, African American, or Hispanic However, gestational diabetes can occur even with no risk factors. How is gestational diabetes diagnosed? It is important to detect and treat gestational diabetes early so that the developing baby is not affected. If you are at high risk for diabetes, you will be tested early in pregnancy. All women, regardless of risk, should be screened for gestational diabetes by taking an oral glucose tolerance test between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. This should be done in the morni Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: What Happens When Pregnancy Affects Your Blood Sugar?

Gestational Diabetes: What Happens When Pregnancy Affects Your Blood Sugar?

One of the many changes women experience during pregnancy is how their bodies process insulin. Pregnancy causes your body to become more insulin resistant. This isn’t a problem for most expectant mothers. Exercise and a healthy diet reduce your risk of developing gestational diabetes, but some women experience high blood sugar levels during pregnancy. “The main risk of gestational diabetes is having a larger than normal baby,” said Dr. Gregory Tyler, a Marshfield Clinic OB-GYN physician. “That can lead to a more complicated delivery and increase the likelihood you’ll need a C-section. Sometimes there are abnormal changes in the baby’s blood glucose levels after delivery.” It’s important to manage gestational diabetes for the safety of the baby and expectant mother. Testing takes place in the second trimester Pregnant women are tested for gestational diabetes at 26-28 weeks. Your doctor may test you early if you have risk factors like previous history of the condition, family history of Type 2 diabetes or elevated body mass index. The test, called the glucose challenge, involves drinking a sugary solution and having your blood sugar checked an hour later. You’ll need more testing if your results are above normal. Lifestyle changes are the first choice treatment If you’re diagnosed with gestational diabetes, you’ll immediately get connected with nutrition counseling to help you find ways to lower blood sugar levels through diet,” Tyler said. Diet and exercise are enough to keep most women in a safe range without medication. Your doctor will prescribe pills to lower your blood sugar if lifestyle changes don’t work. The next step is insulin injections in the most challenging cases. You’ll need to check your blood sugar levels while fasting and tw Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes At 30 Weeks Pregnant

Gestational Diabetes At 30 Weeks Pregnant

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that only occurs during pregnancy, as the name implies. It’s often diagnosed late in pregnancy, typically after 24th week pregnant. The good news, most pregnant women with the condition can successfully deliver healthy babies. If you’re diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 30 weeks pregnant, here are pieces of helpful information to remember. What to expect at 30 weeks pregnant? Third trimester starts from week 28 of pregnancy and lasts to giving birth (typically around 40th week of pregnancy). At 30 weeks pregnant, your baby continues to be more active and therefore you can feel lots of your baby movements each day. You may be aware of many movements. There is no set number of these movements since it can vary from woman to woman, every pregnancy is unique. Just make sure you know the pattern of your baby movements! If this pattern changes, tell your doctor! This week is also the time of when the receptors of your baby will be completely developed. The baby’s brain is also getting bigger. Another significant change, the bone marrow of your baby usually has taken over production of red blood cells. This is very important step since it means the baby is better able to thrive on her /his own once born. And at 31 weeks pregnant, the baby will start to get signals from all five senses, more sensitive to what you eat, listen to the sound of your voice, perceive dark and light. As the baby continuously grows and develops at 30th week of pregnancy, you may also experience some discomforts associated with these changes, these include: Feeling of breathless. This discomfort can occur due to you have extra pounds of weight to carry around and your bump put more pressure to your lungs. At 29-32 weeks of pregnancy, night leg cramps Continue reading >>

Fetal Movement Counts

Fetal Movement Counts

There is a simple way to check your baby's health at home or anywhere, called a fetal movement count. Every baby has normal sleep and awake times, so your baby will have periods of both quiet and active time. A movement may be a kick, stretch, turn or flip. Tip Your baby might be quite active while you are at work, but that may not be a very relaxing, easy place for you to count movements. Try resting in bed at home and counting kicks and movements there. Your baby won't slow down and become less active before birth. The movements may change - as your baby grows, there is less room to maneuver - but the frequency of movement should not decrease. By keeping track of your baby's movements for each day during the third trimester, you will get to know your baby's activity pattern. This can help alert you if your baby is not feeling well. A total of 10 or more distinct movements in 2 hours suggests that your baby is doing well. If your baby is moving less than usual, this may be a sign that he or she is under some stress or that a problem may be developing. If you are worried and do not have at least five movements in 1 hours, call your health care provider. When to count Once a day, during the third trimester of your pregnancy, record your baby's activity. Choose the time of day your baby is the most active, and begin timing fetal movements at about the same time every day. If you smoke and have not been able to quit during your pregnancy, try not to smoke for at least 1 hour before you start counting. (Your baby gets less oxygen and food because nicotine from cigarettes tightens up your blood vessels.) How to count Choose a quiet place where you can focus on your baby's movements without being distracted. Lie down on your side or sit in a comfortable chair. When you count Continue reading >>

Increased Fetal Activity With Low Maternal Blood Glucose Levels In Pregnancies Complicated By Diabetes.

Increased Fetal Activity With Low Maternal Blood Glucose Levels In Pregnancies Complicated By Diabetes.

Abstract Ten diabetic pregnant women were studied during the thirty-sixth to fortieth weeks of gestation to determine whether maternal blood glucose levels influence fetal activity. Maternal blood glucose level was monitored and controlled utilizing an artificial pancreas (Biostator) while fetal activity and heart rate were quantitated by continuous ultrasonic and electrocardiac fetal monitoring. Fetal activity was confirmed independently by a maternal controlled event marker. There was no difference in fetal movement with heart rate accelerations between periods of maternal normoglycemia defined as blood glucose levels between 60 and 140 mg/dl (3.3-7.8 mMol/L) and periods of maternal hyperglycemia (blood glucose level greater than 140 mg/dl or 7.8 mMol/L). Maternal blood glucose levels of less than 60 mg/dl (3.3 mMol/L) were accompanied by a significant (p less than 0.001) increase in fetal activity (19.9 +/- 3.9 SEM episodes of fetal movement per 20-minute observation period versus 8.0 +/- 5 episodes during periods of hyperglycemia). These observations indicate that hyperglycemia does not stimulate fetal activity and that the obstetric practice of beverages with high glucose content administered during antepartum testing (in an attempt to increase fetal movement) should be reevaluated in diabetic women. Continue reading >>

Baby Obesity Research: No Need To Panic

Baby Obesity Research: No Need To Panic

Babies are to be “treated in the womb for obesity”, according to the Daily Mail. The newspaper said that overweight mothers-to-be will be given a diabetes pill “to cut the risk of having a fat child”. The news is based on an ongoing study to find out if giving the diabetes drug metformin to obese pregnant women can reduce the risk of their babies being born overweight. This is of interest as obese women tend to have poorer control of their blood sugar, a problem that metformin can help regulate in people with diabetes. If exposed to excess blood sugar in the womb, growing babies may be born with excess birth weight, which has been linked to difficulties during birth and illness in later life. While the Mail’s front-page presentation of this research might make this research seem frightening or frivolous, it should be noted that metformin is already used to help some pregnant women control their blood sugar and prevent complications. The study has also gone through various safety checks to ensure it does not pose any significant risks to either mother or baby and that it could be of potential medical benefit. This research is neither new nor finished yet, and it is unclear why the Daily Mail has chosen to cover it. This study began in 2010 and will run until 2014, when its results will be revealed. Only then will we be able to see if the research is truly newsworthy. What is metformin? Metformin is currently used by patients with type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar levels. It is commonly the first choice of medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, particularly in overweight and obese patients. In type 2 diabetes, patients build up too much glucose (sugar) in their blood, which can make them very ill. This happens either because they do not make Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Topic Overview What is gestational diabetes? If your blood sugar level first becomes too high when you are pregnant, you have gestational diabetes. It usually goes back to normal after the baby is born. High blood sugar can cause problems for you and your baby. Your baby may grow too large, which can cause problems during delivery. Your baby may also be born with low blood sugar. But with treatment, most women who have gestational diabetes are able to control their blood sugar and give birth to healthy babies. Women who have had gestational diabetes are more likely than other women to develop type 2 diabetes later on. You may be able to prevent or reduce the severity of type 2 diabetes by staying at a healthy weight, eating healthy foods, and increasing your physical activity. The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps your body properly use and store the sugar from the food you eat. This keeps your blood sugar level in a target range. When you are pregnant, the placenta makes hormones that can make it harder for insulin to work. This is called insulin resistance. A pregnant woman can get diabetes when her pancreas cannot make enough insulin to keep her blood sugar levels within a target range. Because gestational diabetes may not cause symptoms, it is important for you to be tested for gestational diabetes. Sometimes a pregnant woman who has symptoms has been living with another type of diabetes without knowing it. If you have symptoms from another type of diabetes, they may include: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Increased hunger. Blurred vision. Pregnancy causes most women to urinate more often and to feel more hungry. So having these symptoms doesn't always mean that a woman has diabetes. Talk with your doctor if you have these symptoms, so t Continue reading >>

37 Weeks Pregnant With Gestational Diabetes

37 Weeks Pregnant With Gestational Diabetes

By week 37 of pregnancy, a woman has likely been managing her gestational diabetes for about nine weeks. Blood tests for the condition are performed at the beginning of the third trimester, around 28 weeks. Although gestational diabetes does place women in a higher pregnancy risk category, the condition can be managed with careful vigilance. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says that between two and 10 percent of women are diagnosed with gestational diabetes annually. The ACOG defines gestational diabetes as excess levels of glucose in the blood. Excess glucose occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin to convert glucose into energy. The condition comes and goes with pregnancy. Women who develop gestational diabetes with one pregnancy are more likely to develop it in subsequent pregnancies. The ACOG says that up to one half of them will develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Diet, exercise and, occasionally, medication are key to gestational diabetes control. Patients need to avoid refined carbohydrates, sugar and caffeine and maintain a regimen of either swimming, walking or prenatal yoga. Insulin shots are sometimes necessary. If gestational diabetes is not controlled, serious complications may occur. They include premature birth; preeclampsia, or abnormally high maternal blood pressure; respiratory distress syndrome, or difficulties with baby’s breathing at birth; birth defects; and macrosomia, or an extremely large baby. According to Midwifery Today, the baby can go into diabetic shock and die during birth in cases of improper disease management. By 37 weeks, women with gestational diabetes will be checked weekly. Because of the risks of preeclampsia and macrosomia, these women have a slightly higher chance of delivering their ba Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Home » About Diabetes » Pregnancy » Gestational Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is the type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Like other forms od diabetes, gestational diabetes affects the way the body uses the glucose [sugar] in the blood and as a result the blood sugars rise too high. The glucose in the blood is the body’s main source of energy. If gestational diabetes is untreated or uncontrolled, it can result in a variety of health problems for both that mother and baby. So it is important that a treatment plan is worked out to keep blood sugars within the normal range. The good news is that controlling blood sugars can help to ensure a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. Signs and Symptoms Most women do not have any signs or symptoms of gestational diabetes but your healthcare professional will check for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. When signs and symptoms do occur they include: Excessive thirst Increased urination. About 3 to 5% of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes. The Causes of Gestational Diabetes Normal metabolism Normally during digestion the body breaks down the carbohydrates you eat into simple sugars [glucose] and this glucose is absorbed into the blood and transported around the body by the blood vessel system to provide the energy needed for all our activities. This process cannot take place without insulin. Insulin is produced in the pancreas, a gland behind the stomach, and helps the glucose to pass into the cells to provide energy and maintains normal levels of glucose in the blood. The liver also plays a part in maintaining normal blood glucose levels. When there is more glucose in the cells than your body needs for energy, it is removed from the blood and stored it in the liver Continue reading >>

What Might Go Wrong In The Third Trimester?

What Might Go Wrong In The Third Trimester?

Weeks 28 through 40 bring the arrival of the third trimester. This exciting time is definitely the home stretch for expectant mothers, but it also presents a time where complications can occur. Just as each trimester can bring its own challenges, so can the third trimester. Prenatal care is especially important in the third trimester because the types of complications that can arise at this time are more easily managed if detected early. You’ll likely start visiting your obstetrician every other week from 28 to 36 weeks, then once per week until your little one arrives. According to the American Diabetes Association, as many as 9.2 percent of pregnant women have gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs because the hormonal changes of pregnancy make it more difficult for your body to effectively use insulin. When insulin cannot do its job of lowering blood sugar to normal levels, the result is abnormally high glucose (blood sugar) levels. Most women have no symptoms. While this condition is usually not dangerous for the mother, it poses several problems for the fetus. Specifically, macrosomia (excessive growth) of the fetus can increase the likelihood of cesarean delivery and the risk of birth injuries. When glucose levels are well-controlled, macrosomia is less likely. At the beginning of the third trimester (between weeks 24 and 28), all women should get tested for gestational diabetes. During the glucose tolerance test (also known as the screening glucose challenge test), you will consume a drink that contains a certain amount of glucose (sugar) and at a specified time later your doctor will test your blood sugar levels. For the oral glucose tolerance test, your blood sugar levels are checked after you have fasted for at least eight hours and you’ve drank Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes

Understanding Gestational Diabetes

Introduction Approximately 3 to 5 percent of all pregnant women in the United States are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes. These women and their families have many questions about this disorder. Some of the most frequently asked questions are: What is gestational diabetes and how did I get it? How does it differ from other kinds of diabetes? Will it hurt my baby? Will my baby have diabetes? What can I do to control gestational diabetes? Will I need a special diet? Will gestational diabetes change the way or the time my baby is delivered? Will I have diabetes in the future? This brochure will address these and many other questions about diet, exercise, measurement of blood sugar levels, and general medical and obstetric care of women with gestational diabetes. It must be emphasized that these are general guidelines and only your health care professional(s) can tailor a program specific to your needs. You should feel free to discuss any concerns you have with your doctor or other health care provider, as no one knows more about you and the condition of your pregnancy. What is gestational diabetes and what causes it? Diabetes (actual name is diabetes mellitus) of any kind is a disorder that prevents the body from using food properly. Normally, the body gets its major source of energy from glucose, a simple sugar that comes from foods high in simple carbohydrates (e.g., table sugar or other sweeteners such as honey, molasses, jams, and jellies, soft drinks, and cookies), or from the breakdown of complex carbohydrates such as starches (e.g., bread, potatoes, and pasta). After sugars and starches are digested in the stomach, they enter the blood stream in the form of glucose. The glucose in the blood stream becomes a potential source of energy for the entire body, sim Continue reading >>

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