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Does Having Diabetes Shorten Your Life

Myths & Facts

Myths & Facts

There are many myths about diabetes which can make separating fact from fiction difficult. To cut through the confusion, we’ve broken down some of the common misconceptions: Fact - There is no such thing as “mild” diabetes. All types of diabetes are serious and can lead to complications if not well managed. Diabetes can affect quality of life and can reduce life expectancy. Fact - There are a number of types of diabetes. The most common are type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes Other forms of diabetes are less common. Each type of diabetes has different causes and may be managed in different ways but once someone has any type of diabetes except gestational diabetes, it needs to be managed every day. Gestational diabetes goes away after pregnancy, however it does significantly increase someone's risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. All types of diabetes are complex and serious. Fact - Not all types of diabetes can be prevented. Type 1 is an autoimmune condition, it cannot be prevented and there is no cure. The cause of type 1 diabetes is still unknown. Strong international evidence shows diabetes prevention programs can help prevent type 2 diabetes in up to 58 per cent of cases. There is no single cause of type 2 diabetes, but there are well-established risk factors. Your risk of developing diabetes is also affected by things you cannot change such as family history and ethnicity. Fact - Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes but it is not a direct cause. Some people who are overweight may not develop type 2 diabetes while some people who are of a healthy weight will develop type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is not preventable and not associated with weight, physical inactivity or any other lifestyle factors. Fact - The onset o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: What Effect Does Type 2 Diabetes Have?

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: What Effect Does Type 2 Diabetes Have?

Diabetes can cause serious health complications and have an impact on life expectancy. How much a person's life is reduced depends on a combination of factors, such as the severity of the case, additional complications, and response to treatment. After being diagnosed, most people with diabetes want to know how the condition will affect the length and quality of their life. Each individual varies, but maintaining healthy blood sugar levels often has the largest influence on life expectancy. Relatively few studies have examined the link between diabetes and life expectancy, especially on a large scale. As a result, doctors aren't entirely sure how diabetes relates to how long people with the condition will live. This article will explore more. Fast facts on diabetes and life expectancy: While some estimates exist, there is no way to know exactly how diabetes will affect life expectancy. Type 2 diabetes is thought to have less of an effect on life expectancy than type 1 because people typically develop the condition much later in life. Generally, anything that helps maintain or contribute to healthy blood sugar levels can reduce the toll diabetes takes. What is the life expectancy of people with type 2 diabetes? A 2010 report by Diabetes UK claims type 2 diabetes reduces life expectancy by roughly 10 years. The same report states that type 1 diabetes may reduce life expectancy by at least 20 years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the average life expectancy in 2014 for American men was 76.4 years and women 81.2 years. A 2012 Canadian study found that women aged 55 years and over with diabetes lost on average 6 years of life while men lost 5 years. Also, a 2015 study concluded that the risk of death associated with type 2 diabetes could b Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: Ending Myths And Getting Started On Your Best Life Yet

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: Ending Myths And Getting Started On Your Best Life Yet

For far too long, diabetes has been associated with shorter-than-average life spans and a lower quality of life for those people with the condition. But as it turns out, when diabetes is managed well, this is often not the case. With the proper tools, attitude, and support system, anyone with diabetes can change the course of their health. Why Having Diabetes Doesn’t Necessarily Mean You’ll Die Sooner It’s true that, when you consider heart-related cardiovascular complications, men and women with diabetes tend to have higher rates of early death than their peers without the disease, according to research. But it’s also true that no two people with diabetes are the same, and how a person manages his or her blood sugar is key when considering how the disease might affect your life span. “Having diabetes won’t necessarily change someone's life expectancy — it's how diabetes progresses. For every individual, diabetes is going to progress differently,” says Joanne Rinker, RD, CDE, director of practice and content development at the American Association of Diabetes Educators. “If it progresses at an extremely slow rate, because diabetes is so individualized, it might be so slow that it does not impact their life expectancy whatsoever.” Instead of thinking only about how diabetes will impact your life span, experts suggest that people with the condition should take a broader look at their overall health. “Diabetes is not a singular disease that one should focus on. Focus on how you can improve the different risk factors that can impact the functioning of the heart and other organs,” says Medha Munshi, MD, director of geriatric diabetes programs at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. “It's important to think, ‘What are the factors that would impact Continue reading >>

Living Longer With Diabetes

Living Longer With Diabetes

Diabetes tends to shorten your expected life. The good news is that you can do a lot to get those years back, and most of those things feel good. Studies disagree on exactly how much damage diabetes does. A Princeton University study of about 20,000 adults found that diabetes cuts about 8.5 years off the life expectancy of an average 50 year old, compared to a 50 year old without diabetes. Most of this early death comes from complications such as heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. People with diabetes are also less likely to be employed and more likely to be depressed and disabled, all of which can make life harder and potentially shorter, researchers found. However, a recent Dutch study published in the online journal PLOS One found much more encouraging results. People with Type 2 and an average age of 66 seem to have the same death rate as those without diabetes. Various factors influence death rates. According to the British site Diabetes.co.uk, “How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of complications, and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy.” What to do Most complications of diabetes come from high blood sugars and high blood pressure. Too much sugar damages blood vessels and nerves. Almost any organ can fail given poor circulation caused by diabetes. According to mainstream medicine, the best way to lengthen life with Type 2 is to keep sugars down. In a typical recommendation, Diabetes.co.uk writes, “Keeping blood sugar levels within the recommended ranges will [reduce] the likelihood of complications and increase life expectancy…Enjoy a healthy lifestyle, with a well balanced diet, and regular activity.” If that doesn’t work, take medications, they say. With about ten categories of pr Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Linked To Lower Life Expectancy

Type 1 Diabetes Linked To Lower Life Expectancy

HealthDay Reporter today lose more than a decade of life to the chronic disease, despite improved treatment of both diabetes and its complications, a new Scottish study reports. Men with type 1 diabetes lose about 11 years of life expectancy compared to men without the disease. And, women with type 1 diabetes have their lives cut short by about 13 years, according to a report published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The findings "provide a more up-to-date quantification of how much type 1 diabetes cuts your life span now, in our contemporary era," said senior author Dr. Helen Colhoun, a clinical professor in the diabetes epidemiology unit of the University of Dundee School of Medicine in Scotland. Diabetes' impact on heart health appeared to be the largest single cause of lost years, according to the study. But, the researchers also found that type 1 diabetics younger than 50 are dying in large numbers from conditions caused by issues in management of the disease -- diabetic coma caused by critically low blood sugar, and ketoacidosis caused by a lack of insulin in the body. "These conditions really reflect the day-to-day challenge that people with type 1 diabetes continue to face, how to get the right amount of insulin delivered at the right time to deal with your blood sugar levels," Colhoun said. A second study, also in JAMA, suggested that some of these early deaths might be avoided with intensive blood sugar management. In that paper, researchers reduced patients' overall risk of premature death by about a third, compared with diabetics receiving standard care, by conducting multiple blood glucose tests throughout the day and constantly adjusting insulin levels to hit very specific blood sugar levels. "Across the board, indiv Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Person With Age 35 Can Have A Life Span Of 70 And How To Manage It By Not Taking Medication

Can A Diabetic Person With Age 35 Can Have A Life Span Of 70 And How To Manage It By Not Taking Medication

Kapalbhati & anulomvilom are Yoga exercise and if you do some exercise of 30 minutes in the morning & 30 minutes in the evening you can definitely control diabetes & if possible about 15 minutes fast walk. The Yoga book /C.D is available at almost every book shop. Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes, that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. * Overall, the risk for death among people with diabetes is about twice that of people of similar age without diabetes. * Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about 2 to 4 times higher than adults without diabetes. * The risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher among people with diabetes. Monitoring and controlling the levels of diabetes indicators, including HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), postprandial plasma glucose (PPG), body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and lipids, is an integral component of diabetes care at every stage of the disease. Diabetic patients should conduct the following tests periodically. A: HbA1c. HbA1c is a lab test that shows the average level of blood sugar (glucose) over the previous 3 months. It shows how well you are controlling your diabetes. B: Control your high Blood pressure, if any. Normal blood pressure- <120/80 mmHg. C: Control your blood Cholesterol: Normal cholesterol < 200 mg/dL. LDL <100 mg/dL HDL > 40 mg/dL Triglyceride < 150 mg/dL. D: Diabetic education. Denta Continue reading >>

What To Know About Diabetes And Life Expectancy

What To Know About Diabetes And Life Expectancy

Twenty-nine million Americans and more than 400 million people worldwide have diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes with different underlying causes. But when either type 1 or type 2 diabetes is not well controlled, they lead to a dangerous buildup of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Over time, the damage this does to blood vessels and nerves can lead to serious complications, such as blindness, limb amputation, heart disease, and kidney failure. Diabetes: a Chronic Disease Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires consistent, daily care, which makes it more difficult to control than some other conditions. When damage from diabetes takes too heavy a toll on the body, it can shorten lifespan. In the United States, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death. Thinking about life expectancy is uncomfortable. But, it’s important to know that advances in diabetes care and in how people are taking care of their health can make living a long life with diabetes a reality. Life Expectancy With Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin—a hormone that helps carry glucose to the body’s cells to use for energy. Five to 10% of people with diabetes have type 1. Type 1 diabetes is most frequently diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. This means that people with type 1 diabetes can spend a large part of their lives with the condition. The average person with type 1 diabetes has a shorter lifespan than a person without it—but the life expectancy gap is shrinking. Research in the 1970s estimated that people with type 1 diabetes could expect to live 27 fewer years, on average, than people without the disease. However, a recent study out of Scotland reports that men with type 1 diabetes lose an estimated 11 years and women 13 years of l Continue reading >>

Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Life Expectancy? Live Longer By Spotting These Symptoms

Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Life Expectancy? Live Longer By Spotting These Symptoms

If type 2 diabetes isn't treated properly and well managed, it can lead to a number of other health problems including heart disease. However, there is no way of knowing how long someone with the condition is expected to live. It depends how soon diabetes was diagnosed, any other health conditions unrelated to diabetes and factors including how often people attend health checks and look after their own health. Knowing the symptoms of diabetes can boost the chances of living longer. Diabetes UK said: “Early diagnosis, treatment and good control are vital for good health and reduce the chances of developing serious complications.” Symptoms include urinating more than usual, feeling thirst, feeling tired, cuts or wounds which heal slowly and blurred vision. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. High glucose levels - also known as blood sugar can damage blood vessels, nerves and organs. If diabetes is not properly managed it can lead to serious consequences such as sight loss, limb amputation, kidney failure and stroke. Experts also suggest a mildly raised glucose level that doesn't cause any symptoms can also have long-term damaging effects. The condition can impact life expectancy, how experts have said the length of time people are expected to live with the condition has increased. Seven years ago, Diabetes UK estimated that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. However, a report based on data collected by GP services in the UK between 1991 and 2014, Continue reading >>

Diabetes News: People With Condition Are Now Living Longer And This Is Why

Diabetes News: People With Condition Are Now Living Longer And This Is Why

The findings, based on data collected by GP services in the UK between 1991 and 2014, also show a marked increase in life expectancy for people with the disease, explaining in part its increased prevalence. The study, by the University of Cardiff, found the increased number of people with the disease has also been linked to better diagnosis and rising levels of obesity. Between 1993 and 2010 the proportion of obese people in the UK went from 13 per cent to 26 per cent for men and from 16 per cent to 26 per cent for women. “The number of people with type 2 diabetes in the UK has gone from 700,000 to around 2.8m over two decades, and it continues to increase,” said Professor Craig Currie from Cardiff University’s School of Medicine. “We are also seeing increased life expectancy from the disease which could be due to earlier diagnosis of the condition as well as drugs such as blood pressure tablets and statins for blood cholesterol.” “We are also seeing increased life expectancy from the disease which could be due to earlier diagnosis of the condition as well as drugs such as blood pressure tablets and statins for blood cholesterol.” The data also reveal that the prevalence of diagnosed type 2 diabetes increased with age, although this increase is lower in people aged 80 years and above. The disease prevalence was also generally higher in men than in women above the age of 40 years. Below the age of 40 it was similar. Around 4.5m people live with diabetes in the UK, with more than 90 per cent of those affected having type 2 diabetes. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The condition, which can Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

Type 2 diabetes typically shows up later in life, although the incidence in younger people is increasing. The disease, which is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar), or hyperglycemia, usually results from a combination of unhealthy lifestyle habits, obesity, and genes. Over time, untreated hyperglycemia can lead to serious, life-threatening complications. Type 2 diabetes also puts you at risk for certain health conditions that can reduce your life expectancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diabetes is the 7th most common cause of death in the United States. However, there is no defining statistic to tell you how long you’ll live with type 2 diabetes. The better you have your diabetes under control, the lower your risk for developing associated conditions that may shorten your lifespan. The top cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is cardiovascular disease. This is due to the fact that high blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, and also because people with type 2 diabetes often have high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and other factors that increase the risk of heart disease. When you have type 2 diabetes, there are many factors that can increase your risk of complications, and these complications can impact your life expectancy. They include: High blood sugar levels: Uncontrolled high blood sugar levels affect many organs and contribute to the development of complications. High blood pressure: According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), 71 percent of people with diabetes have high blood pressure. High blood pressure increases the risk of kidney disease, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and other complications. Lipid disorders: According to the ADA, 65 percent of those with diabetes have high low- Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cuts Years Off Life Span Of Americans

Diabetes Cuts Years Off Life Span Of Americans

The study also shows that older adults with diabetes have a lower life expectancy at every age compared to people who do not have the disease. For example, researchers say, the difference at age 60 is 5.4 years; it’s one year by 90. The findings come from a new report commissioned by the National Academy on an Aging Society and was supported by Sanofi-aventis U.S., a pharmaceutical company. It was based on data provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over age 50 done every two years by the University of Michigan. “Given the rise in diabetes among boomers and seniors, these findings are alarming,” Greg O’Neill, PhD, director of the National Academy on an Aging Society, says in a news release. “They paint a stark picture of the impact of diabetes and its complications on healthy aging.” The study shows a significant increase over the past decade in the percentage of adults over age 50 with diabetes, from 11% of non-Hispanic whites in 1998 to 18% in 2008, coinciding with an alarming obesity epidemic affecting most population groups. The increase among adult non-Hispanic blacks has been even more alarming, from 22% to 32% in the past 10 years, study researchers say. Compared to older adults without diabetes, patients with the disease are less likely to be employed and more likely to have other health problems, such as heart disease, depression, and disabilities that get in the way of normal life activities, the researchers say. Scott M. Lynch, PhD, of Princeton University’s Office of Population Research, analyzed data on more than 20,000 adults over the age of 50. The study, described as a “profile,” was written by Nancy Maddox, MPH, a co-founder of Maren Enterprises, a consulting firm specializing in technical a Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes

New study shows recent improvement in years of life lost. With minimal studies to evaluate the impact of type 1 diabetes on life expectancy, studies have been developed to retrospectively look at the effects of diabetes on mortality. Diabetes was also compared to other disease states and causes that had an influence on years of life lost (YLL). The YLL of patients with type 1 diabetes and patients with other disease states were compared to those of the general healthy population. This autoimmune disorder accounts for 10% of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes, and the ability to prevent the development of type 1 diabetes is minimal. Causes have been linked to genetics, and viral infections such as mumps, rubella, cytomegalovirus, measles, influenza, encephalitis, polio, or Epstein-Barr virus. In a study conducted on Australians with type 1 diabetes between the years of 1997 and 2010, researchers looked at the estimated YLL of the type 1 diabetic patients compared to the general public. Researchers used the Chiang method to estimate life expectancy and Arriaga’s method to estimate the impact of age-specific and cause-specific mortalities. Results showed no disparity in terms of YLL from type 1 diabetes in women vs. men. When the YLL was organized into two groups, 1997-2003 and 2004-2010, the 2004-2010 groups showed improvement in life expectancies of 1.9 years in men and 1.5 years in women. Overall, over the time period of the study, patients with type 1 diabetes had a life expectancy of 12.2 years less than the general population. The majority of the YLL was attributed to endocrine and metabolic diseases that occurred between the ages of 10-39, and circulatory diseases that occurred after the age of 40. Medical advances over the years may account for the YLL improve Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

Diabetes is recognized as one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. There was a time when Type 2 diabetes was common in people in their late forties and fifties. However, thanks to the easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyles, poor sleep and a host of other unfavorable factors, type 2 diabetes affects millions of young adults throughout the globe today. A report was commissioned in 2010 by the National Academy on an Aging Society. It showed that diabetes cut off an average of 8.5 years from the lifespan of a regular, diabetic 50-year-old as compared to a 50-year-old without the disease. This data was provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over the age of 50, done every two years by the University of Michigan. Characterized by high blood glucose levels, T2D can be the result of a combination of genes, obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. If left untreated, diabetes can be life-threatening. Complications of this disease can take a serious toll on a patient’s health and well-being. So, how long do diabetics live, you ask? Does having diabetes shorten one’s life? Let’s address these questions, one by one. MORE: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) How Long Do Diabetics Live? Diabetes is a system-wide disorder which is categorized by elevated blood glucose levels. This blood travels throughout the human body and when it is laden with sugar, it damages multiple systems. When the condition is left unchecked or is managed poorly, the lifespan of diabetic patients is reduced due to constant damage. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for preventing its long-term complications is the best coping strategy. So, don’t ignore your doctor’s advice if you’re pre-diabeti Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy Increases For People With Type 1

Life Expectancy Increases For People With Type 1

An Australian study finds people with Type 1 are living longer, but not as long as the average population. A new study on life expectancy and Type 1 diabetes has brought results that can be seen as glass half-empty or glass half-full. The bad news is that life expectancy for people with Type 1 is still shorter than that of the average population; the good news is that people with Type 1 are living longer than ever before. For the study, Australian researchers used government data to measure the life expectancy of people with Type 1 from 1997 to 2010, according to a report in Diabetes in Control. By the end of the study period, men with Type 1 had gained an average of 1.9 years in life expectancy, while women with Type 1 had gained 1.5 years in the same time period. People with Type 1 still had a life expectancy that was 12 years shorter, on average, than that of the average population, however. Researchers attribute the gains in lifespan to rapid medical advances, emerging research, and deepening understanding of Type 1 diabetes. When it comes to children with Type 1, more children are being diagnosed earlier, and intensive insulin therapy is beginning at a younger age to get blood sugar levels under control. Also, insulin pump and blood sugar monitoring technology has improved greatly in the 21st century, creating the possibility for better long-term blood sugar control. With the promise of the development of new therapeutic techniques and smarter pumps, there’s hope that the gap in life expectancy between those with and without Type 1 can continue to close. Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here. Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation, our sister publication. Continue reading >>

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