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Does Gestational Diabetes Make You Hungry

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Is hunger a sign of diabetes? If you don’t have diabetes, could hunger be one of the signs of diabetes? Is being hungry all of the time (polyphagia) a sign that you should go get checked for diabetes? After all, polyphagia is one of the “3 Poly’s,” is part of a triad of symptoms indicating diabetes. In addition to polyphagia, or increased hunger, the symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia are also signs of diabetes. Susan’s story Susan was constantly hunger. She never seemed to feel satisfied as she snacked off and on all day long from increasing hunger pangs. Susan’s hunger had gotten progressively worse over the past year. She noticed that she had been going to the bathroom more frequently, and wasn’t sure if she might be getting a urinary tract infection. Oddly enough, she hadn’t gained any weight. She had even lost a few pounds. She visited her primary care provider, and relayed her symptoms to the nurse. The doctor recommended that Susan be checked for several different conditions, but the one that stuck out in Susan’s mind was diabetes. She had an aunt with diabetes. She remembered how sick she got, and how she’d spend her days in the dialysis unit. Susan didn’t want diabetes, at least the kind that she knew about from her aunt. When Susan contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she was concerned that she did indeed have diabetes. She was waiting for her test results, but she was eager to find out if hunger was a sure sign that she has diabetes? I suggest reading the following articles: We decided to look into it for Susan. Let’s see what we found. Polyphagia: What is it? With polyphagia, even after having just eaten, you will feel hunger, or find that you have cravings for particular foods that monopolize your thoughts. The definition of polyphagia, wh Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes

Understanding Gestational Diabetes

Many of you may have heard of, or even developed, Gestational Diabetes during your pregnancy.For those who are unclear about this topic or simply would like more information; the following article touches on the the risk factors, symptoms, treatment, complications, and prevention of gestational diabetes. During pregnancy, usually around the 24th week, many women develop gestational diabetes. A diagnosis of gestational diabetes doesn?t mean that you had diabetes before you conceived, or that you will have diabetes after giving birth. But it?s important to follow your doctor?s advice regarding blood sugar levels both when planning and during your pregnancy, so you and your baby both remain healthy. In normal conditions, your body is able to break down sugar easily with the help of hormones in the intestine. But with gestational diabetes, the intestine and stomach are unable to digest the sugar molecule called glucose. Glucose is the major source of energy in the body. The pancreas excretes insulin which helps in removing extra sugar from your blood. Gestational diabetes develops when the body doesn?t produce the proper amount of insulin or if cells don?t utilize it properly, resulting in an increased blood sugar level. In cases of severe gestational diabetes, a weekly or daily glucose level test is advised. If these treatments prove ineffective, then insulin injections are recommended by the doctors to control the blood sugar level in the diabetic mother. If the disease of gestational diabetes is left untreated or is not properly controlled, the baby can develop certain complications including Macrosomia, jaundice, respiratory distress syndrome, death after 28 weeks of pregnancy or in infancy. Even though there is no proof that we can 100% prevent a pregnant woman from d Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Excessive Hunger?

Can Diabetes Cause Excessive Hunger?

Yes. No. Sort of. Well, ok, here’s the deal. The shinbone’s connected to the thighbone, the thighbone’s connected to the…. Diabetes can cause high blood sugar, and high blood sugar can give you the munchies. So diabetes doesn’t, by itself, make you hungry. It’s the high blood sugar that can come from out-of-control diabetes that does. Which is crazy, if you think about it. For the most part, the human body does a really great job of maintaining a stable state using a process of small adjustments and counter-adjustments called homeostasis. In the case of blood sugar, the body normally keeps the sugar level just right by balancing little squirts of insulin from the pancreas with little squirts of sugar from the liver. If the liver is running low on its sugar stores your body will give you an advanced head’s up that you need to refuel by sending out hunger signals. Where things get weird is that if your blood sugar is already high, the last thing you need is more sugar (in the form of food), right? But in fact, high blood sugar does cause hunger, even though you do not need more food. This is caused largely by a miss-communication within the body’s sugar homeostasis system. Every cell in your body relies on sugar from the blood for food, but they need insulin to get to the sugar. It’s insulin that moves sugar from the blood to the cells. If there is not enough insulin, or if it isn’t working very well, sugar piles up in the blood while at the same time, it’s not getting into the cells where it’s needed. Being in a state of high blood sugar is sort of like starving to death in the Chef Boyardee warehouse because you don’t have a can opener. The cells don’t really realize that there is a ton of sugar just beyond their membranes; all they know is t Continue reading >>

What If I’m Still Hungry?

What If I’m Still Hungry?

Often women on the GDM diet still feel hungry and more than likely it’s because they aren’t actually eating the recommended daily amount of carbohydrate. First check you’re eating the recommended amount of carbs at all meals and all snacks. All the recipes here at GestationalDiabetesRecipes have the main carbohydrate containing ingredients listed in bold so you know what they are and can adjust to your diet. You can also add a little more protein to your diet, such as lean meat, tofu or eggs as this won’t affect your glucose levels and can make you feel far more satisfied. But too much additional protein can still affect your weight so don’t go overboard. Non-starchy vegetables or ‘free vegetables’ are fine to eat as much of as you want. They will help to keep you feeling full but won’t affect your glucose levels or your weight and are full of nutrients for you and your baby. Drinks such as diet cordials and diet/Zero soft drinks are acceptable if you want to drink something other than water (or some low fat milk). It is up to you whether you want to include foods that are artificially sweetened in your diet. There is no evidence they cause harm in pregnancy but many women still prefer to avoid them. Certain condiments that you may use to cook with and flavour foods such as soy sauce, mustard, vinegar, lemon juice, chilli and garlic, are still okay. See the ‘free foods’ list below for more examples. You may feel extra hungry if you are eating bland foods because you aren’t sure what you can and can’t have. Continue reading >>

Understanding The Risks And Early Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Understanding The Risks And Early Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes can be particularly hard on pregnant women. It can affect both the mother and her unborn child. Known as gestational diabetes, this condition is now more common than ever. In the United States, it is estimated to affect up to 1 in every 10 pregnancies. The rate is said to be similar in Australia, with new cases of gestational diabetes rising a whopping 21% between 2000 and 2010. Fortunately with early diagnosis and treatment, any negative health effects on mother and child can be significantly minimised. In this article, HealthEngine looks at the health risks and early warning signs of gestational diabetes. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is the term given to expecting mothers diagnosed with pre-diabetes (otherwise known as Glucose Intolerance) during their pregnancy. The risk of glucose intolerance – and therefore gestational diabetes – is greatly increased during pregnancy because the efficiency of insulin (the hormone required to remove sugar from our bloodstream) naturally declines during this period. Less efficient insulin means sugar can become 'stuck' in our bloodstream, which leads to many health issues. For this reason, added sugar is basically hazardous to health during and immediately after pregnancy. What are the health risks of gestational diabetes? Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes does not mean you had diabetes before falling pregnant, or that you will have diabetes after pregnancy. But it does mean you need to be extra mindful of the foods you eat to ensure both you and your baby remain healthy. The risks of poorly managed gestational diabetes are serious: The developing foetus is prone to excessive growth and large birth weight, which is not ideal for either mother or child. Children born to mothers with poorly ma Continue reading >>

Why Diet Is A Significant Cause Of Gestational Diabetes

Why Diet Is A Significant Cause Of Gestational Diabetes

As with many issues related to pregnancy and parenting, there are many myths and misconceptions about gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes has been a controversial topic for some time, with even world famous obesterician, Michel Odent, weighing in on the matter. Some medical and health professionals believe gestational diabetes (not to be confused with type 1 diabetes) is a “diagnosis looking for a disease”, because the steps to manage it is exactly the same as the advice to prevent it – with diet. Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are given a label, without any evidence to show that the label improves outcomes. Low carb, high healthy fat eating, quitting smoking and exercise is how you prevent and treat insulin resistance. As Doctor Chatterjee says, “Our genes load the gun, but it's our environment that pulls the trigger”. Our addiction to sugar and processed foods is literally making us — and our future children — sick. If you haven't yet read about the 3 year old who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it's a must read. Women Need Educating, Not Testing A diagnosis of gestational diabetes results in the very advice which should already be given to all pregnant women — long before their glucose tolerance tests. They should eat a low GI diet, eliminate sugar and processed grains, as well as get some daily exercise. Very wise advice for all of us, regardless if we're pregnant or not. A recent study concluded, “A low GI diet was associated with less frequent insulin use and lower birth weight than control diets, suggesting that it is the most appropriate dietary intervention to be prescribed to patients with GDM [gestational diabetes mellitus].” However, the vast majority of doctors and midwives are not trained nutritionists, dieticians Continue reading >>

Polyphagia - Increased Appetite

Polyphagia - Increased Appetite

Tweet Polyphagia is the medical term used to describe excessive hunger or increased appetite and is one of the 3 main signs of diabetes. An increase in hunger is usually a response to normal things such as intensive exercise or other strenuous activity, but polyphagia can also be the result of more severe issues such as depression or stress. Also known as hyperphagia, it is one of the three main symptoms of diabetes, along with: Polydipsia (increased thirst) and Polyuria (frequent, excessive urination) Causes of polyphagia Polyphagia can be caused by: Diabetes mellitus Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels) Anxiety Stress Bulimia Binge eating disorder Hyperthyroidism (raised level of thyroid hormone) Premenstrual syndrome Certain prescription drugs such as corticosteroids Some psychiatric conditions Rare medical conditions such as Kleine-Levin Syndrome and Prader-Willi Syndrome Hunger and hyperglycemia In uncontrolled diabetes where blood glucose levels remain abnormally high (hyperglycemia), glucose from the blood cannot enter the cells - due to either a lack of insulin or insulin resistance - so the body can’t convert the food you eat into energy. This lack of energy causes an increase in hunger. Simply eating will not get rid of the hungry feeling of polyphagia in people with uncontrolled diabetes, as this will just add to the already high blood glucose levels. The best way to lower blood glucose levels is to exercise as this can help to stimulate insulin production and reduce blood sugar levels. However, if the hunger persists, you may need to consult your doctor or diabetes health care team. Hunger and hypoglycemia Increased appetite can also be caused by abnormally low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). If blood glucose readings Continue reading >>

I Am Hungry!! - Gestational Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

I Am Hungry!! - Gestational Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. what do you ladies do when you are starving yet you have eaten up all of your carbs and snacks that are allowed? Please don't tell me to eat greens. I just can't do it. A cucumber is not going to fill me up or a bowl of lettuce!! I have an hour until lunch and my stomach is growling. Not fun while pregnant. I have been hungry all day, since I got up. Okay I am not pregnant, but NUTS! Olives! Cheeeese! Hard-boiled eggs. what do you ladies do when you are starving yet you have eaten up all of your carbs and snacks that are allowed? Please don't tell me to eat greens. I just can't do it. A cucumber is not going to fill me up or a bowl of lettuce!! I have an hour until lunch and my stomach is growling. Not fun while pregnant. I have been hungry all day, since I got up. Seriously, they do give me something to "crunch" when I get that nagging hungry feeling. yep cheese. i ate so much of that in the first trimester it was sickening! also, sunflower seeds. ate LOTS of them, and believe it or not they are FILLING. also try this, it's so good and it's filling. can of tuna, drained (mayo optional, i didn't add mayo). chopped tomato (and celery for crunch if you like) mix and eat. SOOOO good. very filling. healthy. no carbs. etc. you can do the same sort of thing with canned chicken and cream cheese. very good. also try some chicken stock. add some hot sauce or soy/worsteschire (sp?) and sip away! it's tough, eh? i was hungry and nauseous constantly for the first 13 weeks. what do you ladies do when you are starving yet you have eaten up all of your carbs and snacks that are allowed? Please don't tell me Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

Hungry Between Meals

Hungry Between Meals

I am allowed 15 carbs per snack. But, I am still hungry and it isn't time for my next meal yet :(. Suggestions? I usually have some cheese. You could also have eggs, meat, or other food that doesn't have carbs. If you test after snacks, eating protein will change your number but it won't make it higher. I carry a bag of mixed nuts or cheese for when I'm still hungry. You can eat lots of both and it won't trigger high bg When in doubt, I add some peanut butter. You could also add a pickle, some meat, a veggie and some ranch. My doctor told me 15-30 per snack was good. Have you tried upping it just a little and then seeing if your BS is too high? Try cheese and meat! Or add more protien to your snacks :) I feel like my snacks are the size of a meal (not carb wise obviously) sometimes cuz I wanna make sure I'm full, I'll eat whatever I'm aloud in carbs and then add some veggies, meat and cheese in lol. Thanks for the ideas, ladies :). I need to increase my carb count some and/or just eat more. I don't meet with the dietician until Wednesday. So I have been trying to do my best, but I have been feeling like I am STARVING all the time. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Topic Overview

Gestational Diabetes - Topic Overview

If your blood sugar level first becomes too high when you are pregnant, you have gestational diabetes. It usually goes back to normal after the baby is born. High blood sugar can cause problems for you and your baby. Your baby may grow too large, which can cause problems during delivery. Your baby may also be born with low blood sugar. But with treatment, most women who have gestational diabetes are able to control their blood sugar and give birth to healthy babies. Women who have had gestational diabetes are more likely than other women to develop type 2 diabetes later on. You may be able to prevent or reduce the severity of type 2 diabetes by staying at a healthy weight, eating healthy foods, and increasing your physical activity. The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps your body properly use and store the sugar from the food you eat. This keeps your blood sugar level in a target range. When you are pregnant, the placenta makes hormones that can make it harder for insulin to work. This is called insulin resistance. A pregnant woman can get diabetes when her pancreas cannot make enough insulin to keep her blood sugar levels within a target range. Because gestational diabetes may not cause symptoms, it is important for you to be tested for gestational diabetes. Sometimes a pregnant woman who has symptoms has been living with another type of diabetes without knowing it. If you have symptoms from another type of diabetes, they may include: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Pregnancy causes most women to urinate more often and to feel more hungry. So having these symptoms doesn't always mean that a woman has diabetes. Talk with your doctor if you have these symptoms, so that you can be tested for diabetes at any time during pregnancy. Most women are Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

Food, Family And Diabetes: Eating When You're Not Hungry

Food, Family And Diabetes: Eating When You're Not Hungry

Food, family and diabetes: eating when you're not hungry Food, family and diabetes: eating when you're not hungry In this new series about the psychology of food and eating, Dr Jen Nash explains the habit of eating when youre not hungry and offers practical ways to deal with it. How often do you eat when youre not really hungry? One minute your hands in the biscuit tin, the next that biscuits found its way into your mouth. Sound familiar? Weve all been there! This is called mindless eating when youre eating because your mind is somewhere else and for a reason other than hunger. The food was there and you picked it up automatically and unconsciously, or because you wanted a distraction or break. We all eat mindlessly for non-hunger reasons this is natural and very human. The difficulty, when we want to manage our diabetes more carefully or are struggling to lose weight, is that mindless eating may occur more often than we would like. Traditional weight-loss advice often focuses on changing the what and how much were eating, but a psychological approach encourages us also notice why we are eating. It involves becoming aware of the times we are eating and asking ourselves: Is food what I really need right now? Given that mindless eating is unconscious, this is easier said than done. So heres a three step WHY process to help you. This first step is all about pausing before you eat, which is not as easy as it sounds because its often an unconscious act. In the short term, you may need to use a symbolic prompt on your dominant hand or wrist usually the hand you write with and the one you use to reach for food. Some ideas or reminders include: moving your watch so its on your dominant wrist wearing a charity band, elastic band or hair band Anything that acts as a trigger when Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Hungry

Gestational Diabetes And Hungry

Home / Community / Resources & Links / Gestational Diabetes and HUNGRY Gestational Diabetes and HUNGRY You, ME, and da baby!! Due August 19 ; New Hampshire 14 posts OK ladies so It's official I was diagnosed with GD. I was given ameter and a "meal plan" Simple right? count carbs check blood..ok well i'm still hungry after I eat my 225*300carbs a day. Did I miss something? Any meal ideas( all six)? user banned Shreveport, Louisiana 66739 posts my cousin had diabetes and there are tons on 0 carbs food pincklady 4 kids; Quebec 3889 posts You, ME, and da baby!! Due August 19 ; New Hampshire 14 posts Thank you for the replies..but do you have any ideas for meals? I feel like I eat the amount of carbs I can have at that meal and I am hungry again in an hour. They say to keep to the plan but don't skip meals(go hungry) well I'm hungry and I'm afraid thats goona hurt the baby more. Anyone have to same issue? My doc didnt really give me any actual like recipes just charts with how many carbs..IDK very frustrated Kaylee+Kaelin'sMommy Due June 2 ; 2 kids; Cleveland, Tennessee 1314 posts they just put me on a meal plan too, and I am in the same boat it sucks, and my sugars arent even high, so I would love to know something too!!! They did mine as a precaution because I am borderline, but who on God's green earth can only drink 1/3 cup of apple juice or eat 1oz hamburger meat??? Darcy H 1 child; Oregon 212 posts Kaylee+Kaelin'sMommy Due June 2 ; 2 kids; Cleveland, Tennessee 1314 posts no this is my second baby, I have a daughter who will be 2 in november and i gained almost 60 lbs with her with this one I have only gained 16 lbs and my limit is 25. they aren't worried about the weight gain and my doctor said my sugar isnt that bad like you said i do believe it is just a crazy midwi Continue reading >>

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