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Does Diabetes Cause Belly Fat

Excess Belly Fat Linked To Diabetes, Heart Disease

Excess Belly Fat Linked To Diabetes, Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 -- Gene variants that raise a person's odds of being "apple-shaped" may be linked to heightened risks of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a large study suggests. Many previous studies have hinted that a large waistline can be particularly unhealthy, compared to carrying your weight around the hips and thighs ("pear-shaped"). This new research suggests that people who carry weight at the belly tend to have higher rates of diabetes and heart disease. These types of studies do not prove a cause-and-effect link, said Dr. Kirk Knowlton, director of cardiovascular research at Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. But, the new findings "go a step further," said Knowlton, who was not involved in the study. The new findings give "considerably more weight" to the evidence that excess belly fat, by itself, contributes to diabetes and heart disease, he said. That's because study took a different approach to the question: Researchers looked at whether gene variants that predispose people to abdominal obesity were also tied to the risks of diabetes and heart disease -- and whether that seemed to be independent of other factors, such as overall body weight. That was, in fact, the case. The findings were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. George Davey Smith, of the University of Bristol in England, wrote an editorial that accompanied the study. "This study suggests waist-hip ratio influences diseases outcome," Smith said, "and that this is independent of body mass index." The findings do not prove that shedding belly fat would cut a person's risk of diabetes or heart disease, Smith pointed out. But, he said, they do suggest it would. For the study, researchers at Harvard University and Massachuset Continue reading >>

Belly Fat Could Be An Indicator Of This Deadly Condition - Dubbed New 'silent Killer'

Belly Fat Could Be An Indicator Of This Deadly Condition - Dubbed New 'silent Killer'

The condition, a cluster of three or more risk factors which include abdominal obesity - fat around the middle, high blood pressure, and diabetes, affect one in four adults in the UK. Previously, doctors looked at each of the risk factors on their own. On their own, diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity damage blood vessels, but having all three together is particularly dangerous, researchers have warned. Scientists have said the metabolic syndrome is both under diagnosed and under treated. Belly fat is known by a number of names - spare tyre or love handles - but having fat around the waist points to one thing, medics argue, and that is visceral fat. This collects around organs like the liver, pancreas and intestines and leads to insulin resistance. Professor Dawn Sherling said waist circumference is a ‘strong predictors of metabolic syndrome’ even if you remove body mass index from the equation. "There are patients who have a normal body mass index yet are at high risk,” she said. “These patients represent an important population for clinicians to screen for metabolic syndrome." Professor Charles Hennekens, of Florida Atlantic University, said: "The major factor accelerating the pathway to metabolic syndrome is overweight and obesity. "Obesity is overtaking smoking as the leading avoidable cause of premature death in the US and worldwide." For optimal health, the waist should measure less than 40 inches for men and 35 inches for women. The researchers said metabolic syndrome is a 'silent killer' because it is largely without symptoms. But those affected are almost as likely to suffer a stroke or heart attack over the next ten years as a patient who has already had one, according to a standard health measure known as the Framingham Risk Score. The researche Continue reading >>

Dr. Oz: Diabetes Fight Starts With Belly Fat

Dr. Oz: Diabetes Fight Starts With Belly Fat

Almost everyone knows someone who has diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, an estimated 23.6 million people in the United States -- or 7.8 percent of the population -- have diabetes, a serious, lifelong condition. It is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. Diabetes is also associated with long-term complications that affect almost every part of the body. The disease often leads to blindness, heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputations, and nerve damage. Diabetes is also on the rise in kids, as a result of obesity. Dr. Mehmet Oz, host of Fox Network's "The Dr. Oz Show," is passionate about this public health crisis. He appeared on "The Early Show" Wednesday from Washington, D.C., where he is the keynote speaker at the National Conference on Diabetes. Dr. Oz said he estimates that 57 million more people than the American Diabetes Association statistics include are likely to have diabetes or be pre-diabetic. Oz said, "The irony is the earlier you intervene and help folks, the better they'll do. It'll double the survival rates, but 90 percent of people don't realize it." So how do you know if you have diabetes? Oz said thirst, excess urination and weakness are factors, but another big factor is belly fat. "Your belly fat is what tells us if you're at high risk for being a Type II diabetic." Oz gave a formula for learning if you're at risk: You take your height in inches and divide that in half. If your waist size is more than half your height, you're at higher risk for developing complications from belly fat. He said the leading complication is diabetes. Oz said the formula works for men, women and children. Oz also suggested these practical ways to combat diabetes: • Include fiber with Breakfast - "Everyone knows bre Continue reading >>

Make This Mango Leaf Tea In 5 Minutes To Fight Belly Fat And Type Ii Diabetes

Make This Mango Leaf Tea In 5 Minutes To Fight Belly Fat And Type Ii Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common illnesses facing Americans today, and the number of people suffering from it is growing. Almost 30 million people living in the United States are suffering from diabetes, with over 8 million of them not aware of their condition. Although there are different types of medication available for people with diabetes, many of them can cause unpleasant side effects that interfere with one’s quality of life. Thankfully, there is a natural solution to diabetes that many people aren’t aware of, and it turns out to be the leaf of a popular fruit that you might already have in your home. Mango Leaves and Diabetes A 2010 study found that the extract from mango leaves proved to be a promising, all-natural treatment for diabetes. This is mainly due to its blood sugar-lowering (hypoglycemic) properties. Researchers tested their hypothesis on animal test subjects that were diagnosed with diabetes. They found that test subjects that were given the mango extract absorbed less glucose through their gastrointestinal tract, which would cause their blood sugar levels to lower. Although the researchers did not include their method of extracting from the mango leaf, they did mention that it was a liquid extraction, meaning that you can make your own version of it right at home! Follow these instructions to make a mango leaf extract (all you need is a glass jar, mango leaves, vodka, a strainer and patience). Luckily, there is a much simpler method which is less potent, but very easy to incorporate into your daily routine: Mango Leaf Tea Ingredients: 3-4 mango leaves Water Directions: To start off, boil three to four mango leaves in a small pot of water. After it is finished boiling, let these leaves sit in the water overnight, to maximize the amount Continue reading >>

Blasted Belly Fat: What You Can Do

Blasted Belly Fat: What You Can Do

As frustrating as it is to carry around that spare tire or suffer from “muffin top” syndrome, you might find some comfort in the fact that a slimmer, trimmer middle is something that everyone strives for, even celebrities (OK, I realize that’s little consolation). But my point is that, whether your goal is to lose weight to improve your health, to look better, or to feel better — or all three — it can be a challenge. Fortunately, there are steps that you can take to whittle your waist somewhat and, perhaps most importantly, lower your risk for a host of health problems. Blasting Away Belly Fat: Here’s How Losing weight can be a challenge, and it seems to be harder for some than others. Plus, depending on how much you want to lose, you may be in it for the long haul. Keep in mind that everyone is different, and what may work for one person may not be the best option for someone else. There really is no magic bullet…yet. And if there were, all of us would have heard of it by now. That being said, last week I mentioned that liposuction (not exactly a feasible option for many people due to the cost) is not a contender for losing visceral fat. So what does work? Here are some possible options: Move it. Yes, you do need to exercise. There’s no way around it. For some people, exercise doesn’t result in actual weight loss (meaning, the scale may not budge), but it can and does shrink visceral fat. Even if you haven’t gained weight, you may notice that fat redistributes itself and tends to settle around your middle. This is especially true of women who have gone through menopause. A study done at Duke University showed that men and women who did no exercise for six months increased their visceral fat by 9%; those who exercised regularly decreased their viscer Continue reading >>

The Risks Of Belly Fat -- And How To Beat Them

The Risks Of Belly Fat -- And How To Beat Them

In the late 1990s, Ginger Moore was at a health crossroads. Like many others in their early 40s, she’d packed on some extra pounds around the middle. She’s the first to admit that she ate “for all the wrong reasons.” The biggest one: “to comfort myself emotionally after a bad day.” But her experience with her parents was enough to tell her that she, too, was on the road to heart disease and diabetes. Moore was beginning to worry about what might be ahead for her. Even though she wasn’t seriously overweight, when she read in the local paper about a diabetes prevention clinic, she decided to check it out. She found out she was prediabetic, and there was a good chance she’d get diabetes within the next 10 years. That’s when she decided to lose her “spare tire.” What she didn’t know at the time was that not only would she be staving off diabetes and heart disease, she could also lower her odds of some types of cancer. The fat that lies just below your skin in most of your body -- the kind you can grab with your hands -- is called subcutaneous fat. In your belly, it’s called visceral fat because it builds up in the spaces between and around your viscera -- internal organs like your stomach and intestines. This visceral fat in your middle makes toxins that affect the way your body works, says Samuel Dagogo-Jack, MD, president of the American Diabetes Association. Among them are chemicals called cytokines that boost your chances of heart disease and make your body less sensitive to insulin, which can bring on diabetes. Cytokines also cause inflammation, which can lead to certain cancers, says Eric Jacobs, PhD, a researcher at the American Cancer Society. In recent years, he says, scientists have uncovered links between belly fat and cancers of the col Continue reading >>

Blasted Belly Fat: Types Of Fat

Blasted Belly Fat: Types Of Fat

It’s no secret that having excess fat anywhere in the body isn’t so healthy. When’s the last time you took a good long look at your body in a full-length mirror? If you’re like many people, you probably don’t do this, and if you do, you might quickly glance away. Yes, Americans are overweight and obese. In fact, just a couple of weeks ago, the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released their annual report, entitled “F As in Fat”, stating that obesity rates in a dozen US states have risen above 30%. To put that in perspective, four years ago, only one US state had an obesity rate above 30%. So yes, being overweight or obese is a growing problem (no pun intended) and unfortunately, there is no one right or easy way to fix it. And no doubt, for those of you who struggle with your weight, you’re likely tired of hearing about obesity statistics and how important it is to reach a healthy weight. It’s hard and it’s discouraging. Saddlebags vs. Spare Tires If it’s any consolation, you might be able to feel a little bit better based on where most of your fat stores are located. Admittedly, you may never be thin and you may never lose those 50 or 100 pounds. But you can still do a lot to stay as healthy as possible and limit your chances of heart disease, high blood pressure, gallbladder disease, and some types of cancer. The type of fat you have also can affect your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Go back to your mirror and take a long hard look. Where is most of your fat located? If you tend to carry your weight more in your hips and thighs (sometimes called “saddlebags” or being a “pear” shape), you can breathe a little sigh of relief. Carrying weight in these areas is what scientists believe to be less “har Continue reading >>

Exercise Alone Can Melt Away Dangerous Belly Fat In Diabetics

Exercise Alone Can Melt Away Dangerous Belly Fat In Diabetics

Just by increasing their physical activity, people with type 2 diabetes can lose fat that accumulates in the liver and abdomen and lower their risk of heart problems. Doctors recommend that people diagnosed with diabetes get regular exercise, since physical activity can keep them at a healthy weight and help organs like the lungs, liver and heart to work at their best. But the details of how breaking a sweat influences the different fat deposits around the body are not so clear. There is increasing evidence, for example, that buildup of fat in the abdomen and deep in organs such as the liver and heart, can be more harmful than fat deposited just under the skin, since the more deeply embedded fat, known as visceral fat, releases hormones and other compounds that can affect how efficiently the body breaks down calories. But because most studies involving exercise also allow volunteers to change their diet, pinpointing how physical activity changes fat depots in the body has been hard to document. To gather more information on this relationship, researchers from Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands turned to detailed MRI images to study 12 middle-aged diabetic patients both before and after they participated in a six month program of moderate-intensity exercise. The volunteers exercised for 3.5 hours to 6 hours a week, and participated in two endurance and two resistance training sessions, finishing up with a 12-day hiking expedition. Throughout the study, however, they were told not to change their diet and eating habits. After the training, the researchers found that the participants’ heart functions remained relatively unchanged, but the second round of MRI scans revealed significant decreases in the volume of fat that surrounded the heart and lungs as Continue reading >>

Belly Fat And Diabetes-how Do You Get Rid Of Both?

Belly Fat And Diabetes-how Do You Get Rid Of Both?

Belly fat and diabetes It’s been researched that belly fat can be the cause of or be related to the cause of coronary heart disease and of course type 2 diabetes. You can either have a pear shape body which is having a narrower waistline and your hips carrying the weight, not your abdomen. This doesn’t necessarily increase your risk of heart disease or diabetes, but you don’t want to worry about diabetes and belly fat. Or you can have an apple shape body which means you have a big waistline, large upper back, wide “butt”, and bigger in your chest area. An apple a day keeps the doctor away, but not this isn’t the case when your body is the apple shape. Fat buildup in the belly area is the worst place in the body to carry this extra weight. Having excess weight in the abdomen is associated with chronic diseases and is not good for your back. Your body becomes insulin resistant when you have belly fat and stress adds to it as well. When you have this shape, you will high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and high blood sugar or low blood sugar. You don’t want to be at increased risk for stroke or heart attack, do you? The answer is no. You also don’t want to be tired all the time either. Let’s talk numbers (BMI) Let’s start with your numbers because that lets you know what point you’re at. It’s like getting on the scale when you need to know your weight. BMI (Body Mass Index) You want to measure the circumference of your waist. So get your tape measure and measure your waistline. Don’t cheat. Get an accurate number! So here are the numbers and you should be aware and concerned if: Men’s waist is more than 37″ Women’s waist is more than 31 1/2″ For men, you want to be concerned and take action if your waist size is over 40″ and for women Continue reading >>

Belly Fat, Skin Tags, Male Facial Hair Growth

Belly Fat, Skin Tags, Male Facial Hair Growth

Q: My doctor says that the belly fat, male facial hair growth and skin tags I have are due to my hormones. What can I do? A: Your doctor is correct and there are a few hormones involved. The main hormone is insulin. When insulin is in excess, it causes an elevation in circulating male hormones (also called androgens). These male hormones - particularly testosterone - can cause male facial hair growth in women, acne, and infertility. Elevated insulin is related to weight gain, high cholesterol and triglycerides (blood fats), diabetes and belly fat. Skin tags are an early symptom of pre-diabetes due to high blood sugar. Thankfully, the secret to normalizing insulin and male hormones just got easier. For the past 25 years, a nutrient called D-chiro-inositol has been involved in over 30 published studies at the Virginia Medical School. Sold as ChirositolTM in Canada, this new nutrient derived from carob is a great supplement for insulin-resistant conditions including metabolic syndrome, Type-2 diabetes, PCOS, and excess androgen-related conditions like acne and male facial hair growth in women. It has also been shown to reduce appetite and improve serotonin, our happy hormone. Reduced serotonin or poor metabolism of serotonin is linked to increased sugar cravings. So by balancing serotonin, ChirositolTM also helps control appetite. ChirositolTM mimics insulin activity, thereby helping to control blood glucose levels, glucose storage or disposal of glucose in the cell. And it will not cause low blood sugar in those with normal blood sugar levels. Beyond Chirositol's insulin and blood glucose control benefits, studies show ChirositolTM is beneficial for PCOS, building muscle and weight control. In women with PCOS, weight gain around the hips and thighs, insulin resistance, hi Continue reading >>

Why Getting Rid Of Belly Fat May Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Why Getting Rid Of Belly Fat May Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Belly fat can hamper blood-sugar-regulating organs.IstockphotoExcess weight is probably the number one risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Yes, other factors, such as genes and aging do play a role in type 2 diabetes. But an International Obesity Task Force estimated in 2002 that 60% of diabetes cases around the world were due to weight gain, and in Western nations it was closer to 90%. If you are obese or overweight, you are 90 times as likely to develop type 2 diabetes as someone who is not, according to a review of medical literature published in 2003 by University of Kentucky and other researchers. Why belly fat is so bad And while any excess fat cranks up the risk of diabetes, fat in your midsectionwhich tends to swaddle organs that play a key role in regulating blood sugaris a bigger contributor to risk. "When those fat cells go in and around your belly, not down in your buttocks or your hips, but when it's around the belly … that fat in and of itself works to block the action of insulin, which is necessary to lower the blood sugar," says Gerald Bernstein, MD, director of the diabetes management program at the Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. More about type 2 diabetes Insulin normally triggers the liver to take up extra blood glucose and store the energy for future use. But when the liver is submerged in fat tissue, insulin "can't get the liver to respond," he says. As a result, blood sugar can accumulate in the bloodstream, where it can damage organs all over your body. But even a relatively moderate amount of weight loss and exercise can protect you from diabetes. Next Page: How exercise helps [ pagebreak ]How exercise helps, even if you don't lose weight Regular exercise makes cells more sensitive to insulin, Continue reading >>

Belly Fat In Women: Taking — And Keeping — It Off

Belly Fat In Women: Taking — And Keeping — It Off

What does your waistline say about your health? Find out why belly fat is more common after menopause, the danger it poses — and what to do about it. An expanding waistline is sometimes considered the price of getting older. For women, this can be especially true after menopause, when body fat tends to shift to the abdomen. Yet an increase in belly fat does more than make it hard to zip up your jeans. Research shows that belly fat also carries serious health risks. The good news? The threats posed by belly fat can be reduced. What's behind belly fat Your weight is largely determined by how you balance the calories you eat with the energy you burn. If you eat too much and exercise too little, you're likely to carry excess weight — including belly fat. However, aging also plays a role. Muscle mass might diminish slightly with age, while fat increases. Loss of muscle mass also decreases the rate at which your body uses calories, which can make it more challenging to maintain a healthy weight. Many women also notice an increase in belly fat as they get older — even if they aren't gaining weight. This is likely due to a decreasing level of estrogen, which appears to influence where fat is distributed in the body. The tendency to gain or carry weight around the waist — and have an "apple" rather than a "pear" shape — might have a genetic component as well. Why belly fat is more than skin deep The trouble with belly fat is that it's not limited to the extra layer of padding located just below the skin (subcutaneous fat). It also includes visceral fat — which lies deep inside your abdomen, surrounding your internal organs. Although subcutaneous fat poses cosmetic concerns, visceral fat is linked with far more dangerous health problems, including: Heart disease Type Continue reading >>

Lose Weight & Burn Belly Fat: The Weight Loss Solution

Lose Weight & Burn Belly Fat: The Weight Loss Solution

Obesity has reached epidemic levels in our country and around the world. We are fat and getting fatter for 7 majorreasons: 1. Addiction: We love junk food, fast food, and processed food because of the taste, convenience, and low cost. We can't stop eating this food even though we know it's bad for us -- because of the addictive chemicals in the food. It's convenient to just pick up some KFC or stop by McDonald's for a hamburger, some fries, and a diet soda. Most habits are driven by the addictive chemicals that food manufacturers put in fast foods and processed foods so that we will develop cravings for these foods and return to buy more of these foods (even though we know these foods are bad for us). Please Note: Most food cravings are due to hormonal imbalances and nutrient deficiencies. 2. Habits: We have learned many of our poor eating habits from our parents; and, now we are passing our poor eating habits down to our children and our children's children. That's why it appears that diseases such as Type 2 diabetes and obesity runs in families. Most habits are driven by stress, laziness and the addictive chemicals that food manufacturers put in fast foods and processed foods so that we will return to buy more of their food. These habits also affect the balance of key hormones including insulin, cortisol, progesterone, estrogen, testosterone, and leptin. 3. Knowledge: We lack the understanding of real nutrition and the super foods; and, how "real food" can help us physically, emotionally, and spiritually. We falsely believe that eating healthy is boring, time-consuming, and expensive and that vegetables taste nasty -- these are just excuses or due to the lack of knowledge. 4. Laziness: We don't like to exercise or walk anywhere; plus, we don't like to take the time to Continue reading >>

Skipping Meals Makes You Gain Weight: Fasting Causes Belly Fat And Increases The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Skipping Meals Makes You Gain Weight: Fasting Causes Belly Fat And Increases The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

In an effort to squeeze into an super slinky dress, many of us decide to skip a meal or two. But going without breakfast, lunch or dinner can actually make you gain weight, a study has found. Fasting sets off a host of processes in the body which trigger fat to be stored around the middle. This type of fat is dangerous and increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, researchers warned. They discovered that going without food causes the liver cells to stop responding to insulin - the hormone that breaks down sugar. The liver normally produces glucose to be used by the body, such as when someone is asleep . But stops this production when it detects insulin in the blood, such as when someone has eaten. If it becomes resistant to insulin, it doesn't get the signal to stop producing glucose - and keeps pumping it into the blood. This excess glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream is stored in the body as fat. It also damages organs and can trigger type 2 diabetes over time. The findings suggest eating small meals often could help with weight loss, researchers said. In the study, they fed one group of mice all of their food as a single meal, so the rodents fasted for the rest of the day. Another group of mice were freely allowed to nibble all day long. The mice fed just one meal developed insulin resistance, which scientists consider a tell-tale sign of pre-diabetes. This is a condition in which levels of glucose in the blood are abnormally high, which can lead to type 2 diabetes over time. Initially, the mice fed one meal a day lost weight compared to the mice that had unlimited access to food. For three days, these mice received half of the calories that were consumed daily by the mice whose diet was unrestricted. Food was gradually added so that by day six, all mic Continue reading >>

Abdominal Fat: Does It Predict The Development Of Type 2 Diabetes?1,2

Abdominal Fat: Does It Predict The Development Of Type 2 Diabetes?1,2

The incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is rapidly increasing worldwide. There is a great deal of evidence that both genetic and environmental factors are of importance in the pathogenesis of T2DM. Whereas the genetic factors are still poorly understood, numerous studies have shown that obesity (in particular, central obesity), physical inactivity, a high-fat diet, and a diet rich in saturated fatty acids increase the risk of diabetes (1). T2DM is increasingly common among young people and even children; it constitutes a major health problem in both developed and developing countries; and, with obesity, it is becoming one of the largest challenges to health care systems. Therefore, any measures that could prevent or delay the development of diabetes are urgently needed. In this issue of the Journal, the report by Bray et al (2) tries to answer the question of whether preferential abdominal fat accumulation could predict the development of T2DM in US adults with elevated fasting and postprandial glycemia. The role of abdominal obesity in the development of T2DM is controversial (3). Several studies have shown the association among abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia (3). Visceral fat (VF) is increased in proportion to body mass index (BMI) (4), and obesity is one of the main risk factors for the development of T2DM (1). Moreover, visceral adipocytes release an excess amount of free fatty acids (FFAs) and are very resistant to the antilipolytic effect of insulin (3). Several lines of evidence support the concept that FFAs are important regulators of glucose metabolism and that elevated FFAs are associated with insulin resistance at the level of liver and muscle (5). Thus, to explain the association between VF and hepatic insulin resistance, it has b Continue reading >>

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