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Does Crystal Light Spike Insulin

Healthy Flavoring For Water? Crystal Light?

Healthy Flavoring For Water? Crystal Light?

Healthy Flavoring For Water? Crystal Light? After my post, Water Is Not Water Anymore , a lot of questions have bee asked about Crystal Light and what to use in your water if all those things were so bad, and if there was anything out there to use in other drinks as well. Well, I think I found a solution! First, the topic of Crystal Light. Ads for Crystal Light low-calorie powdered drink mixes say that "Women who use Crystal Light drink 20 percent more water." But what else are you getting with that water? Somevarieties of Crystal Light are vitamin-fortified: the "Enhanced" formulas, for instance, contain mixes of small quantities of caffeine, vitamins A, C, E, B6 and B12 to promote, variously, "Energy," "Immunity," or "Hydration." The "Sunrise" series provides 100 percent of the DV for Vitamin C and 10 percent of the DV for calcium. A "Skin Essentials" line promises to "nourish your skin from within" with vitamins A, C and E plus a "plant extract containing lutein and xeaxanthin." (These last two are thought to help combat macular degeneration, an eye condition, but aren't established as helping the skin in any particular way.) I'm all for vitamins and minerals, but I'd just as soon get mine from whole fruits, vegetables and other real foods. And don't be fooled by the names of Crystal Light products: there's nary a pomegranate, strawberry or mango in the bunch. But my real gripe with Crystal Light is that, despite the Web site's admirable provision of information about the importance of keeping your body hydrated and water's effect on your health, their products depend for their low calorie content on two artificial sweeteners that I just don't trust: aspartame and acesulfame potassium. The Center for Science in the Public Interest maintains a list of food additives Continue reading >>

Could Artificial Sweeteners Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Could Artificial Sweeteners Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Sept. 17, 2014 -- If you’re one of the millions of Americans for whom diet sodas and artificially sweetened desserts play leading roles in efforts to shed pounds and help prevent long-term diseases like diabetes, new research might give you pause. The work, done with mice and humans, suggests that artificial sweeteners could raise your blood sugar levels more than if you indulged in sugar-sweetened sodas and desserts. Blame it on the bugs in your gut, scientists say. They found that saccharin (a.k.a. Sweet‘N Low), sucralose (a.k.a. Splenda) and aspartame (a.k.a. NutraSweet and Equal) raised blood sugar levels by dramatically changing the makeup of the gut microorganisms, mainly bacteria, that are in the intestines and help with nutrition and the immune system. There are trillions of them -- many times more than the cells of the body -- and they account for roughly 4 pounds of your body weight. Scientists in recent years have focused more and more on the link between the gut microorganisms and health. In the latest research, “what we are seeing in humans and also in mice is this previously unappreciated correlation between artificial sweetener use” and microorganisms in the gut, said Eran Elinav, MD, one of the scientists involved in the new study. Elinav and a collaborator, Eran Segal, PhD, spoke at a press conference held by Nature, the journal that published their team’s findings. Both of the scientists are on the faculty of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. “Initially, we were surprised by the results, which is why we also repeated them multiple times,” Segal said. Industry groups said the small number of mice and people studied make the findings hard to apply to larger populations. But one scientist not involved in the research called the sm Continue reading >>

Crystal Light - Bodybuilding.com Forums

Crystal Light - Bodybuilding.com Forums

I heave heard about how it contains aspartame that may lead to store fat and is counterproductive for losing weight. Does anyone have factual evidence on this? My diet is spot on and but I drink crystal light, I have a hard time drinking my required daily amount of water so I use Crystal Light as a means of increasing water cnsumption, what do you guys think? I heave heard about how it contains aspartame that may lead to store fat and is counterproductive for losing weight. Does anyone have factual evidence on this? My diet is spot on and but I drink crystal light, I have a hard time drinking my required daily amount of water so I use Crystal Light as a means of increasing water cnsumption, what do you guys think? I'm down a pant size (6 weeks into my cut) while drinking tremendous amounts of similar products. But I do track the 5 calories per serving on my daily intake. I highly recommend the Ocean Spray White Cran Peach drinks I'm addicted to it!! Once I start drinking it, I cannot stop until it's all gone. Check the labels also-some like the plain tea contains corn syrup solids (powdered not bottled). I stalled for a month in my weight loss and started reading labels and discovered this. I was drinking a lot of it and stopping and switching to plain water helped break my stall. ***"Fibro & lifting = "I still hurt but I hurt better"*** Location: Kings Park, New York, United States Why Does Drinking Diet Soda Make You Gain Weight? Here are a few reasons for diet soda - weight gain: Calorie Deficit: Experts say that our brain has a link between the taste and calories. So, when you eat a sugary food, the brain expects the calories to come along with it. When the body does not get the calories along with the diet soda ?you tend to overeat to compensate the calories. Incr Continue reading >>

Any Issues With Crystal Light?

Any Issues With Crystal Light?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. My son sipped on crystal light all day and his sugars were much higher than usual. I had to give him a few corrections throughout the day. Double checked and the labels say sugar free and carb free. 0 grams on both. Just curious if maybe it is the crystal light or something else. My son sipped on crystal light all day and his sugars were much higher than usual. I had to give him a few corrections throughout the day. Double checked and the labels say sugar free and carb free. 0 grams on both. Just curious if maybe it is the crystal light or something else. no issues here either. Could it be a fat spike from something eaten earlier? I have never heard of crystal light raising the blood sugar. I would look for another reason for the higher sugars. If it was one of the iced tea flavors the caffeine in that could raise the bg. Some people do see a rise from caffeine. My son sipped on crystal light all day and his sugars were much higher than usual. I had to give him a few corrections throughout the day. Double checked and the labels say sugar free and carb free. 0 grams on both. Just curious if maybe it is the crystal light or something else. Crystal light has maltodextrin which is a sweetener made from corn. It could be possible that it is that which raised your son's blood sugar. I know it does for me even though it shouldn't. Of course I am one of those weird ones LOL. I know they can say sugar free and carb free and still have a certain percentage of carbs and sugars within the ingredients as long as it is below a certain amount. I just saw an ad for Crystal Light Pure .. no artificial sweetener ... anyone seen it? Maybe that would help the blood sugars I just saw Continue reading >>

Maltodextrin Spikes Insulin?

Maltodextrin Spikes Insulin?

hey guys, i was reading in Flex magazine that maltodextrin (found in numerous sugar free foods) is low-molecular-weight carbohydrates produced by the hydrolysis of starch...they stated that this is basically a "trick" they use however it may spike insulin...now the foods are not my problem but i am a huge fan of crystal light since downing water has become a bore...just wondering if im inquiring on an unknown fact and should be kicking it or not worry about it Maltodextrin has a GI similar to dextrose, so yes it will spike insulin levels. so should i be kicking it if i want 2 lose weight? i am slightly confused as to what your asking, but im going to enlighten some areas of your post... maybe this helps. maltodextrin is, simply put, a sweetener. bodybuilders use maltodextrin to create an insulin spike post-workout. this is done in conjunction with protein in a PWO shake. the insulin spike caused by the sweetener (maltodextrin in this case) force feeds your muscles protein when they are simultaneously consumed. it basically forces protein into your muscles. insulin levels are important because too low of an insulin level then you're body becomes catabolic and will metabolize your muscle (cortisol levels rise when insulin is too low). when you cause your insulin level to get too high, it may trigger unwanted fat storage. so, like all things, we use it sparingly to keep a balance. its best not to consume a sweetener all day, but possibly a small amount in the morning to combat cortisol spikes when you wake up (it happens, your body has risen from a fast...) and immediately after your weight-training session. Get used to me. Determined, confident, cocky. My name, not yours; my beliefs, not yours; my goals, my own. so should i be kicking it if i want 2 lose weight? Some peo Continue reading >>

Splenda Crystal Light | Diabetic Connect

Splenda Crystal Light | Diabetic Connect

Stevia is good, Truvia, that seems to be the safe one. I avoid aspartame and use very little Splenda, rarely. I drink Crystal Light "Pure" it does not have aspartame or splenda in it, it has I think stevia or something like that, it is considered safe. They are so good, comes in so many different flavors. I also like to use my juice and get lemon juice in my water most days, they say that has many health benefits. I use whole wheat flour also. Can use whole wheat flour for a healthier flour choice and not sure if this was mentioned but there is an all natural or minimum processed sweeter called truvia. Haven't used it yet splenda has been good to me so far Sugar subs can trigger all kinds of responses in people, I cant drink Crystal light because it gives me indigestion. I know its the Crystal Light because when I stopped drinking it..the indigestion stopped too. Some one with constant indigestion needs to see his MDI use the reduced sugar cake mixes and always make cup cakes ( to limit my portions ) and put them in the freezer. One mix can last for several weeks if its just me. If I bake from scratch I reduce the sugar by half or 2/3s if it contains fruit like banana muffins or blueberry muffins. It took some time but I am use to the lower sugar contentOf course in my mind the flour is just as bad as the sugar. Check the carbs. Drinks have hidden carbs. If he drinks 8 oz cans and it says 0 carbs, find out how many are in 16 oz. it may be one but if he drinks it all day long, that adds up fast. I enjoy a sugar free treat once in a while , I have found I can handle only once or twice a wk, I to have tummy issues if I indulge more then once or twice weekly, I mostly drink water can't stand soda anymore taste funny to me, so I think it's ok to treat ourselves from time to Continue reading >>

Crystal Light Side Effects

Crystal Light Side Effects

Crystal Light is the brand name for a series of product lines marketed by Kraft Foods. All Crystal Light products are artificially sweetened; some are powdered for reconstitution with water and others are prepared beverages. Kraft uses three artificial sweeteners for the Crystal Light line: aspartame, sucralose and stevia. Each offers specific beverage-enhancing attributes and its own spectrum of benefits and side effects. Video of the Day According to a 2002 report from Penn State University, headaches, chronic fatigue syndrome, epilepsy, fibromyalgia and bi-polar disorder have been blamed on aspartame. But well-controlled, clinical research consistently fails to verify these isolated reports. Researchers reporting from the Clinical Research Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1998, said that aspartame, a relatively new sweetener to the general public at that time, was safe. Later claims that aspartame caused brain or any other tumors, were refuted by scientists at The Mayo Clinic in 2008, who also cited agreement by National Cancer Institute scientists. They also cite the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the FDA, as recommending that safe use of aspartame amounts to 50 mg/kg, of body weight. Safe use is defined as 1/100th of an amount that might cause illness. Aspartame is not safe for people with a rare genetic disorder called phenylketonuria, or PKU. Any product containing aspartame is required by the FDA to display a PKU warning label. According to Genevieve Frank, reporting in a 2002 edition of Penn State University's "Undergraduate Research Journal," scientifically documented side effects of Crystal Light's sucralose are unknown. A person would have to drink 450, 12-oz. portions of a sucralose-sweetened beverage in a day to reach a dose equal Continue reading >>

Is Crystal Light A Safe Drink?

Is Crystal Light A Safe Drink?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I really like the flavors of this drink, but not real sure if it's safe to drink. I posted the ingredients below. Could someone tell me if it contains any sweeteners that would raise BS? Ingredients: CITRIC ACID (PROVIDES TARTNESS), CALCIUM CITRATE, MALTODEXTRIN, MALIC ACID, ASPARTAME (SWEETENER), ASCORBIC ACID (VITAMIN C), MAGNESIUM OXIDE (PREVENTS CAKING), CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR, ACESULFAME POTASSIUM (SWEETENER), SOY LECITHIN, ARTIFICIAL COLOR, YELLOW 5, RED 40, BLUE 1. I drink several Crystal Light and other generic sugar free water add-ins daily without problem. Have for many years now. Definately a no no for me. It has more than five ingredients, comes in a sealed package, has unpronounceable ingredients, and contains aspartame - a nasty. It's not food. I drink it all the time - its the closets to "purple drink" I can get without drinking the real deal. Walmart brand has an apple flavored drink that tasts very close to real apple juice. I have it with my b/fast many mornings...just like I used to do with regular apple juice. Its my favorite add-in so far. Walmart brand has an apple flavored drink that tasts very close to real apple juice. I have it with my b/fast many mornings...just like I used to do with regular apple juice. Its my favorite add-in so far. I can back Linda up on that!!! Ever since she recommended them, I have been buying 3 boxes every week!! They are the best thats out there. One of the prioblems of being a diabetic is sometimes when you need a sweet fix, anything that is "free" is also what John calls NOT FOOD. I prefer to just not go ov Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Will Crystal Light Raise Blood Sugar? | Yahoo Answers

Will Crystal Light Raise Blood Sugar? | Yahoo Answers

type 1 diabetic i found out diet pop raises blood sugar so just wondering if crysal light will as well Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: The carb count they list on their boxes is zero or 1g, depending on which flavor you have. It does have artificial sweetener in it though--same as diet pop. What you need to do is drink the stuff and then test your blood to see if you get a significant rise from it--with most stuff that's the best way to find out what it will do to you because people are not the same, some people get a high glucose rise from certain artificial sweeteners but not others. Some of us can't use "natural" sweeteners like Stevia and agave. You have to find out what sets you off and what things are ok with your body by testing. I can do Crystal Light (although I don't particularly like using the powdered drink stuff), I prefer Mio (it's about twice as expensive though). Upload failed. Please upload a file larger than 100x100 pixels We are experiencing some problems, please try again. You can only upload files of type PNG, JPG, or JPEG. You can only upload files of type 3GP, 3GPP, MP4, MOV, AVI, MPG, MPEG, or RM. You can only upload photos smaller than 5 MB. You can only upload videos smaller than 600MB. You can only upload a photo (png, jpg, jpeg) or a video (3gp, 3gpp, mp4, mov, avi, mpg, mpeg, rm). Video should be smaller than 600mb/5 minutes Video should be smaller than 600mb/5 minutes Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And Insulin Spike

Artificial Sweeteners And Insulin Spike

Artificial Sweeteners and Insulin Spike , 05-28-2009 06:27 PM Hi all. I think I have a simple question here (maybe?). If I understand it correctly, insulin is produced in response to high blood glucose resulting in conversion/storage to fat. If artificial sweeteners signal the "appearance" of high glucose, thus causing an insulin spike, the net result should be lowered blood glucose, right? So one could determine if they are susceptive to such spikes by monitoring whether blood glucose decreased after ingesting artificial sweeteners? RE: Artificial Sweeteners and Insulin Spike , 05-28-2009 06:32 PM I dont think so. As a diabetic I would drink the whatever with the artifical sweetner in it after testing my blood sugar. Then 2 hrs later test again. And not eat anything else. It should stay the same or even go down after a 2 hr stretch w/out food. If it is up then absolutely I would call the AS the culprit. The idea is to keep insulin FROM being activated as much as possible.Then your body uses the fuel as fuel if you are eating correctly. IE Low-Carb RE: Artificial Sweeteners and Insulin Spike , 05-28-2009 07:07 PM Actually I think the original poster is right. If an artificial sweetener, without maltodextrin, dextrose, or sugar alcohols, is causing an insulin response, then blood sugar should be lower, and it should be lower fairly quickly, within a few minutes of finishing the drink, I would think. RE: Artificial Sweeteners and Insulin Spike , 05-28-2009 07:50 PM ..........except that the pancreas responds with insulin for two purposes: When storing excess blood glucose, the beta cells respond to blood glucose directly .....or to an artificial sweetener mimicking glucose. When responding to anaerobic exertion, pancreas nerves monitor blood endorphin ........or an inges Continue reading >>

Does Acesulfame K Spike Insulin?

Does Acesulfame K Spike Insulin?

If you’re following a low-carb diet, or a diet with low-carb periods, like Carb Backloading or Intermittent Fasting, then you probably drink diet sodas. They’re a convenient, tasty alternative to water, coffee, and tea. And, more importantly, you can enjoy the sweet taste without worrying about the insulin spike that you’d get from a sugary drink. Or can you? If you’ve done research on Carb Backloading, then you’ll be aware that Acesulfame K (Ace K) is forbidden because it spikes insulin. But does it really? We love Kiefer, so let’s take a quote from part of an interview series with Sean Hyson: Sean: Going back to sweeteners, you make a point in the book about acesulfame potassium raising insulin levels. I noticed that Coke Zero has a small amount of it, but not Diet Coke. Based on that, would you say that Coke Zero could therefore possibly spike insulin and is a bad diet soda choice? Kiefer: Yeah, I would go with the Diet Coke. Acesulfame potassium definitely causes an insulin response. So many factors can influence that so it’s hard to say how intense it is. I have noticed that people who drink a lot of energy drinks that have acesulfame potassium don’t fare nearly as well on Carb Nite until they cut those out. So I would say that the response is significant, even with a small amount. In his Carb Backloading book, Kiefer references three studies. The first study found that infusions of Acesulfame K increased insulin secretion in rats [1]. The second part of that study examined the effects of Acesulfame K on isolated rat pancreatic islets [2]. It found that Acesulfame K had a dose and glucose-dependent effect on insulin secretion; but, most importantly, even without glucose it promoted insulin secretion. The third study found that artificial sweeteners Continue reading >>

Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause An Insulin Spike?

Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause An Insulin Spike?

178 Comments The notion that artificial sweeteners (and sweet tastes in general) might produce an insulin response is one of those murky memes that winds itself around the blogs, but it’s never stated one way or the other with any sort of confidence. I briefly mentioned the possibility of non-caloric sweeteners influencing satiety hormones in last week’s diet soda post, and a number of you guys mentioned the same thing. Still, I’ve never seen unequivocal evidence that this is the case. This whole idea first came to my attention some time ago when my dog Buddha got into a bottle of “alternative sleep assists” which contained, among other things, 5 HTP (version of l-tryptophan) and xylitol (sugar alcohol). Long story short, dogs can’t take xylitol because it causes a spike in insulin, which then severely depletes blood glucose. Buddha got past this with a trip to the vet’s at 10:30 Sunday night (thanks, Dr. Dean). But it occurred to me that the same effect might be seen in humans, which is why I pose the question today… Do artificial sweeteners induce insulin secretion (perhaps via cephalic phase insulin release, which is sort of the body’s preemptive strike against foods that will require insulin to deal with)? One of the reasons a definitive answer is rarely given is that the question is improperly framed. Artificial sweeteners is not a monolithic entity. There are multiple types of sweeteners, all of them chemically distinct from each other. A more useful question would be “What effect does [specific artificial sweetener goes here] have on insulin?” So let’s go around the circle and ask. Does aspartame (aka Equal and Nutrasweet) affect insulin? Aspartame is pretty gross stuff, what with its awful taste and hordes of people who get terrible react Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

Dont Spike Your Blood Sugar!

Dont Spike Your Blood Sugar!

Imagine a diabetic character on TV who suddenly begins to act a little strangely, but is not too confused to murmur, I think my blood sugar is too low. Everyone on screen runs for something sugary that the character will absorb quickly. Orange juice, or maybe Coke. Sweet drinks like juices and sodas, with up to 12 (!) teaspoons of sugar per can, are great for spiking your blood sugar. None for me, thanks. Heres what I found in the beverage center at our local Walmart. I especially wanted to look at product names, because the more creative the brand name, the more highly manufactured it is likely to be. There was Sunny D, Powerade, Gatorade (11 flavors), Juicy Juice, Country Time, Tahitian Treat, Hawaiian Punch (many flavors), Propel vitamin enhanced water beverage mix (raspberry lemonade naturally and artificially flavored, and berry naturally flavored), and Dasani Natural Lemon Flavored Water Beverage. V8 Splash (not V8 tomato juice) was available in mango peach, fruit medley, berry blend, and tropical blend, which also had a diet version. Caffeinated or coffee-flavored beverages included Red Bull energy drink (original and sugar free), Monster (regular, mega and lo-carb), Starbucks Frappucino coffee drink in 3 flavors (coffee, mocha, vanilla), and Starbucks doubleshot espresso & cream premium coffee drink (regular and light). Country Time Lemonade Drink Mix is reminiscent of a time when it was easier to get good old-fashioned lemonade. The powder mix was first marketed in 1975 by a TV character named Grandpa. Cans and bottles arrived in 1982. Then came Pink Lemonade (1995), Iced Tea with Lemon (2003), Strawberry Lemonade (2004), and Country Time Light Lemonade (2005). The Strawberry Lemonade is the perfect blend of two favorite flavors: sweet, sun-ripened strawberrie Continue reading >>

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