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Does Coffee Cause Diabetes

Wait, What’s The Deal With Coffee And Diabetes?

Wait, What’s The Deal With Coffee And Diabetes?

Confused about coffee and diabetes? Not sure if your morning coffee is giving you diabetes or preventing it? I’m not surprised. Historically coffee has been deplored as an unhealthy vice. But recently there’ve been some big claims the other side of the spectrum… So should you believe the hype? Can coffee actually play a role in preventing diabetes? In the last ten or so years, there have been many studies (like this and this) looking into the relationship between coffee and diabetes. Most have found the same link: coffee drinking is associated with lower incidence of diabetes! A recent review, which was conducted in 2013, looked at 28 studies, with over one million people – and found strong support for this link. The evidence appears to be consistent across various ethnicities and showed a dose-response relationship, that is, the more coffee people drank, the lower their relative risk of developing diabetes. One study even showed those who decreased their coffee consumption increased their risk of diabetes, while those who increased consumption, decreased their risk! Even though this is a lot of people and many studies, it’s important to note, these were epidemiological studies. So it’s just observational evidence. Epidemi.. What? Epidemiological evidence means that people have conducted studies of large populations of people and found a pattern – or association – between people and a disease. The pattern seen in diabetes is that those who drink coffee seem to have less diabetes. “One Triple Shot Latte to go”? Before you go out and over-caffeinate yourself, let’s break this down. Firstly, what these studies show is just an association, not a cause. That is, not drinking coffee will not cause you to get diabetes, and drinking coffee will not prevent Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes

Coffee And Diabetes

Tweet The effect of coffee on diabetes, when presented in the media can often be confusing. News stories can in the same week tout the benefits coffee can have on diabetes and shoot down coffee as being unhelpful for blood sugar levels. This doesn’t mean the articles are contradictory though. Put slightly more simply, coffee contains different chemicals, some of which have beneficial effects whereas others can have a less beneficial effect, such as caffeine which can impair insulin in the short term. Caffeine and blood sugar levels Regular high caffeine consumption, over a 4 week period, has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. [20] Whilst the researchers found a relationship between higher coffee consumption and lower sensitivity to insulin, they recognised that the rapid transition to having more coffee may have produced an atypical or emphasised response by the body. Benefits of coffee Coffee has been shown to lower risks of the following conditions: Coffee contains polyphenols, which are a molecule that anti-oxidant properties which are widely believed to help prevent inflammatory illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes, and anticarcinogenic (anti-cancer) properties. As well as polyphenols, coffee contains the mineral magnesium and chromium. Greater magnesium intake has been linked with lower rates of type 2 diabetes. The blend of these nutrients can be helpful for improving insulin sensitivity, which may help to offset the opposite effects of caffeine. Coffee and prevention of diabetes Coffee and its effect on risks of developing type 2 diabetes have been studied a number of times and has indicated a notably lower risk of type 2 diabetes being associated with coffee drinkers. A 2009 study of 40,000 participants noted that consumptio Continue reading >>

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

With diabetes, diet is of the utmost concern. What people with diabetes eat and drink directly affects their blood glucose levels. We often concentrate on food, but what people drink is just as important. For many people, the only way to get the day started is with a cup of coffee. Thankfully, recent studies have shown that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk of getting diabetes. But what about for those who already have diabetes? Is coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, a problem for those with diabetes? Two 8-ounce cups of coffee contain about 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young healthy adults, caffeine does not seem to make blood sugar levels higher. Even consuming up to 400 milligrams per day appears to be safe for most people. This article will take a closer look at caffeine and some of the research that has been done in this area. Diabetes and caffeine According to the American Diabetes Association in 2012, 29.1 million Americans or 9.3 percent of the population had diabetes. About 8.1 million of the 29.1 million were undiagnosed. The World Health Organization reported that the number of people with diabetes worldwide in 2014 was 422 million. Diabetes affects how the body uses sugar (glucose). The body needs glucose because it is an important energy source for certain cells and is the brain's main source of fuel. Glucose in the body comes from food and drink as well as being made by the liver. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone in the body and helps the body to absorb glucose. People who have diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, which can cause serious health problems. Diabetes can occur due to either the pancreas not producing no or not enough insulin or the body being unable to use insulin effectively. Type 2 is the most common type Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

The average U.S. adult consumes about two 8-ounce cups (474 milliliters) of coffee a day, which can contain around 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young, healthy adults, caffeine doesn't appear to noticeably affect blood sugar (glucose) levels, and consumption up to 400 milligrams a day appears to be safe. Some studies suggest that drinking coffee, caffeinated and decaffeinated, may actually reduce your risk of developing diabetes. If you already have diabetes, however, the impact of caffeine on insulin action may be associated with higher or lower blood sugar levels. For some people with diabetes, about 200 milligrams of caffeine — or the equivalent of one to two 8-ounce cups (237 to 474 milliliters) of plain, brewed coffee — may cause this effect. Caffeine affects every person differently. If you have diabetes or you're struggling to control your blood sugar levels, limiting the amount of caffeine in your diet may provide a benefit. Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Raise Your Blood Sugar?

In a nutshell, the answer is: yes. But for some, the answer can be: no. For most, explains Gary Scheiner, CDE and author of “Think Like a Pancreas” and “Until There is a Cure,” caffeine does tend to raise blood sugar levels in people with diabetes approximately 1 hour after consuming it. Meanwhile, some people with diabetes seem to have no reaction at all, even to large servings of caffeine. “It does this,” explains Scheiner, “by promoting the breakdown of fat (rather than sugar) for energy and stimulating the liver’s breakdown of glycogen.” Glycogen is a form of stored energy (glucose) in the liver. But Scheiner emphasizes that small amounts of caffeine probably have little to no impact on blood sugar levels. Just how much caffeine are you getting in your favorite beverages or snacks? “Think Like a Pancreas” shares a thorough list of some common caffeine-containing foods: Jolt energy drink: 280 mg Stay-away pills: 100-200 mg Monster energy drink: 160 mg 5-Hour energy drink: 138 mg 8 oz Brewed coffee: 100-120 mg Espresso/Latte: 100 mg Red Bull: 80 mg 8 oz Instant Coffee: 60-80 mg Tea: 30-50 mg Soda: 30-45 mg Chocolate bar: 20-30 mg But this doesn’t mean you have to accept those high blood sugars as a regular part of your morning coffee! Instead, Scheiner shares this advice on page 187 on “Think Like a Pancreas:” If you suspect that caffeine may be causing your blood sugar to rise, either look for a lower-caffeine substitute or take a little extra rapid-acting insulin when consuming high-caffeine foods/beverages. To determine the amount of insulin you need, test your blood sugar and then consume the caffeinated item with no other food (bolus only for the carbs in the caffeinated item). Check your blod sugar again in three hours and then divide Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Navigating what you can and cannot eat and drink when you have type 2 diabetes can be tricky. Of course, there’s the obvious stuff you know is good to cut out or limit in your diet, like processed sweets and other refined carbohydrates, which can cause blood sugar levels to soar when eaten in excess. But what about those murkier diet staples, which seem to straddle the line between healthy and indulgent, but are ingrained in so many of our everyday rituals? For millions of people in various cultures around the world, caffeinated drinks are likely the sort of thing that comes to mind when we talk about food or drinks in a healthy diabetes diet that aren’t so cut-and-dried. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for a while and are seeking better blood sugar control, the subject of caffeine in a diabetes diet is a fair concern. Caffeinated Drinks for Diabetes: Are They Safe? “For people already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, studies have shown caffeine consumption decreases insulin sensitivity and raises blood sugar levels,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, who is based in Hilton Head, South Carolina. According to a review published in April 2017 in Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews, five out of seven trials studied found that caffeine increases blood glucose and keeps levels higher longer. That doesn’t sound good, but if you’re accustomed to having your morning java, don’t skip out on the drink just yet. Some studies suggest that other components of caffeinated coffee may offer some benefits for people with diabetes. In a study published in March 2016 in the International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, researchers looked at coffee consumption in adults with and w Continue reading >>

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Part 1 of 8 Highlights For people without diabetes, coffee may help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Caffeine has been shown in the short term to increase both glucose and insulin levels. Because of this, people with diabetes should be cautious when consuming coffee. Once sweetener is added to coffee, it removes the benefits of diabetes prevention. It can actually increase your risk of developing diabetes. Coffee was once condemned as being bad for your health. However, there’s growing evidence that it may protect against certain kinds of cancers, liver disease, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. There’s also compelling research that increasing your coffee intake may actually lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This is good news for those of us who can’t face the day until we get in our cup of java. However, for those who already have type 2 diabetes, coffee could have adverse effects. Whether you’re trying to lower your risk, you have diabetes, or you just can’t go without your cup of joe, learn about coffee’s effects on diabetes. Part 2 of 8 According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is a disease (or group of diseases) that affects how your body processes blood glucose (sugar). Blood glucose is important because it is what fuels your brain and gives energy to your muscles and tissues. If you have diabetes, that means that you have too much blood glucose circulating in your body and it can cause serious health concerns. There are a number of different factors that can cause diabetes. Chronic diabetes types are type 1 and type 2. Other types include gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but tends to go away after birth. Another is prediabetes, which means your blood glucose levels are higher than usual but not as high as woul Continue reading >>

How Does Caffeine Affect Your Blood Sugar?

How Does Caffeine Affect Your Blood Sugar?

Whether it’s from coffee, tea, soda, or chocolate, most Americans get caffeine every day. For healthy people, it’s usually a harmless perk-me-up. But if you have type 2 diabetes, caffeine may make it harder to keep your blood sugar in check. A growing body of research suggests people with type 2 diabetes react to caffeine differently. It can raise blood sugar and insulin levels for those with the disease. One study looked at people with type 2 diabetes who took a 250-milligram caffeine pill at breakfast and another at lunchtime. That’s about the same amount as drinking two cups of coffee with each meal. The result: Their blood sugar was 8% higher than on days when they didn’t have caffeine. Their reading also jumped by more after each meal. That’s because caffeine can affect how your body responds to insulin, the hormone that allows sugar to enter your cells and get changed into energy. Caffeine may lower your insulin sensitivity. That means your cells don’t react to the hormone by as much as they once did. They don’t absorb as much sugar from your blood after you eat or drink. This causes your body to make more insulin, so you have higher levels after meals. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body already doesn’t use insulin well. After meals, your blood sugar rises higher than normal. Caffeine may make it tougher to bring it down to a healthy point. This may lead to too-high blood sugar levels. Over time, this may raise your chance of diabetes complications, like nerve damage or heart disease. Scientists are still learning how caffeine affects your insulin and blood sugar levels. But they think it may work this way: Caffeine raises levels of certain stress hormones, like epinephrine (also called adrenaline). Epinephrine can prevent your cells from proce Continue reading >>

Is Coffee Good For Diabetes?

Is Coffee Good For Diabetes?

Should people with diabetes drink coffee? If you do, should it be decaf or regular? The health effects of coffee have been well studied, but we still have no definite answer. I have to admit — I don’t drink coffee and never have. The closest I get is coffee ice cream. But some of this data has me thinking I should start. • Coffee reduces risk of death. In a study of over 700,000 people done by the University of Southern California, people who drank coffee were 18% less likely to die in the next 10–16 years. The study group included people of various races and ethnic groups. • Coffee is linked with lower risk of stroke. Since stroke is a major complication of diabetes, lowering your risk seems like a good idea. • Studies indicate that coffee lowers risk ofliver and mouth cancer, improves memory, and protects against Type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. • A recent study from India found that coffee drinkers have lower fasting blood sugars. Other studies have found that coffee improves insulin function. It may lower insulin resistance. • Some nutritionists say coffee is a major source of antioxidants, molecules that slow aging and tissue breakdown. Downside of coffee Coffee has some undesirable side effects. The Mayo Clinic states that consuming more than 500–600 milligrams of caffeine a day may lead to “insomnia, nervousness, restlessness, irritability, an upset stomach, a fast heartbeat, and even muscle tremors.” It’s worth noting that 500–600 milligrams a day is a lot (about six cups of coffee or nine ounces of espresso), but some research has linked even moderate amounts of caffeine to bad health effects, according to Medical News Today. Coffee drinking in pregnancy may increase the risk of low-birth-weight babies. Drinking coffee with a Continue reading >>

Coffee, Caffeine And Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee, Caffeine And Type 2 Diabetes

There has been extensive research into whether consuming coffee (caffeine) is safe for those with type 2 diabetes as well as whether or not coffee could help prevent diabetes. With the ever rising population of people suffering with type 2 diabetes, it’s good to hear that the diabetic or potential diabetic has a friend in coffee. A healthy diet, low in sugar and refined carbs, is still the number one dietary measure to treat or reduce the risk for diabetes. Most research shows that coffee can be part of a diet that’s designed to prevent, treat, and/or possibly reverse type 2 diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes and Coffee Research Studies A study published by the American Diabetes Association showed that those who drink coffee have lower sugar and insulin levels. It also appears that regular coffee is better than decaffeinated, so coffee could even prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.15 overweight but otherwise healthy men were given either decaf coffee, a placebo, or the chemicals chlorogenic acid and trigonelline dissolved in water, which are two of the main antioxidants in coffee. The participants’ glucose and insulin levels were checked after consumption of each throughout the trial period. The only sample that showed lowered sugar and insulin levels was the chlorogenic acid and trigonelline solution group. Src. Another study analyzed much the latest research concerning diabetes and coffee consumption and was conducted by Harvard’s Dr. Frank Hu. His team found that the risk of type II diabetes decreased by 9% for each daily cup of coffee consumed. Decaf coffee decreased risk by 6% per cup. Src. An 11 year study looked at the diabetes and coffee risk association in postmenopausal women. They found that women who consumed 6 cups of coffee had a 22% lower risk of develop Continue reading >>

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together. However, a new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for: Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…) Cancer (prostate, breast…) Parkinsons disease According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine: (Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast) What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes). Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups! You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee): Let me pour myself another cup of coffee right now (and according to the coffee and diabetes research, you should grab a coffee yourself) because we’re going to see: Why is coffee good for us? What does other research about coffee and diabetes suggest How much sugar and milk I personally add to my coffee? I’ll reveal my own easy recipe for diabetes-friendly coffee – I’m drinking one right now! In short, do coffee and diabetes go hand in hand together? Let’s find out: Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question I don’t really know anybody that wouldn’t l Continue reading >>

Prediabetes? The Coffee-health Connection

Prediabetes? The Coffee-health Connection

New research has shown—yet again—that drinking coffee can reduce your type 2 diabetes risk. The study, in nearly 1,500 Greek adults followed for a decade, found that people who downed the equivalent of 2.5 to 3 cups of brewed coffee daily had half the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. And people who drank about 1.5 cups of joe a day cut their risk by about 30%. “Apparently healthy individuals with no history of cardiovascular disease may benefit from daily consumption of this amount of coffee,” one of the study’s authors, Efi Koloverou, MmedSci, a clinical dietitian and doctoral candidate at Harokopio University in Athens, told DiabeticLifestyle in an e-mail interview. The findings were published July 1, 2015 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. There were too few decaf drinkers in the new study to draw conclusions about whether caffeine-free brew would have the same benefits. But there’s strong evidence from other research that decaf has similar protective effects, according to Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, the Flatt Professor in Foods and Nutrition at the University of Georgia in Athens and a national spokesperson for the American Society for Nutrition. Researchers suspect that a substance in the coffee bean itself is what helps to lower inflammation in the body. This in turn can reduce overall risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Johnson points to a 2014 meta-analysis (a study in which the results of several smaller studies are pooled and analyzed together) which included 28 studies and 1.1 million people and found both coffee and decaf coffee drinkers had a reduced likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. And the more a person drank, the lower their risk. Java drinkers got more good news earlier this year, when the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Continue reading >>

Effects Of Coffee Consumption On Fasting Blood Glucose And Insulin Concentrations

Effects Of Coffee Consumption On Fasting Blood Glucose And Insulin Concentrations

Randomized controlled trials in healthy volunteers Higher habitual coffee consumption was associated with higher insulin sensitivity (1) and a lower risk for type 2 diabetes (2–6) in diverse populations. In contrast, short-term metabolic studies showed that caffeine intake can acutely lower insulin sensitivity (7–9) and increase glucose concentrations (10–15). Randomized intervention studies are needed to examine whether tolerance to these acute effects develops after longer-term consumption (16). We therefore examined the effects of coffee and caffeine on fasting blood concentrations of glucose and insulin over 2–4 weeks in two crossover studies in healthy volunteers. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The studies were approved by the TNO Nutrition and Food Research Medical Ethics Committee, and all participants gave informed consent. The trials were originally designed to study the effects of coffee and caffeine on plasma concentrations of homocysteine, and the study designs have been reported in detail previously (17,18). Participants were regular coffee consumers (more than five cups/day) and did not have known diabetes. The first study was a 4-week crossover study that compared the effects of regular paper-filtered coffee consumption with that of coffee abstinence. A total of 40 volunteers used 1 l of coffee (70 g coffee grounds) for 4 weeks and abstained from coffee for 4 weeks in random order. Fourteen participants did not complete the trial because of nausea and restlessness (n = 7), possible susceptibility to adverse effects of caffeine intake (n = 3), or reasons unrelated to treatment (n = 4). Thus, 26 participants were included in the analysis. The second study had a Latin-square design with three treatments given in random order for 2 weeks each: caffeine ( Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Have you ever noticed a difference in your blood sugar after drinking a big cup of coffee or tea? According to the Mayo Clinic, caffeine can indeed have an affect on your blood glucose levels causing lower or higher fluctuations, so limited consumption is recommended for better control. Another study published by the ADA (2005) suggests that people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of hypoglycemia during the night by having a small to moderate amount of caffeine before bed. Some people also claim that symptoms of hypoglycemia become more noticeable when incorporating caffeine into their diet. The effects of caffeine on each person are varied though with the added factor of tolerance to the stimulant can build up as quantity increases. While some people claim that they see a noticeable difference in their BG levels when they drink caffeine, others say that they don’t have any issues incorporating caffeine with food. Let’s explore some variables that could contribute to the shift in BG levels in relation to caffeine consumption. Side effects Certain common side effects of caffeine consumption may often explain shifts in BG levels. Lack of sleep Not enough sleep has proven to contribute to insulin resistance in the body for people with Type 1. Too much caffeine could certainly contribute to insomnia, especially since caffeine tolerance decreases as we grow older. Elevated heart rate / “the jitters” Two common effects if too much caffeine is in the system, or if the body is not accustomed to it. These are also symptoms of hypoglycemia, which might cause someone with Type 1 to check their BG levels more frequently if mistaking the symptoms for a low. Heartburn / Upset stomach / Dehydration Some people are less tolerant to coffee and other caffeinat Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

1 / 11 What Causes Blood Sugar to Rise and Fall? Whether you were recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for several years, you know how fickle blood sugar levels can be, and how important it is that they stay controlled. Proper blood sugar control is key for helping ward off potential diabetes complications, such as kidney disease, nerve damage, vision problems, stroke, and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). If you keep your levels in check on a daily basis, it will help you stay energized, focused, and in a good mood. You’ll know if your diabetes is poorly controlled if you experience symptoms such as frequent urination, sores that won’t heal, blurred vision, and unexplained weight loss. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), proper medication, effective meal planning, regular exercise, and use of a blood glucose meter to track your numbers routinely can all help you keep your levels within a healthy range. The ADA recommends blood glucose be 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) before meals, and below 180 mg/dL two hours after the start of a meal. Furthermore, the organization recommends getting an A1C test, which measures your average blood glucose over the past two to three months, at least twice per year if your levels are stable and you are meeting treatment goals. Learning how different habits can cause your blood sugar to fluctuate can help you better predict how your levels will swing. You may be more likely to experience hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar if you have advanced-stage diabetes, according to the ADA. Meanwhile, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, may be caused by factors such as not using enough insulin or other diabetes medication, not following a prop Continue reading >>

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