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Does Botox Affect Diabetes

Diabetic Gastroparesis

Diabetic Gastroparesis

Learn the connection between diabetes and tummy and bowel troubles. By the dLife Editors If you have diabetes, you may have noticed that your digestion isn’t quite what it used to be. The connection isn’t obvious, but diabetes can damage the nervous system in ways that show up in the form of stomach or bowel problems. It’s sometimes referred to as diabetic gastroparesis. What is gastroparesis? In gastroparesis, also called delayed gastric emptying, the stomach takes too long to empty its contents. Here’s how it works. The autonomic nervous system—the part of the nervous system that “automatically” regulates our internal organs while we go about our lives —controls the movement of food through the digestive tract. Normally, the vagus nerve, which controls the muscles of the stomach, tells the muscles to contract after a meal or snack to break up food and move it along to the small intestine. But if the vagus nerve is damaged, the muscles of the stomach don’t work normally, and the movement of food slows or even grinds to a halt. Diabetes is the most common known cause of gastroparesis. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes can damage the vagus nerve if blood glucose levels stay high for too long. How? High blood glucose causes chemical changes in nerves and damages the blood vessels that bring them much-needed oxygen and nutrients. While there’s no cure for gastroparesis, treatment can help manage the condition. What are the signs of gastroparesis? Signs and symptoms may be mild or severe and can include: heartburn nausea vomiting of undigested food an early feeling of fullness when eating weight loss abdominal bloating erratic blood glucose levels lack of appetite acid reflux spasms of the stomach wall erratic bowel movements Symptoms might be worse after eatin Continue reading >>

Health News: How Botox Could Treat Diabetes, Why Chocolate Is Good For Parkinson's And St John's Wort Helps Cold Hands

Health News: How Botox Could Treat Diabetes, Why Chocolate Is Good For Parkinson's And St John's Wort Helps Cold Hands

Health news: How Botox could treat diabetes, why chocolate is good for Parkinson's and St John's Wort helps cold hands In ourpick of top health stories this week, researchershave found that Botox could ease chronic foot pain, dark chocolate is thought to affect Parkinson's, and how St John's Wort could help Raynaud's syndrome. Botox could treat the chronic foot pain associated with diabetes Botox could be a new treatment for a common symptom of diabetes. A new study has shown that the toxin can ease the chronic foot pain caused by the disease. Foot pain occurs as a result of damage to nerves, especially those in the lower legs and feet. This pain often doesn't respond to standard painkillers. In a study published in the journal Neurology, Taiwanese doctors tested Botox on 18 patients. Half the diabetic patients had an injection of Botox in each foot; the rest were given a saltwater solution injection. At the start of the study, the average pain score on a scale of 0 to 10 was 6.36. After the Botox therapy, patients reported a drop of 2.53 in their pain scores. Researchers admitted they had no rational explanation for the effect. Could dark chocolate help people with Parkinson's disease? In a new trial, doctors are looking at the effect dark chocolate has on the shaking movements associated with the condition. It follows research showing that Parkinson's patients eat more dark chocolate than those without the disease. It is thought this might be because it is a form of self-medication. Parkinson's is caused by a loss of nerve cells in the part of the brain responsible for producing dopamine, the chemical that helps transmit messages to control and coordinate body movement. If these nerve cells become damaged, the amount of dopamine is reduced and the messages to the bod Continue reading >>

Botox Proteins Could Hold Cure For Diabetes

Botox Proteins Could Hold Cure For Diabetes

Botox proteins could hold cure for diabetes The organisation of SNARE proteins in a cell. The position of SNARE proteins is shown in purple with vesicles ready for release shown in green. Scientists believe the proteins that are targeted by cosmetic surgery treatment Botox could hold the secret to treating and even curing Type 2 diabetes. A team of researchers at Heriot-Watt University is using new molecular microscopic techniques on SNARE proteins to solve the mystery of how insulin release is regulated and how this changes during Type 2 diabetes . SNARE proteins are targeted by Botox treatments, preventing them from helping muscles contract. However, their role goes well beyond the cosmetic realm, such as their work in the human pancreas. Dr Colin Rickman and his team are observing SNARE proteins in pancreatic beta-cells, the highly specialised cells that release insulin. Within the cells are SNARE proteins, which are the machinery that helps the beta-cells release the insulin to try and stabilise blood glucose levels . Type 2 diabetes occurs when the beta-cells can't cope with the prolonged high glucose levels of some obese patients and so secrete less insulin. The beta-cells lose both mass and function, but the reasons for this have always been unclear. The Heriot-Watt team hopes to answer these questions by observing SNARE proteins in the cell for the first time, pinpointing their exact location in an area equivalent to a ten-thousandth of a human hair. New methods of diagnosis for Type 2 diabetes Dr Colin Rickman said, "The human body has a system for storing glucose and releasing it when the body needs energy. This system controlled by the release of insulin. "When a person is obese, which a worryingly high and increasing number of people in the UK are, this sys Continue reading >>

What Diabetics Need To Know Before Plastic Surgery

What Diabetics Need To Know Before Plastic Surgery

Is your diabetes stopping you from considering a brow lift or facelift? If you are concerned about the effect your condition will have on the surgery’s results, like anyone you should do your research first. While diabetics do have an increased risk of complications from any type of surgical procedure, having diabetes doesn’t necessarily mean plastic surgery is off the table. Your surgeon can work with you to reduce your risks. Risks of Surgery One of the biggest risks for diabetics having surgery is that high blood sugar levels interfere with your body’s ability to heal. A study published in October 2013 in the journal "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery" found that patients with very high blood sugar (over 200) were more likely to have complications in their surgical wounds after having surgery to correct wounds related to their condition. An occurrence known as wound dehiscence, which happens when the surgical incision re-opens after the procedure, took place in 44 percent of patients who had blood sugar levels above 200. A normal blood sugar level is 100, or 140 if tested after eating. Just 19 percent of patients with normal blood sugar levels before surgery had wound dehiscence, according to the study. Having elevated hemoglobin A1c levels also increased a patient’s risk for wound dehiscence. High A1c levels suggest that a patient has had difficulty managing his or her diabetes. The issue with wounds reopening after surgery was three times more likely to occur in patients with elevated A1c levels. The Effect of Surgery on Blood Sugar Levels Stress on the body can affect blood sugar levels. During periods of high stress, the body is more likely to produce more blood glucose. Surgery, whether it’s a facelift or a life-saving procedure, causes physical stres Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Botox Injections With Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Botox Injections With Diabetes?

Is it safe to take botox injections with diabetes? Is it safe to take botox injections with diabetes? Hello everyone, I am a type 2 diabetes patient with all sorts of back and neck pain. I had been on medication for around two years. As the pain had got severe, I went to another specialist and they said that botox can be utilized to treat such torments where they referred me to med-aesthetics, a botox clinic in Brampton They said that botox are really helpful to lessen pain without the use of taking painkillers. In any case, I don't know whether it's safe to do the method with diabetes. Has anybody done botox injections with diabetes? A common, but serious side-effect associated with Botox use is Hypotonia (muscle weakness). If you have a chronic illness, like diabetes , your risk is increased. Moreover, you may experience overall weakness and headaches, following a Botox injection, if you have diabetes. Why? Well, Botox can actually trigger or worsen blood sugar (i.e. blood glucose) irregularities (commonly associated with diabetes), weakness and/or headaches. So, if you decide to go ahead and get Botox, make sure that your specialist closely monitors your blood glucose levels, before and after the injection. Furthermore, if you notice abrupt or severe muscle weakness, following a Botox treatment call your specialist immediately, rest and refrain from scheduling additional treatments until given the go ahead by your specialist. Continue reading >>

Botulinum Toxin Effects On Gasatrocnemius Strength And Plantar Pressure In Diabetics With Peripheral Neuropathy And Forefoot Ulceration

Botulinum Toxin Effects On Gasatrocnemius Strength And Plantar Pressure In Diabetics With Peripheral Neuropathy And Forefoot Ulceration

Botulinum toxin effects on gasatrocnemius strength and plantar pressure in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and forefoot ulceration The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Foot Ankle Int High forefoot plantar pressure is associated with plantar ulcers in people with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin A injected into the gastrocnemius-soleus muscles to reduce muscle strength and plantar pressure. This double blind, randomized clinical trial studied 17 people with diabetes mellitus, peripheral neuropathy and forefoot plantar ulcer. Subjects were randomized into one of three groups receiving gastrocnemius-soleus muscle injections on the involved side with; 1) Saline (n=5, weight = 99 21 kg), 2) 200 units of Botox (n=7, weight = 101 5 kg), or 3) 300 units of Botox (n=5, weight=129 22 kg). Botox dose was converted to units/kg, the majority received between 1.9 and 2.4 units/kg (n=11) and one 3.2 units/kg. Plantarflexor peak torque and forefoot peak plantar pressure were quantified prior and two weeks post injection. There were no complications from the injections. Plantarflexor peak torque on the involved side increased in the placebo and 300 groups (3 4 Nm and 6 10 Nm respectively) and decreased 8 11 Nm in the 200 group. There was no relationship between units/kg of Botox for each subject and change in plantarflexor peak torque. Forefoot peak plantar pressure did not change in the placebo and 300 groups (0 11 and 0 5 N/cm2 respectively) and decreased 4 16 N/cm2 (4%) for the 200 group. There were no adverse events associated with the Botox injections. This study was unable to determine the dose to consistently reduce plantarflexor strength and forefoot pl Continue reading >>

Botox Injections: Side Effects, Risk & Warning

Botox Injections: Side Effects, Risk & Warning

Botulinum toxin ( Botox , onabotulinumtoxinA) is a material that has been known for over a century and used for medical purposes for more than 50 years. Its initial uses were for lazy eye ( strabismus ), blepharospasm (inability to move the eyelids in certain ways), and wry neck (cervical dystonia). In 2002, it was approved for improving and relaxing frown lines in the area (the glabella) between the eyes on the forehead and has been used successfully in more than over 11 million patients since that time, based on estimates from data supplied by the Allergan Corporation. In 2004, Botox was approved for excess sweating ( hyperhidrosis ), and in 2010, Botox was approved for the treatment of migraine headaches. A common misconception is that Botox actually paralyzes the muscles in the face. Although, this can happen with extreme amounts of Botox, most physicians strive to inject just the amount that allows the patient to have some limited activity but not so much that they have overactivity of the areas. Patients should know that Botox is not used to keep them from expressing themselves but simply to keep them from making facial grimaces and frowns that have become habits and are unintended. When done correctly, most people who are not trained cosmetic surgeons will not notice that a Botox procedure has been performed but simply that the patient looks more rested or happier. Botox comes as a crystalline substance from the manufacturer, which then has to be reconstituted with saline or another liquid. Practitioners add varying amounts of liquid when reconstituting it. Although there is no right or wrong amount of liquid to add, most physicians add about 2 mL-3 mL (about a half a teaspoon) of liquid to each vial. Some add quite a bit more, which can lead patients to think t Continue reading >>

Botox: Get Facts On The Cosmetic Procedure

Botox: Get Facts On The Cosmetic Procedure

Botox is a brand name of a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. There are other brand names for botulinum, such as Xeomin. In large amounts, this toxin can cause botulism , which you probably associate with food poisoning . Despite the fact that one of the most serious complications of botulism is paralysis , scientists have discovered a way to use it to human advantage. Small, diluted amounts can be directly injected into specific muscles causing controlled weakening of the muscles. The FDA approved such usage in the late 1980s upon the discovery that Botox could stop ailments like blepharospasm (uncontrolled blinking) and strabismus ( lazy eye ). Doctors have been using Botox for years to successfully treat wrinkles and facial creases. In April 2002, Botox gained FDA approval for treatment of moderate-to-severe frown lines between the eyebrows - called glabellar lines. However, Botox is often used for other areas of the face as well. Botox blocks signals from the nerves to the muscles. The injected muscle can no longer contract, which causes the wrinkles to relax and soften. It is most often used on forehead lines, crow's feet (lines around the eye) and frown lines. Wrinkles caused by sun damage and gravity will not respond to Botox. Getting Botox takes only a few minutes and no anesthesia is required. Botox is injected with a fine needle into specific muscles with only minor discomfort. It generally takes three to seven days to take full effect and it is best to avoid alcohol at least one week prior to treatment. Aspirin and anti-inflammatory medications should be stopped two weeks before treatment as well in order to reduce bruising. The effects from Botox will last four to six months. As muscle action gradually returns, the lines and wrinkles beg Continue reading >>

Understanding Botox May Help Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Botox May Help Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding BOTOX May Help Type 2 Diabetes Understanding how BOTOX works may help researchers diagnose and treat Type 2 Diabetes. asics basket chaussures timberland What do BOTOX and Type 2 Diabetes have to do with each other you ask? The proteins affected by injections of the wrinkle relaxer BOTOX could help scientists develop new ways to treat Type 2 Diabetes. nike air max pas cher nike free trainer BOTOX Cosmetic is best known as an injection for helping patient smooth fine lines and wrinkles in order to look their best. nike air max 90 femme 2017 asics kinsei BOTOX is also used as treatment for a number of medical conditions including migraine, urinary incontinence, profuse sweating and crossed eyes, among others. nike air max 2017 pas cher In each of these cases, BOTOX works because it has a paralyzing effect: that is, it relaxes specific muscles, which then provides the desired effect. asics pulse soldes BOTOX accomplishes this effect by blocking certain proteins called SNARE (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein Receptor) proteins. timberland pas cher chaussures nike femme 2017 It turns out that SNARE proteins in the beta cells of the pancreas help the pancreas secrete insulin, thus blocking these proteins in the pancreas could lead to insulin resistance which is the hallmark of Type 2 Diabetes. nike air max command soldes Understanding this mechanism will hopefully provide researchers with new ways to diagnose and treat Type 2 Diabetes in the future. If you or someone you know has questions about how the proteins affected by BOTOX might help us diagnose and treat Type 2 Diabetes, please call The Eye Clinic of Texas, an affiliate of Houston Eye Associates, at 800-423-3937, visit The Eye Clinic of Texas or facebook.com/ecot.lasik to schedule an appointment. The Eye C Continue reading >>

Botox - Fda Prescribing Information, Side Effects And Uses

Botox - Fda Prescribing Information, Side Effects And Uses

Postmarketing reports indicate that the effects of Botox and all botulinum toxin products may spread from the area of injection to produce symptoms consistent with botulinum toxin effects. These may include asthenia, generalized muscle weakness, diplopia, ptosis, dysphagia, dysphonia, dysarthria, urinary incontinence and breathing difficulties. These symptoms have been reported hours to weeks after injection. Swallowing and breathing difficulties can be life threatening and there have been reports of death. The risk of symptoms is probably greatest in children treated for spasticity but symptoms can also occur in adults treated for spasticity and other conditions, particularly in those patients who have an underlying condition that would predispose them to these symptoms. In unapproved uses, including spasticity in children, and in approved indications, cases of spread of effect have been reported at doses comparable to those used to treat cervical dystonia and spasticity and at lower doses. [See Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2 )] Botox(onabotulinumtoxinA) for injection is indicated for the treatment of overactive bladder with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and frequency, in adults who have an inadequate response to or are intolerant of an anticholinergic medication. Detrusor Overactivity associated with a Neurologic Condition Botoxis indicated for the treatment of urinary incontinence due to detrusor overactivity associated with a neurologic condition (e.g., SCI, MS) in adults who have an inadequate response to or are intolerant of an anticholinergic medication. Botoxis indicated for the prophylaxis of headaches in adult patients with chronic migraine (15 days per month with headache lasting 4 hours a day or longer). Safety and effectiveness have not b Continue reading >>

Connecticut Lasik Laser Cataract Eye Surgery Blog Doctor & Associates: Botox & Type 2 Diabetes: What Do They Have In Common?

Connecticut Lasik Laser Cataract Eye Surgery Blog Doctor & Associates: Botox & Type 2 Diabetes: What Do They Have In Common?

Doctor & Associates, Fairfield County, Connecticut, Eye Exams and LASIK, Laser Cataract Surgery, Lens Implants, Glaucoma, Eyelid Surgery, Eyeglasses, Diabetic Retinopathy and Macular Degeneration. BOTOX & Type 2 Diabetes: What Do They Have in Common? There is some interestingresearch about BOTOX and Type 2 Diabetes. What do BOTOX and Type 2 Diabeteshave to do with each other you ask? Anew study reports that it appears a better understanding of the proteinsaffected by injections of the wrinkle relaxer BOTOX could help scientistsdevelop new ways to treat Type 2 Diabetes. BOTOX Cosmetic is bestknown as an injection for helping patient smooth fine lines and wrinkles inorder to look their best. BOTOX is also used as treatment for a number ofmedical conditions including migraine, urinary incontinence, profuse sweatingand crossed eyes, among others. In each of these cases, BOTOX works because ithas a paralyzing effect: that is, it relaxes specific muscles, which thenprovides the desired effect. BOTOX accomplishes this effect by blockingcertain proteins called SNARE (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein Receptor)proteins. It turns out that SNARE proteins in the beta cells of the pancreashelp the pancreas secrete insulin, thus blocking these proteins in the pancreascould lead to insulin resistance which is the hallmark of Type 2 Diabetes.Understanding this mechanism will hopefully provide researchers with new waysto diagnose and treat Type 2 Diabetes in the future. If you or someone you know isinteresting in learning more about the mechanisms or clinical application of BOTOX Cosmetic and how it might be related to understanding Type 2 Diabetes please call Doctor& Associates -203-227-4113, visit Doctor & Associates inFairfield County or facebook.com/doctorandassociates to schedule ana Continue reading >>

Botox Injections | Rejuvenating Skin Care

Botox Injections | Rejuvenating Skin Care

Relax the lines between your eyebrows, and see dramatic smoothness with BOTOX Cosmetic. To reduce fine lines and wrinkles, the treatment of choice is BOTOX Cosmetic (Botulinum Toxin Type A). What is BOTOX Cosmetic and How does it work? BOTOX Cosmetic is a purified botulinum toxin that has been FDA approved for the treatment of moderate to severe frown lines between the brows. Low doses of BOTOX Cosmetic are injected by a very fine tip needle into the muscles that cause frowning. BOTOX Cosmetic works within the neurotransmitters to prevent the muscles to contract. Within 1 week, the region of treatment will become relaxed preventing strong muscles to create the skin fold that normally appears as a fine line or wrinkle. This localized treatment will not affect ones expression but, will give a more relaxed and smooth appearance. Lines that are deeper and more visible at rest are usually treated with Juvederm; an injectable gel. Both men and women are candidates for this treatment. The common age for individuals to receive treatment; are ages 21 to 65. How Should I Prepare to Received Such a Treatment? It is recommended to avoid, any chemical peels or laser treatments at least 1 week prior to treatment. Avoid taking any oral supplements such as Vitamin E or Fish Oils to help prevent bruising. Medications such as St. Johns Wort, Ibuprofen, Motrin, Aspirin, Aleve, Excedrin, and other anti-inflammatory medications should be avoided at least 2 days prior to treatment to minimize bleeding and bruising. At Rejuvenating Skin Care, we take pride in our specialty. Only Experienced Licensed Professionals Administer BOTOX Cosmetic. With any small injection, you may feel some discomfort however, to minimize such pain a topical aesthetic will be applied at your discretion. Localized te Continue reading >>

Botox And Type 2 Diabetes, An Unlikely Connection

Botox And Type 2 Diabetes, An Unlikely Connection

Botox and Type 2 Diabetes, An Unlikely Connection By Deborah Mitchell G+ Jul 29 2013 - 12:18pm Scientific research sometimes uncovers some unlikely connections, such as one between Botox and type 2 diabetes. A new study reports that it appears a better understanding of the proteins affected by injections of the wrinkle relaxer could help scientists develop new ways to treat the metabolic disease. What does Botox have to do with diabetes? Botox (onabotulinumtoxin A) is perhaps best known as an injectable substance that can temporarily reduce or eliminate wrinkles as well as treat medical conditions, such as migraine, urinary incontinence, and crossed eyes, among others. In each of these cases, Botox works because it has a paralyzing effect: that is, it relaxes specific muscles, which then provides the desired relief. In the case of type 2 diabetes, there are no muscles to relax, but there are proteins called SNARE (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein Receptor) involved, and that appears to be the connection. Heres a brief explanation of that relationship. Botox seeks out SNARE proteins, which then prevents them from assisting muscle contraction. However, in people who have type 2 diabetes, something else may occur when Botox meets up with the SNARE proteins in the beta cells in the pancreas, which are the cells that produce insulin, because SNARE proteins in beta cells help release insulin. According to Dr. Colin Rickman and his team at Heriot-Watt University, experts do not yet fully understand how SNARE proteins are responsible for the secretion of insulin. However, once researchers more thoroughly understand SNARE proteins and insulin and explore what happens in type 2 diabetes, this could lead to new methods of diagnosis, prevention of the cells failure that leads to dia Continue reading >>

Will You Have High Blood Sugar With Botox - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have High Blood Sugar With Botox - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 74 year old woman who takes Rocephin, Tramadol NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Common Side Effects Of Botox (botulinum Toxin Type A) Drug Center - Rxlist

Common Side Effects Of Botox (botulinum Toxin Type A) Drug Center - Rxlist

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; feeling like you might pass out; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. The botulinum toxin contained in Botox can spread to other body areas beyond where it was injected. This has caused serious life-threatening side effects in some people receiving botulism toxin injections, even for cosmetic purposes. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects, some of which can occur up to several weeks after an injection: trouble breathing, talking, or swallowing; unusual or severe muscle weakness (especially in a body area that was not injected with the medication); chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, general ill feeling. muscle weakness near where the medicine was injected; bruising, bleeding, pain, redness, or swelling where the injection was given; headache, muscle stiffness, neck or back pain; fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose, flu symptoms, nausea, diarrhea, stomach pain, loss of appetite; dry mouth, dry eyes, ringing in your ears; increased sweating in areas other than the underarms; itchy or watery eyes, increased sensitivity to light; or This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. The following adverse reactions to BOTOX (onabotulinumtoxinA) for injection are discussed in greater detail in other sections of thelabeling: Spread of Toxin Effects [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ] Serious Adverse Reactions with Unapproved Use [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ] Hypersensitivity Reactions [see CONTRAINDICATIONS and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ] Increased Risk of Clinically S Continue reading >>

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