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Does Bcaa Raise Blood Sugar

What Do We Know About Bcaa ?

What Do We Know About Bcaa ?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can anyone explain to me about Branch Chain Amino Acids (in simple terms please). Another forum suggested that I might take a BCAA supplement prior to exercise and wiki suggests they help with regulating blood sugar. BCAA is on the edge of my radar, so I can't be much help. So much to learn, so little time Yeah - I take them sometimes, along with MCT oil to juice my ketone production. BCAAs leucine and lysine are amino acids that are broken down into ketones rather than glucose. There are a couple ways to kickstart ketone production, if thats what youre after. You can increase your intake of medium chain triglycerides, as found in coconut products. Since MCTs dont show up in cell membranes and never really appear in adipose tissue, they go directly to the liver to be converted into acetyl-CoA for energy. Remember how the acetyl-CoA-ATP pathway can be overwhelmed, thus spurring the creation of ketones? Thats what eating MCTs can do increase ketone production. Use more coconut oil and fewer long-chain saturated fats (which do go into cell membranes, can show up in adipose tissue, and are less likely to overwhelm the livers ability to make ATP), like animals fats, while you get adjusted. You could also incorporate ketogenic amino acids. Huh? Well, a bit like how certain amino acids are more likely to participate in glucogenesis, certain amino acids are more likely to participate in ketogenesis. Both lysine and leucine are readily converted into ketone bodies. As Paul Jaminet points out, high-leucine ketogenic diets have allowed researchers to treat epileptic patients without having to resort to the overly restrictive traditional ketogenic diets. Doing it Continue reading >>

Bcaa Benefits And Side Effects

Bcaa Benefits And Side Effects

CLICK HERE TO ORDER AML'S POST-WORKOUT TODAY! 1. Blomstrand, E., Eliasson, J., Karlsson, H.K., and Kohnke, R. (2006). Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr 136, 269S-273S. 2. Shimomura, Y., Yamamoto, Y., Bajotto, G., Sato, J., Murakami, T., Shimomura, N., Kobayashi, H., and Mawatari, K. (2006). Nutraceutical effects of branched-chain amino acids on skeletal muscle. J Nutr 136, 529S-532S. 3. Newgard, C.B., An, J., Bain, J.R., Muehlbauer, M.J., Stevens, R.D., Lien, L.F., Haqq, A.M., Shah, S.H., Arlotto, M., Slentz, C.A., Rochon, J., Gallup, D., Ilkayeva, O., Wenner, B.R., Yancy, W.S., Jr., Eisenson, H., Musante, G., Surwit, R.S., Millington, D.S., Butler, M.D., and Svetkey, L.P. (2009). A branched-chain amino acid-related metabolic signature that differentiates obese and lean humans and contributes to insulin resistance. Cell Metab 9, 311-326. 4. Walker, D.K., Dickinson, J.M., Timmerman, K.L., Drummond, M.J., Reidy, P.T., Fry, C.S., Gundermann, D.M., and Rasmussen, B.B. (2011). Exercise, amino acids, and aging in the control of human muscle protein synthesis. Med Sci Sports Exerc 43, 2249-2258. 5. Pasiakos, S.M., McClung, H.L., McClung, J.P., Margolis, L.M., Andersen, N.E., Cloutier, G.J., Pikosky, M.A., Rood, J.C., Fielding, R.A., and Young, A.J. (2011). Leucine-enriched essential amino acid supplementation during moderate steady state exercise enhances postexercise muscle protein synthesis. Am J Clin Nutr 94, 809-818. 6. Manders, R.J., Koopman, R., Beelen, M., Gijsen, A.P., Wodzig, W.K., Saris, W.H., and van Loon, L.J. (2008). The muscle protein synthetic response to carbohydrate and protein ingestion is not impaired in men with longstanding type 2 diabetes. J Nutr 138, 1079-1085. 7. Doi, M., Yamaoka, I., N Continue reading >>

All About Bcaas | Precision Nutrition

All About Bcaas | Precision Nutrition

Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are so called because of their structure, which includes a side chain of one carbon atom and three hydrogen atoms. There are three BCAAs: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Of these, leucine is the most heavily researched, and appears to offer the biggest physiological benefit. (More on that below.) For the science geeks, these hydrophobic (water-fearing) amino acids are referred to as aliphatic (from the Greek aleiphar, or oil), as their central carbon attaches to a branched non-cyclic, open carbon chain. BCAAs provide the basis for protein synthesis and energy production (Harper AE et al 1984; Patti ME et al 1998; Xu G et al 1998; Anthony JC et al 2001). In fact, BCAAs can comprise up to one-third of muscle protein (Mero 1999). Because of their prevalence and involvement in protein synthesis and energy production, BCAAs are important to many metabolic processes. However, if BCAAs are going to participate in these processes, they must be available to the body. This means we have to eat enough BCAAs, and at the right times, to enable such processes to occur. Why is adequate BCAA intake so important? The BCAAs are the only amino acids not degraded in the liver. All other amino acids are regulated by the gut and the liver before being circulated elsewhere in the body. However, BCAAs head directly into the bloodstream. This means that dietary intake of BCAAs directly influences plasma levels and concentrations in muscle tissue (Layman DK 2003). Interestingly, BCAAs are burned for energy (oxidized) during exercise, so theyre also an important exercise fuel. Consuming BCAAs before training can increase uptake into muscle tissue (Mittleman KD et al 1998). This has many benefits: BCAA supplementa Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Bcaa's On Blood Glucose Levels

The Effects Of Bcaa's On Blood Glucose Levels

The Effects of BCAA's on Blood Glucose Levels I enjoy taking a walk early in the morning, right after waking up, as I believe it is a great way to burn off some extra fat. When doing so, I drink 5-10 grams of amino acids by coach Thib's and other coaches reccomendation. But, I've been wondering if these amino acids creates a rise in insulin, significant enough to diminish the claimed boosted fat-burning effects of fasted cardio. I tried but failed at finding an definitive answer to this. So, I've bought my own glucose meter,and I will be doing some measuring on myself, along with measuring body temperature and heartbeat in the morning. If this is something people are interested in, then I'll post my result. I'm open for suggestions to other similliar experiments requiring a glucose meter. I don't think BCAA's would be necessary for walking though.. unless you're doing like an hour on the incline. I don't think BCAA's would be necessary for walking though.. unless you're doing like an hour on the incline. Even then, I would question the need. I understand the concerns, but I just don't see any real-world evidence of the body cannibalizing lean mass in response to low-intensity anything. Now getting in some pre-workout BCAAs for a heavy lifting session, now that makes perfect sense and is backed by research. Some great coaches have a discussion on the topic: and as you can read, coach Thib suggest using BCAA's when doing fasted cardio. But I see what you mean, and that is why I'm testing it also. And if it doesn't counteract the enhanced fat burning effect, then there is no harm in ingesting BCAA's before fasted cardio, as they surely will protect muscle to some degree. If they prove not to, then why not use them? I always take some BCAAs (Scivation xtend - great stuff b Continue reading >>

3. Amino Acids Stimulate The Release Of Both Glucagon And Insulin

3. Amino Acids Stimulate The Release Of Both Glucagon And Insulin

In a person without diabetes, a rise in blood amino acid concentration (the result of protein metabolism) stimulates the secretion of both glucagon and insulin, so their blood sugar remains stable. But in people with diabetes, the release of glucagon without insulin or with impaired insulin response can cause our blood sugar to rise precipitously several hours after a meal high in protein. The insulin is secreted to stimulate protein synthesis--the uptake of amino acids into muscle cells--making them less available for gluconeogenesis. The glucagon is secreted to stimulate the uptake of amino acids into the cells of the liver for gluconeogenesis. So why are these two hormones battling for opposing uses of the same amino acids? Isn't that non-productive? Actually, the phenomenon serves an important purpose. As you probably know, insulin lowers the blood sugar, while glucagon raises it. In the non-diabetic state, the release of these two opposing hormones ensures that the amino acids are used for protein synthesis (because of the extra insulin) but the blood sugar doesn't drop to dangerously low levels, even if the meal was low in carbohydrate. As a result, blood glucose concentration remains reasonably stable during protein metabolism. The insulin and glucagon essentially cancel each other out in terms of their effect on blood glucose, while the insulin is still able to promote protein synthesis. But in people with diabetes, as I mentioned earlier, the release of glucagon without insulin or with impaired insulin response can cause our blood sugar to rise precipitously several hours after a meal high in protein. This is due not only to the glucagon's directly raising the blood sugar, but also to the fact that in the absence of insulin it increases the amount of the amino Continue reading >>

Bcaa's And Blood Sugar

Bcaa's And Blood Sugar

As part of my new supplement regime I've taken to mixing bulk Bcaa's/Xtend and a little crystal light into a gallon of water and using it to drink throughout the day to meet both my water requirements and to experiment with some truly megadosed BCAA levels (50gms + per day in addition to the amount found in 2 protein shakes daily). I don't know if I can link another board but the owner of Ironaddict's gave me the idea after he has been trying with much success (recovery, energy) over the past two weeks. One thing that has been documented though was glucose readings taken after a fasted state, then taken again after an initial amount of the BCAA mix is ingested. The glucose level had been consistently reading in the mid 50's or so which to my knowledge would indicate that there's some level of insulin release going on here after the BCAA ingestion. Can anyone contribute to this, or clarify if this is a good thing or not. I would imagine you would not want to walk around in a chronic state of hypoglycemia, but is there anyone who can clarify this further??? are these bcaa's actually bulk or actually xtend? I know there is some amount of sucralose in xtend (maybe a gram unaccounted for per serving) Don't know enough about bloodsugar levels to help any more. both. for cost reasons I mix 2-4 scoops of xtend and "supplement" the rest with BCAA's to reach the desired total. good point though because I have heard that some artificial sweetners can mess with your blood sugar. I re-read some of the info on the other board and I think I mis-spoke regarding what was going on here. It seems that the BCAA's intake has been pushing the blood sugar levels down low enough to be in the low normal range, but have supressed them even farther when taken with a carb source. To me this means Continue reading >>

The Science Of Bcaa Supplements

The Science Of Bcaa Supplements

The Latest, Science-Based Information In Health, Fitness & Fat Loss Jade Teta ND CSCS & Keoni Teta ND, LAc, CSCS Exercise is a key component of any weight loss program. Yet a major challenge of weight loss protocols is controlling the compensatory reactions that naturally occur with increased activity, namely increased hunger and cravings, created by the unique hormonal changes that occur during exercise (1-3). Another confounding factor is maintaining muscle mass in those undergoing rigorous exercise regimes for weight loss. This is especially true when low carb or low calorie diets are combined with exercise (9). Because muscle mass determines 40% of an individuals ability to handle insulin and approximately 80% of a persons blood sugar use, muscle is perhaps one of the most valuable resource in weight loss protocols (5-6). The branched chain amino acids (BCAA) may have special utilization in weight loss programs combining exercise with diet. BCAA supplementation has been shown to increase muscle mass (4,12), decrease hunger (13), regulate blood sugar (10,14), attenuate the stress hormone response of exercise (7), and may increase exercise capacity (4,11) and fat-burning (11) directly. The journal Obesity in 2008 showed resistance training is one tool to help maintain muscle mass when dieting (8). BCAA are another. Branched chain amino acids, most notably leucine, interact with the anabolic cell signaling messenger mTOR stimulating muscle growth alone and synergistically with resistance exercise (15). This is an important consideration since studies have shown traditional weight loss approaches can impact muscle mass and decrease metabolic rate (BMR) by 10-20% (16). A slowed BMR is a predictor of yo-yo weight gain. Those with the largest metabolic declines induced by Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level

Blood Sugar Level

Three-pronged approach to diabetes A healthy diet, sufficient exercise, and avoidance of nicotine and alcohol can significantly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Even elevated blood sugar levels and limited insulin sensitivity can often be improved with specific measures. In many cases, long term insulin administration can thus be avoided altogether, or at least meaningfully reduced. In order to reduce possible damage from elevated blood sugar levels, nutrition experts recommend supporting your metabolism with the following three-pronged approach: Losing weight and exercising: Those who exercise strengthen their heart, circulation, blood vessels, and joints. Slightly elevated blood sugar levels can often be brought down to normal levels through a healthy diet, weight loss, and exercise alone. Insulin resistance and the flexibility of blood vessels can be improved through diet, and antioxidants can help protect cells from the damage caused by high blood sugar. The amino acids, vitamins, and trace elements highlighted in the following section are therefore of particular importance to the body’s own regulation of blood sugar levels. Amino acids and the regulation of blood sugar levels L-arginine L-arginine improves circulation plays a role in your cardiovascular health (blood pressure, particularly circulation in fine blood vessels). L-arginine forms the molecule, NO (nitric oxide), which signals in the relaxation and dilation of blood vessels. Many studies have confirmed that taking L-arginine can result in improved circulation and blood pressure. Endothelial dysfunction (dysfunction of the interior wall of blood vessels) is usually first observed in the smallest blood vessels, for example those found in the retina of the eye or a man’s penis. In studies, Continue reading >>

Bcaa Supplements And Diabetes

Bcaa Supplements And Diabetes

Posted on October 26, 2014 | No Comments on BCAA Supplements and Diabetes BCAA or Branched-chain amino acids are essential nutrients from proteins found in meat, dairy products, and legumes. BCAA supplements are commonly used to treat poor appetite in elderly who are suffering from kidney failure and to prevent fatigue and improve concentration. Some athletes use BCAA to improve exercise performance. Still others use it as a dietary supplement for people having problems with eating such as diabetic people. BCAA help stimulate the building of protein in muscle and perhaps decrease muscle breakdown which is generally ideal for sick people to prevent muscle loss. For diabetics however, BCAA supplements should be cautiously taken. It would be better to seek advice of doctor before taking BCAA supplement. This is because some studies show that BCAA can decrease blood sugar. Thus, if taken with other diabetes medications, a diabetic can suffer from extremely low blood sugar. Moreover, the taking of BCAA supplements also can possibly lead to diabetes. Studies from the Duke University medical center showed that too Much Protein allegedly from taking BCAA supplements along with eating, can lead to insulin resistance in the long run. And developing insulin resistance is a precursor to diabetes. In lieu of these findings, it is important for people to consult doctors and nutritionists before taking BCAA supplements. Continue reading >>

Bcaa Benefits: A Review Of Branched-chain Amino Acids

Bcaa Benefits: A Review Of Branched-chain Amino Acids

BCAA Benefits: A Review of Branched-Chain Amino Acids Written by Alina Petre, MS, RD (CA) on November 25, 2016 Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are a group of three essential amino acids: leucine, isoleucine and valine. BCAA supplements are commonly taken in order to boost muscle growth and enhance exercise performance. They may also help with weight loss and reduce fatigue after exercise. This article contains all the most important information about branched-chain amino acids and their benefits. BCAAs consist of three essential amino acids: These amino acids are grouped together because they are the only three amino acid to have a chain that branches off to one side. Their molecular structure looks like this: Image Source: Bodybuilding.com Like all amino acids, BCAAs are building blocks your body uses to make proteins . BCAAs are considered essential because, unlike non-essential amino acids, your body cannot make them. Therefore, it is essential to get them from your diet. Bottom Line: The three BCAAs are leucine, isoleucine and valine. All have a branched molecular structure and are considered essential to the human body. BCAAs make up a large chunk of the body's total amino acid pool. Together, they represent around 3540% of all essential amino acids present in your body and 1418% of those found in your muscles ( 1 ). Contrary to most other amino acids, BCAAs are mostly broken down in the muscle, rather than in the liver. Because of this, they are thought to play a role in energy production during exercise ( 2 ). BCAAs play several other roles in your body too. First, your body can use them as building blocks for protein and muscle ( 3 , 4 , 5 ). They may also be involved in regulating your blood sugar levels by preserving liver and muscle sugar stores and stimu Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Glutamine And Your Blood Sugar

Glutamine And Your Blood Sugar

Based in Houston, Texas, Dr. Mary D. Daley has been writing and editing health and medicine articles for more than 20 years. Daley holds an MD degree, as well as MS in immunology and MS in biomedical writing degrees. She is also a board-certified anesthesiologist in the United States and Canada. The chemical equation for glutamate.Photo Credit: Zerbor/iStock/Getty Images When you hear the word glutamine, you might automatically think about muscle building. Glutamine is one of several amino acids, which are building blocks for protein in your body. But glutamine has other functions as well, including the ability to alter blood sugar levels. The effects are complicated, however, as glutamine can act in various ways to both increase and decrease blood sugar levels. Nevertheless, the few research studies that have been conducted so far in people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) suggest that the overall effect of glutamine supplements may be a slight lowering of blood sugar levels. Glutamine is produced naturally in your body, especially within your muscles. While some glutamine combines with other amino acids to form muscle proteins, most is released into the bloodstream. It travels in the blood to other parts of your body and exerts numerous effects. One of these effects is to increase the production of glucose -- also known as blood sugar -- in your liver and kidneys. Cells in these organs can directly transform glutamine into glucose through a series of chemical reactions. When this glucose is then released into the blood, your blood sugar level rises. Glutamine can also stimulate specialized cells in your pancreas to release a hormone called glucagon into the bloodstream. When glucagon reaches the liver, it stimulates the liver cells to produce more glucose. This is another Continue reading >>

Amino Acids And Their Significance For Diabetes

Amino Acids And Their Significance For Diabetes

Arginine can reduce insulin resistance Diabetics cannot sufficiently utilise carbohydrates such as sugar, which is an important energy source. Insulin plays a significant role here as it is a blood-sugar reducing endogenous hormone and the production of insulin is lower in those affected. Furthermore, the cells in their bodies are not able to properly absorb the insulin that is available. The reason for this is the highly diminished sensitivity of the cells towards insulin. The cell membranes are unable to recognise the hormone and therefore do not absorb enough of it. The consequence of this so-called insulin resistance is that not enough energy is produced in the cells. Moreover, sugar cannot properly be degraded in the blood and therefore accumulates so that the blood sugar level increases. Over the long-term, a constantly elevated blood sugar level can damage the vessels and lead to calcification and typical resulting illnesses such as stroke or heart attack. Diabetes mellitus type 2 is mostly associated with older people, as the insulin sensitivity in the cells decreases with age. A well-received study from 1998 showed that arginine can reduce insulin resistance, meaning in turn that insulin sensitivity can be increased.1 Arginine - an important amino acid for insulin absorption Another study by European researchers showed that the amino acid arginine is of great importance for the sensitivity of the body’s cells towards insulin. Arginine is a precursor of nitrogen oxide, a transmitting substance which has a direct influence on insulin sensitivity. For the study, six type two diabetes patients were split into two groups. Both groups consumed a normal diabetic diet. One of the groups was administered a placebo to be taken three times daily for one month. The other Continue reading >>

Branched-chain Amino Acids And The Association With Type2 Diabetes

Branched-chain Amino Acids And The Association With Type2 Diabetes

Branched-chain amino acids and the association with type2 diabetes Department of Endocrinology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, China Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2015 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association of the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is soaring worldwide and is now recognized as one of the main threats to human health being associated with comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease. Type 2 diabetes is a condition characterized by abnormalities in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism, with the most characteristic features being hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. The underlying pathological aberrations comprise insulin resistance and bihormonal dysfunction of the pancreatic - and -cells. As aforementioned, high-protein diets are associated with impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and an increased incidence of type2 diabetes 1 . Protein consists of amino acids (AAs). AAs were traditionally classified as essential or non-essential for humans and animals. Essential AAs cannot be synthesized from other compounds in the body at the level required for normal growth, so they must be obtained from food. Leucine, isoleucine and valine are named as branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). BCAAs are the most abundant of the essential AAs. Leucine is the most abundant BCAA in Continue reading >>

Bcaas, Insulin And Bloodsugar

Bcaas, Insulin And Bloodsugar

Speaker, Author, Gentleman, Entrepreneur and founder of Physique Formula All Natural Supplements & Shimbos Organic Food Do BCAAS raise your insulin levels? Can you use branched chain amino acids without spiking your blood sugar? These are just two of the common questions that I receive from athletes, bodybuilders and hard training athletes who want to know if using a BCAA supplement is going to knock them out of ketosis or give them high blood sugar levels. Jimmy Smith,MS,CSCS is the president of The Physique Formula, an all natural supplement company. Use code medium20 at checkout to save 20% on all supplements including bcaas with stevia at And the answer is NO. Im not sure where all the confusion started honestly but Im here to point out the science. This 2016 paper , The Emerging Role of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Insulin Resistance and Metabolism, points out how BCAA can act as a therapeutic agent for IMPROVING insulin resistance. Thats right, not only do BCAAS not raise blood sugar or insulin levels but they actually help LOWER insulin. The first phase happens as you CHEW or DRINK your food. Its almost instant and is a short phase insulin response to the incoming nutrients that your gut is going to digest. This instant response comes then quickly exits the body. The second phase is where the problem starts. This is what we typically think when we talk about carbs, body fat and insulin. So what are the roles of BCAAS ? BCAAS only result in that first insulin response which is merely a signal to your gut to get ready to digest food. There is NO negative insulin response to BCAAS. BCAAS are safe to be consumed on a ketogenic diet,it will keep you in ketosis. There is even emerging evidence that shows that BCAAS, particularly leucine, may even help ketone bodies g Continue reading >>

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