diabetestalk.net

Does Barium Affect Blood Sugar

Atsdr - Public Health Statement: Barium

Atsdr - Public Health Statement: Barium

This map displays locations where Barium is known to be present. This Public Health Statement is the summary chapter from the Toxicological Profile for Barium . It is one in a series of Public Health Statements about hazardous substances and their health effects. A shorter version, the ToxFAQs , is also available. This information is important because these substances may harm you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are present. For more information, call the ATSDR Information Center at 1-800-232-4636. This public health statement tells you about barium and barium compounds and the effects of exposure to these chemicals. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identifies the most serious hazardous waste sites in the nation. These sites are then placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) and are targeted for long-term federal clean-up activities. Barium and barium compounds have been found in at least 798 of the 1,684 current or former NPL sites; however, the total number of NPL sites evaluated for these substances is not known. This information is important because these sites may be sources of exposure and exposure to these substances may harm you. When a substance is released either from a large area, such as an industrial plant, or from a container, such as a drum or bottle, it enters the environment. Such a release does not always lead to exposure. You can be exposed to a substance only when you come in contact with it. You may be exposed by breathing, eating, or drinking the substance, or by skin contact. If you are exposed to barium and barium compounds, many factors will determine whether you will be harmed. These factors include the Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis: Diagnosing

Gastroparesis: Diagnosing

from Dr. Bernsteins book Diabetes Solution Efforts at diagnosis are usually unnecessary if there is no reason to suspect the presence of gastroparesis. So first we must have an index of suspicion. If, at the initial history-taking interview with your physician, you mention symptoms like those described earlier in this chapter, he should have a high index of suspicion. If your R-R interval study (Chapter 2) at the initial physical exam is grossly abnormal, he can be quite certain of gastroparesis. Remember that this study checks the ability of the vagus nerve to regulate heart rate. If the nerve fibers going to the heart are impaired, the branches that activate the stomach are probably also impaired. In my experience, the correlation of grossly abnormal R-R studies with demonstrable gastroparesis is very real.* Given the physical symptoms or the abnormal R-R study, your physician may want to consider further tests to evaluate your condition. The most sophisticated of these studies is the gamma-ray technetium scan. This test is performed at many medical centers, and is quite costly. It works this way: You eat some scrambled eggs to which a minute amount of radioactive technetium has been added. A gammaray camera trained on your abdomen measures (from outside your body) the low levels of radiation the technetium emits as the eggs pass from your stomach into your small intestine. If the gamma radiation drops off rapidly, the study is considered normal. A less precise study can be performed at much lower cost by any radiologist. This is called the barium hamburger test. In this test, you eat a pound hamburger and then drink a liquid that contains the heavy element barium. Every half hour or so, an X-ray photo is taken of your stomach. Since the barium shows up in these phot Continue reading >>

Barium Swallow (precare) - What You Need To Know

Barium Swallow (precare) - What You Need To Know

Aftercare Instructions Discharge Care Inpatient Care Precare En Espaol Barium swallow, or esophagram, is an x-ray procedure used to examine your esophagus. Liquid barium is a white, chalky solution that helps healthcare providers see the esophagus more clearly. The esophagus attaches your throat to your stomach. Write down the correct date, time, and location of your procedure. Arrange a ride home. Ask a family member or friend to drive you home after your surgery or procedure. Do not drive yourself home. Ask your caregiver if you need to stop using aspirin or any other prescribed or over-the-counter medicine before your procedure or surgery. Bring your medicine bottles or a list of your medicines when you see your caregiver. Tell your caregiver if you are allergic to any medicine. Tell your caregiver if you use any herbs, food supplements, or over-the-counter medicine. Tell the healthcare provider if you have ever had an allergic reaction to contrast solution. You may need blood, urine, or bowel movement tests before your procedure. You may also need a chest x-ray. Talk to your healthcare provider about these or other tests you may need. Write down the date, time, and location for each test. Ask your healthcare provider about directions for eating and drinking. Do not eat or drink dairy products. Limit sugar. You may need to drink clear liquids, such as gelatin, broth, or clear fruit juice. Do not eat or drink 12 hours before your procedure. Ask your caregiver before taking any medicine on the day of your procedure. These medicines include insulin, diabetic pills, high blood pressure pills, or heart pills. Bring a list of all the medicines you take, or your pill bottles, with you to the hospital. You or a close family member will be asked to sign a legal document call Continue reading >>

Contrast Agent Used In Cat Scan

Contrast Agent Used In Cat Scan

D.D. Family T1 Since 2006, Omnipod Since 2007 Anyone had experience with the effects of the contrast stuff they use for doing abdominal CAT scans ? i have not found out whats in it yet, but wondered if its likely to do crazy things to my BG Ok did some more research. oral contrast used for CT is Gastrografin - mixture of various things including several barium salts. I think the main issue here for non-pumpers would be the requirement to not eat for several hours. Wonder what flavor its going to be.... Last edited by hhinma; 6/17/08 at 06:32 PM. That's an interesting and excellent question. Please do let us know if/how it does effect your bg if you don't get an answer. I also wonder what the stuff you have to ingest for things like colonoscopy and other x-ray tests does to diabetics. I assume and hope the doctor requesting the tests takes the fact that you are diabetic and on a pump into consideration. But yeah, what is in there?? Moderator Type1 - Minimed 640G - Enlite CGM Hi Hhimna, I can't answer your question and looking at your profile I am guessing you are not on metformin... but thought I would bring this up anyway to play it safe. When having dyes & contrast in a medical procedure the metformin must be stopped before hand as it is dangerous to have these procedures done while on met. Like Karen has mentioned, make sure everyone knows that you are diabetic & what meds you are on. D.D. Family T1 41 years, paradigm 522 began 3/08 I have had two contrast MRI's. No appreciable change to bs was noticed. However, for those that have kidney impairment, the dye does stress the kidneys. Many of the MRI's and catscans can be performed without the dye, so be sure to discuss with your MD whether use of the dye is absolutely necessary. I hope the results of your scans turn o Continue reading >>

Barium Sulfate - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs - Everyday Health

Barium Sulfate - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs - Everyday Health

Barium sulfate is in a group of drugs called contrast agents. Barium sulfate works by coating the inside of your esophagus, stomach, or intestines which allows them to be seen more clearly on a CT scan or other radiologic (x-ray) examination. Barium sulfate is used to help diagnose certain disorders of the esophagus, stomach, or intestines. Barium sulfate may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding before your medical test. Also tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a contrast agent. You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to barium sulfate or another contrast agent. You may not be able to use barium sulfate if: you recently had surgery, an injury, or a biopsy involving your stomach, esophagus, or intestines; you recently had radiation treatment of your pelvic area; you recently had a perforation (a hole or tear) in your esophagus, stomach, or intestines; you have a bowel obstruction, severe constipation, ileum, or toxic megacolon; you have poor blood flow to your intestines (ischemia). To make sure barium sulfate is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: slow digestion, a blockage in your stomach or intestines; Hirschsprung's disease (a disorder of the intestines); a condition called pseudotumor cerebri (high pressure inside the skull that may cause headaches, vision loss, or other symptoms); a fistula (abnormal connection) between your esophagus and your trachea (windpipe); trouble swallowing, or if you have ever choked on food by accidentally inhaling it into your lungs; if you have recently had a rectal biopsy; if you are allergic to simethicone (Gas-X, Phazyme, and others); or It is not known whether barium sulfate will harm an unborn baby, but t Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis

A condition associated with diabetes, in which the emptying of the stomach is slowed. Normally, the digestion of food is facilitated by steady, rhythmic contractions of the stomach muscles that break down food into smaller particles. These muscle contractions are also what push food into the small intestine, where it is further digested and its nutrients absorbed. After having diabetes for many years, some people develop a condition known as diabetic autonomic neuropathy, in which the nerves that control automatic functions in the body, such as heartbeat and digestion, are damaged. If the vagus nerve, which controls the movement of food through the digestive tract, is damaged, the stomach and intestinal muscles may not function properly, and the passage of food through the digestive tract may be slowed. The most common symptoms of gastroparesis are heartburn, nausea, vomiting, bloating, and an early feeling of fullness when eating. Some other signs and symptoms include weight loss, erratic blood glucose levels, lack of appetite, gastroesophageal reflux (stomach contents backing up into the esophagus), and spasms of the stomach wall. When a doctor suspects gastroparesis based on a person’s symptoms, he may use one or more of the following tests to confirm it: In a barium x-ray test, a person fasts for 12 hours and then drinks a thick liquid containing barium, an element that appears bright white in x-rays. Normally, the stomach would be empty after a 12-hour fast, so if the x-ray reveals food in the stomach, the person is probably affected by gastroparesis. If no food shows up in the stomach but the doctor still suspects gastroparesis, the test may need to be repeated on another day since the rate of digestion may vary from day to day. In a barium beefsteak meal, a per Continue reading >>

Metformin And Contrast Media: Where Is The Conflict?

Metformin And Contrast Media: Where Is The Conflict?

Abstract Intravascular administration of iodinated contrast media to patients who are receiving metformin, an oral antidiabetic agent, can result in lactic acidosis. However, this rare complication occurs only if the contrast medium causes renal failure, and the patient continues to take metformin in the presence of renal failure. Because metformin is excreted primarily by the kidneys, continued intake of metformin after the onset of renal failure results in a toxic accumulation of this drug and subsequent lactic acidosis. To avoid this complication, metformin must be withheld after the administration of the contrast agent for 48 hours, during which the contrast-induced renal failure becomes clinically apparent. If renal function is normal at 48 hours, the metformin can be restarted. There is no scientific justification for withholding metformin for 48 hours before administration of the contrast medium, as currently recommended in the package insert. The authors review the pharmacology of metformin and present a departmental policy for managing patients with diabetes who receive metformin and who require intravascular administration of iodinated contrast media. Continue reading >>

Diabetesdiscussions > Metformin And Ct Scan

Diabetesdiscussions > Metformin And Ct Scan

Prior to having a CT scan this morning, I had to stop my metformin, take methylprednisolone 16 mg (because of asthma/allergies), drink 2 bottles (450 mL) of Berry Smoothie/Barium Sulfate Suspension, and no food. I also had a contrast injected for the scan. (I also stopped taking metformin the night before the scan.) Before drinking the barium sulfate, I checked my sugar level this morning (6:30 a.m.) and it was high, 186. (I took the Byetta and then drank the barium sulfate.) After the scan, went home, ate lunch, and checked my sugar level at 1:30 p.m. (2 hours later). It was 206. I checked it again at 2:00 p.m. (30 minutes later) and it was 237; at 3:00 p.m. it was down to 191. I can't take my metformin until after I have blood work to have my kidney function checked (hospital said not to have kidneys checked until two days after having the contrast/scan). If my numbers are good, then I can take the metformin again. Okay, here's my question: Is there anything I can do to keep my sugar levels in check without being on metformin? Thanks~ NJ, Byetta 10 mcg 2X/day, Metformin 1,000 mg 2X/day I wouldn't worry about not having the Metformin. Probably by tomorrow your numbers will be better. Having taken Prednisone and likely stressing over the tests it is not surprising about your numbers being high. They will come down. Hope you are drinking a lot of fluids to wash all that barium out and maybe some of the sugars too. People often say drinking water helps to lower their sugars. Hope all is well. Susan in NY Byetta 5 mcg x 2, Glipizide 5 mg X2, Metformin 1000 mg X2, Metoprolol 100 mg, HCTZ 12.5 mg, Lisinopril 20 mg, Zetia 10 mg, Omeprazole 40 mg Continue reading >>

Content Title Fetched

Content Title Fetched

2. Basic guideline for management of non insulin medication for short fast/minor surgery Refer to the Diabetes Team for advice if necessary IV insulin is not necessary for short procedures if a rapid recovery is expected and the patient is expected to eat following the procedure Consider hospital admission for frail/elderly and/or identified at risk patients Review and alter medication proactively if necessary to prevent problems with hypo/hyperglycaemia before, during and following procedure Monitor blood glucose levels appropriately to assess glycaemic control peri procedure Ensure appropriate treatment for hypoglycaemia is available Ensure prevention and management of hypoglycaemia is discussed with patients (and carers) prior to procedure Avoid insulin omission thereby reducing risk of diabetic ketoacidosis For patients who are prescribed Metformin see Radiological Procedures with Iodine Containing Contrast Exclude a contraindication (e.g. pancreatitis) before restarting a GLP-1 analogue (Liraglutide / Lixisenatide /Exenatide) Diabetes Specialist Nurses (Office hours Monday Friday) Ninewells Hospital - 01382 660111 ext. 32293/36009 Perth Royal Infirmary - 01382 660111 ext. 13476 Abbey Health Centre, Arbroath - 01241 447811 Diabetes Specialist Registrar - Page 5416 Ensure appropriate treatments for hypoglycaemia are available Take diabetes medication with food as prescribed before fast. Resume usual diabetes medication as prescribed with food following procedure GLP-1 analogues (e.g. Exenatide/ Liraglutide/Lixisenatide) slow gastric emptying Omit GLP-1 analogue during bowel preparation Before restarting GLP-1analogue Exclude any contraindication after procedure e.g. pancreatitis or active bowel disease Consider reduction in insulin dose (30 50%) prior to fast to red Continue reading >>

Barium Tests (swallow, Meal, Follow Through) | Patient

Barium Tests (swallow, Meal, Follow Through) | Patient

Some other points about barium X-ray tests Why is barium used during some X-ray tests? The gut (gastrointestinal tract) does not show up very well on ordinary X-ray pictures . However, if you drink a white liquid that contains a chemical called barium sulfate, the outline of the upper parts of the gut (oesophagus, stomach and small intestines) shows up clearly on X-ray pictures. This is because X-rays do not pass through barium. Depending on what part of your gut is being looked at, you may have one or more of the tests listed below. In each test, the barium coats the lining of the gut being tested. Therefore, abnormalities in the lining or structure of the gut can be seen on the X-ray pictures. In each of the following tests, several X-ray pictures are taken using low-dose X-rays. The total amount of radiation for each test is quite small and thought to be safe. The X-ray machine is usually linked to a TV monitor. Still pictures, or a video recording of X-ray pictures taken in quick succession, can be taken if necessary. In this test you drink some barium liquid. The barium liquid is often fruit-flavoured so it is pleasant to drink. You stand in front of an X-ray machine whilst X-ray pictures are taken as you swallow. This test aims to look for problems in the gullet (oesophagus). These include a narrowing (stricture), hiatus hernias , tumours , reflux from the stomach , disorders of swallowing , etc. You will usually be asked not to eat or drink for a few hours before this test. A barium swallow test takes about 10 minutes. This is similar to a barium swallow (above). However, it aims to look for problems in the stomach and the first part of the gut (small intestine), known as the duodenum. These problems may include ulcers , small fleshy lumps (polyps), tumours , et Continue reading >>

Barium Sulfate Suspension

Barium Sulfate Suspension

Barium sulfate suspension, often simply called barium, is a contrast agent used during X-rays . [1] Specifically it is used to improve visualization of the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, intestines) on plain X-ray or computed tomography . [2] It is taken by mouth or used rectally . [3] Side effects include constipation , diarrhea , appendicitis , and if inhaled inflammation of the lungs . [2] It is not recommended in people with intestinal perforation or bowel obstruction . [2] Allergic reactions are rare. [1] The use of barium during pregnancy is safe for the baby; however, X-rays may result in harm. [4] Barium sulfate suspension is typically made by mixing barium sulfate powder with water. [1] It is a non-iodinated contrast media . [5] Barium sulfate has been known since the Middle Ages . [6] In the United States it had come into common medical use by 1910. [7] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines , the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system . [8] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 37.80 to 79.33 USD per kilogram. [9] In the United States a course of treatment is not very expensive. [5] Some versions contain flavors to try to make it taste better. [1] Barium sulfate suspensions are provided by a radiologist or radiographer in advance of, or during a CT scan or fluoroscopic study to allow for better computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract . The patient is instructed to take nothing by mouth , which means to abstain from eating and drinking ( fasting ), with the exception of drinking the barium sulfate suspension. The amount of time for this fast may vary, depending on the instructions given by the imaging facility and the area of the body to be scanned, but generally lasts for Continue reading >>

Barium Swallow: What To Expect And Side Effects

Barium Swallow: What To Expect And Side Effects

If someone has a tumor , this will show up on the X-ray as an irregular outline that extends from the wall of the affected organ. People who are undergoing a barium swallow should not eat or drink for a few hours before the test. In some cases, the doctor may ask the person to stop taking medication before the test. Some hospitals recommend not chewing gum, eating mints, or smoking cigarettes after midnight the night before a barium swallow test. The test takes around 60 minutes and will take place in the X-ray department of the hospital. A person will need to change into a hospital gown. People can bring a friend or relative for support. However, the companion will not be able to join them in the X-ray room. In the X-ray room, the person drinks the barium liquid. It often has a chalky taste but can sometimes be flavored. A person will lie on a tilting table for part of the examination. In some cases, a person will be given an injection to relax their stomach. A person will be standing for some parts of the examination, and lying down on a tilting table for other parts. This allows the liquid to travel through the body, and for the radiologist and radiographer to take a selection of images. People do not have to stay in hospital after the test and are free to go home as soon as it is complete. The results usually arrive within 1-2 weeks. Patients may feel nauseous after a barium swallow test or become constipated. Drinking lots of fluids can help to relieve constipation . Symptoms of nausea should improve as the barium passes through the system. It is normal for people to have white-colored stools the first few times they use the toilet after having a barium swallow test. Some people might worry about being exposed to radiation as part of the X-ray process. However, th Continue reading >>

Pet/ct Fdg Scan For Patients With Diabetes

Pet/ct Fdg Scan For Patients With Diabetes

​​​​​​​​​DOWNLOADABLE PDF: English | Chinese | Ru​ssian | ​​Spanish​ This handout gives special instructions for patients with diabetes who are having a PET/CT FDG scan at UW Medical Center, Harborview Medical Center, or Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Your doctor has ordered an exam for you called a PET/CT FDG scan. Please ask for the handout called “PET/CT FDG Scan” if you do not already have it. PET stands for positron emission tomography. CT stands for computed tomography. FDG stands for 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-Glucose. This exam uses Fluorine-18 FDG, a radioactive tracer that acts like glucose in the body. The tracer helps us see how much energy your cells are using. We measure this with a FDG PET/CT scan. A PET/CT camera takes 2 types of pictures: The PET scan shows where the radioactive tracer has collected in your body. The CT scan provides pictures of your body structures. Together, the PET and CT images help your doctor see changes in your cells. How to Prepare People with diabetes have trouble processing glucose. This means you need to follow special instructions for your scan. Closely follow all instructions in this handout. This will help keep your blood sugar under control and give us the clearest results from this exam. Call your diabetes care provider 2 weeks before your scan to talk about the best way to prepare for your scan. Review the instructions in this handout with this provider. Do not exercise for 48 hours before your scan appointment. Starting 12 hours before your scan, do not take any dextrose medicines by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) or intravenous (IV) line. Starting 12 hours before your appointment time, you cannot eat or drink. You may only drink plain water during this 12-hour fast. Your scan will be early Continue reading >>

Positron Emission Tomography (pet Scan)

Positron Emission Tomography (pet Scan)

Positron emission tomography (PET or PET scan) is a specialized radiology procedure used to examine various body tissues to identify certain conditions. PET may also be used to follow the progress of the treatment of certain conditions. While PET is most commonly used in the fields of neurology, oncology, and cardiology, applications in other fields are currently being studied. PET is a type of nuclear medicine procedure. This means that a small amount of a radioactive substance, called a radionuclide (radiopharmaceutical or radiotracer), is used to perform the procedure. Specifically, PET studies evaluate the metabolism of a particular organ or tissue, so that information about the physiology (functionality) and anatomy (structure) of the organ or tissue is evaluated, as well as its biochemical properties. Thus, PET may detect biochemical changes in an organ or tissue that can identify the onset of a disease process before anatomical changes related to the disease can be seen with other imaging processes, such as computed tomography (CT scan) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) . PET is most often used by oncologists (doctors specializing in cancer treatment), neurologists and neurosurgeons (doctors specializing in treatment and surgery of the brain and nervous system), and cardiologists (doctors specializing in the treatment of the heart). However, as advances in PET technologies continue, this procedure is beginning to be used more widely in other areas. PET is also being used in conjunction with other diagnostic tests such as computed tomography (CAT scan) to provide more definitive information about malignant (cancerous) tumors and other lesions. The combination of PET and CT shows particular promise in the diagnosis and treatment ofmany types ofcancer. Until rece Continue reading >>

264 Spike With Readi-cat2

264 Spike With Readi-cat2

HORRIBLE! I had to drink two containers of Readi-CAT 2 this morning (2 cups each, 4 hrs apart) in preparation for an abdominal CAT scan. Finished drinking at 9 AM, scan ~9:15, then modest high protein/low carb breakfast ~10. To appreciate how bad that is, my current 1-mo 2-hr post measures are: average=120.7, with a 95% range of 'true' average = 114 to 127 (achieved by working really hard on diet & exercise). Has anyone else had that experience? I bet Readi-CAT2 has loads and loads and loads of sugar & who knows what else, to make it palatable. We diabetics deserve a low-sugar barium sulfate prep solution. Does anyone know of any such brands. Too late for me this round, but given the incidence of diabetes & increasing use of CT scans for diagnostic testing, there really should be a low-carb version. I am pretty sure it was the predinsone that raised your BG to such heights since predinsone is known to do that. I am glad your BG are back to their usual numbers and yes predinsone has some nasty side effects. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes