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Does Atenolol Cause Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes And Beta-blockers, What You Should Know

Type 2 Diabetes And Beta-blockers, What You Should Know

Type 2 Diabetes and Beta-Blockers, What You Should Know By Deborah Mitchell G+ Nov 12 2012 - 8:37am When you think about risk factors for type 2 diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, and inactivity may come to mind. One lesser known factor is use of beta-blockers, but not all of the drugs in this class may raise the chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Some beta-blockers increase diabetes risk Beta-blockers (aka, beta-adrenergic blocking agents or beta antagonists) have been on the market for about six decades. The first clinically beneficial beta-blocker to enter the market was propranolol, which was prescribed to treat angina pectoris, a condition in which the heart's need for oxygen exceeds the available supply. Since then, propranolol and other beta-blockers have been developed and prescribed most often for arrhythmias (abnormal heart rhythms), atrial fibrillation (irregular heart rhythms), high blood pressure, and heart attack, and less often for migraines, anxiety, overactive thyroid, and glaucoma. Beta-blockers work by slowing the heart beat and reducing contractions of blood vessels in the heart, brain, and throughout the body. According to cardiologist Ragaendra R. Baliga at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, "Studies show that older beta- blockers can increase a patient's risk of type 2 diabetes by more than 25 percent." While raising the risk of diabetes is not good for anyone, it is especially damaging for individuals who already have conditions that affect the heart and vascular system. In a recent issue of Heart Failure Clinics, Baliga explained that "older beta-blockers are doubled-edged swords. They save lives, but you want to avoid complications down the road, like diabetes." When some beta-blockers are used for a long time, they may Continue reading >>

Effect Of Beta - Blockers On Insulin Resistancein Patients With Hypertension And Metabolicsyndrome After 6 Months Of Treatment

Effect Of Beta - Blockers On Insulin Resistancein Patients With Hypertension And Metabolicsyndrome After 6 Months Of Treatment

Effect of Beta - Blockers on Insulin Resistancein Patients with Hypertension and MetabolicSyndrome after 6 Months of Treatment Yuriy Sirenko1*, Oksana Rekovets2, Olena Torbas3, Sergey Savitskiy4 and Evgenia Pavlyuk5 1Professor, Head of the Department of Symptomatic Arterial Hypertension State Institution National scientific center The M.D. Strazhesko Institute of Cardiology AMS Ukraine. 2Senior research assistant of the Department of Symptomatic Arterial Hypertension State Institution National scientific center The M.D. Strazhesko Institute of Cardiology AMS Ukraine. 3Research assistant of the Department of Symptomatic Arterial Hypertension State Institution National scientific center The M.D. Strazhesko Institute of Cardiology AMS Ukraine. 4Professor Department of the Radioisotope State Institution National scientific center The M.D. Strazhesko Institute of Cardiology AMS Ukraine. 5Research assistant department of Symptomatic Arterial Hypertension State Institution National scientific center The M.D. Strazhesko Institute of Cardiology AMS Ukraine. *Corresponding author: Dr. Yuriy Sirenko, MD, PhD, Prof. Head of Department of Symptomatic Arterial Hypertension, Institute of cardiology, Kiev, Ukraine; Tel: +380958424521; E-mail: Received: April 03, 2017;Accepted: April 15, 2017; Published: May 05, 2017 Citation: Yuriy Sirenko, et.al. (2017)Effect of Beta - Blockers on Insulin Resistance in Patients with Hypertension and Metabolic Syndrome after 6 Months of Treatment. J Endocrinol Diab. 3(6): 1-11. DOI: Background:For years the use of beta-blockers in patients with metabolic syndrome has been limited due to the negative impact of non-selective beta - blockers on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Aim:We studied antihypertensive therapy with different beta - blockers over Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure And Erectile Dysfunction (ed)

High Blood Pressure And Erectile Dysfunction (ed)

To treat erectile dysfunction (ED), you have to lower high blood pressure. Some people are able to do that through lifestyle changes alone. Others need help from prescription high blood pressure medication. A problem for many men, though, is that some types of blood pressure drugs can cause erectile dysfunction. That may make it tough to stay on medication, especially if high blood pressure never caused any symptoms before. An estimated 70% of men who have side effects from high blood pressure medicine stop taking it. While many drugs used to treat high blood pressure have been linked to erectile dysfunction, some are much less likely than others to cause problems. Certain high blood pressure drugs may even improve erectile dysfunction for some men. It's known that diuretics (or water pills, like hydrochlorothiazide) and beta-blockers (like Atenolol) can also cause erection problems. These are also the first drugs that a doctor is likely to prescribe if you are not able to lower your high blood pressure through diet and exercise. If you take a diuretic, you should stay on it until high blood pressure is under control. If erection problems persist, or blood pressure goes back up, then your doctor might switch to a drug that's less likely to cause erectile dysfunction. Or, a combination of medications might work better to control high blood pressure and lower the risk of erectile dysfunction. If you take a beta blocker, you may also want to ask your doctor if it might cause erectile dysfunction. You might be better off on a medication less likely to cause a problem. Some families of high blood pressure drugs rarely cause ED as a side effect. They include: Alpha-blockers ARBs ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors -- such as Capoten, Lotensin, Prinivil, and Zestril Continue reading >>

Glyburide: Medlineplus Drug Information

Glyburide: Medlineplus Drug Information

Glyburide is used along with diet and exercise, and sometimes with other medications, to treat type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). Glyburide is in a class of medications called sulfonylureas. Glyburide lowers blood sugar by causing the pancreas to produce insulin (a natural substance that is needed to break down sugar in the body) and helping the body use insulin efficiently. This medication will only help lower blood sugar in people whose bodies produce insulin naturally. Glyburide is not used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or diabetic ketoacidosis (a serious condition that may occur if high blood sugar is not treated). Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Taking medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Glyburide comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day with breakfast or the first main meal of the day. However, in some cases your doctor may tell you Continue reading >>

Drug Induced Diabetes

Drug Induced Diabetes

Tweet A number of medications have side effects which include the raising of blood glucose levels. Drug induced diabetes is when use of a specific medication has lead to the development of diabetes. In some cases the development of diabetes may be reversible if use of the medication is discontinued, but in other cases drug-induced diabetes may be permanent. Drug induced diabetes is a form of secondary diabetes, in other words diabetes that is a consequence of having another health condition. Which drugs can induce diabetes? A number of drugs have been linked with an increased risk development of type 2 diabetes. Corticosteroids Thiazide diuretics Beta-blockers Antipsychotics Is diabetes permanent? Diabetes may not be permanent but this can depend on other health factors. With some medications, blood glucose levels may return back to normal once the medication is stopped but, in some cases, the development of diabetes may be permanent. Managing drug induced diabetes If you need to continue taking the medication that has brought on diabetes, it may make your diabetes more difficult to control than would otherwise be the case. If you are able to stop the course of medication, you may find your blood glucose levels become slightly easier to manage. Following a healthy diet and meeting the recommended exercise guidelines will help to improve your chances of managing your blood glucose levels. Can drug induced diabetes be prevented? It may be possible to reduce the risk of developing diabetes by ensuring you to keep to a healthy lifestyle whilst you are on the medication. Being on smaller doses of the medication or shorter periods of time may help to reduce the likelihood of developing high blood sugar levels and diabetes. Doctors will usually try to put you on the smallest e Continue reading >>

Blood Pressure And Diabetes

Blood Pressure And Diabetes

This page is best viewed printed out. If you are a patient you can take this to your practice nurse so it can be used for ideas. Why do you need a blood pressure of 130/80? Complications from diabetes develop much more quickly if blood pressure is high. This is illustrated in the graph opposite, from the UKPDS £23 million study. Lifestyle has a major impact on blood pressure, but medication is generally needed. Each 1 mmHg of blood pressure rise causes a 1.2% increase in the number of problems. In practice for instance, if you have diabetic maculopathy, a serious form of retinopathy, you need a very low blood pressure to stop (or slow down) your sight getting worse. Unfortunately some people become ill if their blood pressure is too low (dizzy, occaional falls), so like everything else in diabetes, the blood pressure is a balance. The balance is between keeping well and avoiding diabetic problems, versus the side effects of the tablets, too low a blood pressure and becoming dizzy, and too many trips to the doctor. Worldwide, blood pressure is undertreated see . Long term control is needed (NEJM 2008). also. Candersartan reduced retinopathy progression by 18-34% (BMJ 10) DIRECT . White coat hypertension does contribute to retinopathy and does need treatment 2008. Some ethnic groups such as Afro-Carribeans seem to retain more salt, and this causes much higher blood pressures. Each 1mm of blood pressure increases risk 5% (NEJM 2009). Treatment is important even in the very elderly BMJ12 BMJ12. <120 is harmful 2012. BP 130 (2012). General 2012. Take control of your blood pressure If you have high blood pressure, take control. Buy a machine (in Birmingham, Lloyds Chemists sell good machines for ~£15). If your blood pressure is high and you are trying to lower it, check the Continue reading >>

Nine Drugs

Nine Drugs

I recently received an e-mail alerting me to a webpage discussing “9 Common Drugs That Every Diabetic Should Avoid Mixing With Their Meds.” It was such an intriguing title that I Googled the phrase, and found that several websites had exactly the same list I totally disagree with the author’s premise that people with diabetes (PWD) should avoid the medications on the list; in fact, all of these medications are reasonable for PWD to take, if their physician and/or pharmacist explains the issues involved. Here’s the original information (including some poor grammar and miscapitalizations), plus my comment for each: Beta Blockers: Beta-blockers, such as Lopressor (metoprolol), Tenormin (Atenolol), and Inderal (propanolol), have been known to reduce the release of insulin. The main concern for PWD with the use of beta-blockers, which are very useful drugs for the treatment of hypertension and heart disease, is that they might mask some of the symptoms of hypoglycemia. If you are prone to hypoglycemia, you could expect your usual symptoms relating to pounding heart and shakiness to be blunted while on beta-blockers. Minoxidil: Minoxidil, a direct vasodilator, has a tendency to raise blood glucose levels. See my comment after this list… Thiazide Diuretics: Thiazide diuretics include such drugs as Diuril (Chlorothiazide), Zaroxolyn (Metolazone), and Oretic (Hydrochlorothiazide), and is known to raise glucose levels due to its effect it has on causing the loss of potassium. See my comment after this list… Calcium channel blockers: Calcium channel blockers, which are prescribed for Hypertension, management of Angina include such drugs as Calan (Verapamil), Adalat (Nifedipine),and Norvasc (Amlodipine), and is known to reduce the secretion of insulin. I’m not sure wh Continue reading >>

Other Dangerous Drugs For People With Diabetes

Other Dangerous Drugs For People With Diabetes

A major problem with all drugs is that busy doctors often ignore potentially damaging drug side effects. Often they aren't even aware that these side effects are listed in the drug's official FDA-required label (called the "Prescribing Information" online.). That is because most doctors get their information about drugs from reps sent out by pharmaceutical companies or doctors who are well-compensated by these companies to promote the latest, most expensive drugs to their peers. Unfortunately, all the major drug companies have a long record of suppressing information about damaging side effects of all their drugs. Periodically, one of these drugs will kill or injure enough people that it comes to the attention of the FDA and the media. Even then, the FDA will usually only post an "alert" and will allow the drug to continue to be sold. Busy doctors apparently don't read these alerts, as they continue to prescribe drugs that have generated serious alerts in quantities that result in billions of dollars of drug company revenue each year. Proof that doctors are woefully ignorant of the side effects of even the most heavily prescribed drugs was provided by this study: Physician Response to Patient Reports of Adverse Drug Effects: Implications For Patient-Targeted Adverse Effect Surveillance.Golomb, Beatrice A, et al. Drug Safety. 30(8):669-675, 2007. TIt was a study of a group of patients prescribed a statin drug that verified that doctors ignore patients' reports of even the most significant side effects. As reported, it found that Eighty-seven percent of patients reportedly spoke to their physician about the possible connection between statin use and their symptom....Physicians were reportedly more likely to deny than affirm the possibility of a connection. Rejection of a Continue reading >>

Atenolol And Type 2 Diabetes

Atenolol And Type 2 Diabetes

I am taking 25 mg of atenolol and am type 2 diabetic. I have been reading that perhaps diabetics should be taking some other med for BP other than atenolol. If so, what med should it be. Any help???? I saw your post on the diabetes board and responded. I'll post same here too. I can only tell you what I've read (latest JNC-7 Report and other studies recently published in JAMA and LANCET). The recommendations for treatment of hypertension in adults with Type 2 diabetes in general seem to be ever-changing. However, last May in the JNC Report, treatment targets were lowered (doctors now aim for blood pressure less than 130/80 mmHg for diabetics, although many physicians feel that a systolic # of 135 is a more realistic goal and reasonable). With or without associated diabetic nephropathy, physicians are tending more and more to therapy with ACE inhibitors or ARBs as first-line therapy for hypertension in diabetics in general. Other drugs should be used as circumstances and side effects dictate, obviously. Studies that compare drug classes do not suggest that there are obvious superior agents. However, most conclude that thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBS like Diovan, Atacand, Benicar), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may be the preferred first-line agents for treatment of hypertension in Type 2 diabetes. Beta-Blockers (like Atenolol) and calcium-channel blockers are more effective than placebo, but they may not be as effective as diuretics, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, or ACE inhibitors. However, study results are inconsistent and there's still a lot of on-going discussion in the medical community. Sometimes other agents are necessary to achieve optimum BP goals. You are on a beta blocker only. Is it keeping your BP at 130/8 Continue reading >>

How Diabetics Taking Beta Blockers Still Sweat With Hypoglycemia

How Diabetics Taking Beta Blockers Still Sweat With Hypoglycemia

There are 23.6 million children and adults (7.8 percent of the population) in the United States alone that have diabetes mellitus (DM).1 Unfortunately, 65 percent of the deaths in diabetic patients are due to heart disease and stroke. In fact, adults with DM are 2 to 4 times more likely to have heart disease and/or a stroke than adults without diabetes.2 The elevated cardiovascular risk in diabetics is partially due to the high prevalence (about 73 percent of all diabetics) of hypertension (defined as > 130/80 mm Hg) for which treatment with beta blockers is indicated. 2 Thus, the use of beta blocking agents is relatively common in those living with DM. Beta blockers, such as atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Toprol; Toprol XL), carvedilol (Coreg; Coreg CR) and many others, are known to be antagonists of the noradrenergic response that results from the release of catecholamines by the sympathetic nervous system.4-6 The sympathetic branch of the autonomic system is activated primarily during an acute stress response ("fight or flight") and releases the predominant neurotransmitter, norepinephrine, from post-ganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers.7,8 In addition, the sympathetic nervous system also causes the adrenal glands to release both epinephrine (80%) and norepinephrine (20%). Norepinephrine and epinephrine may then activate the adrenergic receptors of various organs, such as beta-1 receptors in the heart which results in tachycardia (increase pulse).7,8 This acute stress response can be activated by hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) which may occur episodically in diabetic patients. Hypoglycemia generally occurs in diabetics when the blood glucose level falls below 70 mg/dL and is most often observed in patients receiving insulin or those being treated with tight glucose Continue reading >>

Blood Pressure Control In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Blood Pressure Control In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) and essential hypertension are common conditions that are frequently present together. Both are considered risk factors for cardiovascular disease and microvascular complications and therefore treatment of both conditions is essential. Many papers were published on blood pressure (BP) targets in diabetic patients, including several works published in the last 2 years. As a result, guidelines differ in their recommendations on BP targets in diabetic patients. The method by which to control hypertension, whether pharmacological or non-pharmacological, is also a matter of debate and has been extensively studied in the literature. In recent years, new medications were introduced for the treatment of DM, some of which also affect BP and the clinician treating hypertensive and diabetic patients should be familiar with these medications and their effect on BP. In this manuscript, we discuss the evidence supporting different BP targets in diabetics and review the various guidelines on this topic. In addition, we discuss the various options available for the treatment of hypertension in diabetics and the recommendations for a specific treatment over the other. Finally we briefly discuss the new diabetic drug classes and their influence on BP. Continue reading >>

Medication Warnings

Medication Warnings

Certain veterinary medications for other conditions may seriously affect diabetic patients. Always check with your nurse before taking. This list is provided because some of these medications don't mention their side effects on diabetics in their literature. Many drugs used in veterinary medicine are also used in human medicine under a differently-trademarked name. Learning the human pharma name (if applicable) or generic name of the drug (same in veterinary & human medicine) can often give you additional information regarding possible side effects and how the drug may affect patients with diabetes. Human pharma drugs provide this information--for some reason, veterinary drugs don't always. If you are considering alternative or herbal medicine for your diabetic pet, see also Alternative medication warnings. Xylitol, a common artificial sweetener, lowers blood sugar dangerously in dogs and sometimes humans, possibly also cats. Some prescription and over-the counter medications, including vitamins and supplements which are made for human use contain Xylitol. Reading labels thoroughly and asking your vet can prevent needless tragedies. Heartworm [8][9] is a global problem, with areas on all continents except Antarctica affected and is a disease that is far easier to prevent than to cure. It can affect both cats and dogs[10][11][12][13]. Should your pet be affected by this, a talk with your vet is in order. Increasing insulin doses to counter this temporary situation may cause hypoglycemia once the systemic medication level has lowered. The phenomenon also does not mean your pet has ceased to respond to the insulin you currently use. Since there are no formal label warnings, he/she needs to be aware that there are temporary side effects for these drugs which apply to some d Continue reading >>

Can Hydrochlorothiazine And Simvastatin Cause Diabetes?

Can Hydrochlorothiazine And Simvastatin Cause Diabetes?

Our pharmacist answers the latest question regarding the possibility of hydrochlorothiazide and simvastatin causing diabetes. I am taking simvastatin 10mg, lisinopril/Hctz 20/25mg, and atenolol 25mg. I have recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Can taking these drugs be part of the cause. I do have a family history of diabetes and am overweight. I go to the gym 5 times a week. Answer Out of the medications you listed, both simvastatin and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) have been known to cause an increase in blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and a possible increased likelihood of developing diabetes. In many of the studies that have been done regarding the issue, it's always been tough to conclude that either is a significant CAUSE of diabetes since patients that are hypertensive and have high cholesterol are statistically more likely to have diabetes anyway, regardless if they are taking something that is known to cause an increase in blood sugar. Let's tackle each drug separately. The class that HCTZ is in, known as thiazide diuretics, is linked with an increased the risk of hyperglycemia and in fact, with new-onset diabetes. It's very possible that HCTZ could be a contributing factor to your newly diagnosed diabetes. Having said that, thiazide diuretics are only considered a small risk factor for diabetes and typically if the medication were to be stopped or never taken, many patients would develop diabetes at some point in their lives anyway if they were at significant risk for it. Medical guidelines and recommendations are somewhat muddled when it comes to thiazide diuretics and diabetes. The top two guidelines for hypertension treatment in diabetics come from Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure and the Continue reading >>

Antihypertensive Medications And Blood Sugar: Theories And Implications

Antihypertensive Medications And Blood Sugar: Theories And Implications

Go to: MECHANISMS OF ADVERSE GLYCEMIC EFFECTS Various theories about the mechanisms of antihypertensive-induced glycemic defects have been postulated. Few of these theories have been confirmed and some are conflicting. In general, postulated mechanisms can be classified into four categories: effects on peripheral blood flow, effects on the insulin receptor, effects on the liver and effects on insulin release (Figure 1). Improved peripheral blood flow to skeletal muscles is thought to facilitate glucose disposal to the tissues. In this way, medications such as alpha-blockers, which promote peripheral vasodilation, may improve insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake (20). Through the same mechanism, ACEIs or ARBs may improve insulin sensitivity by reducing angiotensin II-mediated vasoconstriction and/or increasing vasodilators such as bradykinin, prostaglandins or nitric oxide (21,22). Conversely, medications that reduce peripheral blood flow could direct blood away from sites of glucose uptake, reducing glucose disposal (20). Nonselective beta-blockers limit peripheral blood flow by reducing cardiac output, a beta-1-mediated effect, and preventing peripheral vasodilation, a beta-2-mediated effect (20,23). Beta-blockers with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity are less likely than nonselective agents to reduce peripheral blood flow because of neutral or stimulatory effects on beta-2 receptors (20,23). Therefore, these agents may have a reduced impact on glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity compared with nonselective beta-blockers. Cardioselective beta-blockers are also less likely to reduce peripheral blood flow than nonselective agents; however, cardioselective beta-blockers still exhibit some glycemic adverse effects (23). In support of the blood flow hypothesis is th Continue reading >>

Atenolol - A Beta-blocker Tenormin

Atenolol - A Beta-blocker Tenormin

Combination brands: Tenoret and Tenoretic (atenolol with chlortalidone), Beta-Adalat and Tenif (atenolol with nifedipine) Atenolol belongs to the group of medicines referred to as beta-blockers. It is a medicine which works on the heart and blood vessels. It does this by blocking tiny areas (called beta-adrenergic receptors) where messages sent by some nerves are received by your heart and blood vessels. As a result, your heart beats more slowly and with less force. The pressure of blood within your blood vessels is reduced and it is easier for your heart to pump blood around your body. These actions are of benefit if you have high blood pressure (hypertension) , or to prevent abnormally fast heart rhythms if you have arrhythmias . Because your heart is using less energy, it also helps to reduce chest pain if you have angina . Atenolol is also available in combination with other medicines used to treat high blood pressure and angina. Combination brands of atenolol with a 'water tablet' (diuretic) called chlortalidone are Tenoret and Tenoretic (this combination also goes by the name co-tenidone). Combination brands of atenolol with the calcium-channel blocker nifedipine, are Beta-Adalat and Tenif. Atenolol can also be prescribed to help prevent migraine. The leaflet does not contain information about this use of atenolol. If you have been given it for this reason, please ask your doctor if you have any questions about your treatment. Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine can only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking atenolol it is important that your doctor knows: If you have asthma or any other breathing disorder. If you have any problems with the way your kidneys work. If you Continue reading >>

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