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Doctors No Longer Prescribe Metformin

Why Doctors In The Know No Longer Prescribe Metformin - Health Journal

Why Doctors In The Know No Longer Prescribe Metformin - Health Journal

Urgent news about Metformin #1 Lie About Diabetes Meds Metformin Side Effects Until recently, diabetics looking for doctor-approved, drug-free treatment options were out of luck. Type II Diabetes sufferers may soon be tossing their test strips, lancet needles, and prescription pills. But a growing number of health experts believe those days are behind us. A discovery by an Austin-based doctor may change how Type II Diabetes is treated and could even be a cure. Dr. Marlene Merritt suffered from high blood sugar for years and was determined to find a natural solution. My motivation, she says, was to cast off the shackles of the daily monitoring, the shots and pills, and the drug side effects. I wanted to live a normal life again. After two years of research and trial and error experiments, Dr. Marlene Merritt hit upon a practical diet and exercise regimen that doesnt just control Type II Diabetes but actually reverses it. While the regimen eliminates a few foods, it most importantly adds a single food that has shown to have a big impact on the disease. The announcement of her discovery has sent shockwaves through the medical community, with some progressive doctors enthusiastically embracing it, and many conventional doctors taking a wait and see approach. Within weeks of adopting her own regimen, Dr. Merritts condition completely reversed. It was just gone, and I had my life back, she says. I then prescribed this drug-free solution to my diabetic patients and, in most cases, they too saw success in a matter of weeks. Dr. Marlene Merritt (LAc, DOM(NM), MS Nutrition), an Austin-based doctor who used to suffer high blood sugar herself, made a recent announcement that is sending shockwaves through the medical community. Dr. Merritt knew all too well that commonly-prescribed Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin

Glyburide And Metformin

Pronunciation: GLYE bure ide and met FOR min Brand: Glucovance Glucovance 1.25 mg-250 mg What is the most important information I should know about glyburide and metformin? You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease or are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glyburide and metformin. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is glyburide and metformin? Glyburide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glyburide and metformin is used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medicine is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glyburide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking glyburide and metformin? You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to glyburide or metformin, or: if you have severe kidney disease; if you are also using bosentan (to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension); or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glyburide and metformin. Some people taking metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. This may be more likely Continue reading >>

Forget The Blood Of Teens. This Pill Promises To Extend Life For A Nickel A Pop

Forget The Blood Of Teens. This Pill Promises To Extend Life For A Nickel A Pop

Nir Barzilai has a plan. It’s a really big plan that might one day change medicine and health care as we know it. Its promise: extending our years of healthy, disease-free living by decades. And Barzilai knows about the science of aging. He is, after all, the director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. And, as such, he usually talks about his plan with the caution of a seasoned researcher. Usually. Truth is, Barzilai is known among his colleagues for his excitability—one author says he could pass as the older brother of Austin Powers—and sometimes he can’t help himself. Like the time he referred to his plan—which, among other things, would demonstrate that human aging can be slowed with a cheap pill—as “history-making.” In 2015, he stood outside of the offices of the Food and Drug Administration, flanked by a number of distinguished researchers on aging, and likened the plan to a journey to “the promised land.” Last spring, Barzilai traveled to the Vatican to discuss the plan at a conference on cellular therapies. It was the second time he’d been invited to the conference, which is a pretty big deal in the medical world. At the last one, in 2013, he appeared alongside a dwarf from Ecuador, a member of a community of dwarfs whose near immunity to diabetes and cancer has attracted the keen interest of researchers. The 2016 conference featured a number of the world’s top cancer scientists and included addresses from Pope Francis and Joe Biden. That Barzilai was invited was a sign not only of his prominence in his field but also of how far aging research, once relegated to the periphery of mainstream science, has come in recent years. That progress has been spurred by huge investments from Sil Continue reading >>

How To Slow Aging Now: What Your Doctor Won’t Tell You

How To Slow Aging Now: What Your Doctor Won’t Tell You

Most articles that find themselves under such a headline are not based in good science. Products promising long life and physical transformation usually generate profit and disappointment in equal parts. The eternal success of such sales represents a triumph of hope over experience, a very large category in the human playbook. The following story however is grounded in good data that has not yet trickled down the slow and meandering path from research laboratory to clinical specialist to mainstream medicine to its ultimate target: you. The anti-aging medicine is metformin, a drug that has been prescribed for Type 2 diabetes since the 1960s. This is the type of diabetes caused by obesity and lack of physical activity. Some 95 percent of all diabetes in the United States is Type 2. Metformin increases insulin sensitivity, decreases glucose production in the liver, increases glucose uptake in muscle and induces weight loss in large part by reducing body fat. It does this with remarkable efficacy, low risk of hypoglycemia and a surprisingly clean side effect profile. Not bad, eh? And we haven’t gotten to the good stuff yet. Why would a drug for diabetes have the ability to increase life span and prevent age-related disease? Diabetes provides a model of accelerated aging. Impaired wound healing, cataract, and cardiovascular damage are manifestations of both diabetes and aging. Recent research suggests diabetes also increases the risk for cancer, a disease associated with aging. Elevated blood levels of both glucose and insulin appear to up the tempo of growing old. Over the past decade a growing literature has documented the protective effects of metformin on a broad spectrum of age-related disorders and on lifespan. This includes cancer. Diabetics treated with metformin h Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Drug That Could Be An Anti-aging Miracle

The Diabetes Drug That Could Be An Anti-aging Miracle

In a slew of recent flashy endeavors, scientists, academics and exceptionally rich people have taken on the aging process. In 2013, Google launched Calico, its billion-dollar anti-aging research and development arm, which the following year formed a partnership with pharmaceutical giant AbbVie. Meanwhile, another major drug company, Novartis, is developing a patentable form of rapamycin—a biological agent discovered in the soil on Easter Island—which has been shown to boost immune function, and the company hopes it could become the first viable anti-aging pill. But, according to Dr. Nir Barzilai, a scientist based in the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City’s Bronx borough, we might already have the drug we need to slow the aging process—and it’s dirt cheap. Metformin is an old, generic diabetes drug, known for its blood sugar–lowering properties and for being quite safe. It’s common, and it costs about 35 cents per pill. It has also been found to stall the aging process in animal studies. In June, Barzilai, along with academics from the not-for-profit American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR), approached the Food and Drug Administration with an idea: the Targeting Aging With Metformin (TAME) study, to see if metformin could do for humans what it does for animals. It would be the first clinical trial to test if a drug could slow human aging. The FDA said yes, and since that June meeting the media has exploded with excitement over the purported “fountain of youth” drug, with rumors that it could extend human life span up to 120 years. The problem, though, is that no one has agreed to front the capital required to get TAME off the ground. That’s not surprising: There are plenty of reasons Big Pharma won’t fund a study that would m Continue reading >>

Here’s Why Doctors Have Stopped Prescribing Metformin

Here’s Why Doctors Have Stopped Prescribing Metformin

We are quickly approaching the day when people diagnosed with Type II Diabetes can kiss goodbye to their expensive pills and annoying needles and test strips. This is thanks to a breakthrough from a Sri Lankan researcher, a specialist in endocrinology with 23 years’ experience, that is going to change everything we thought we knew about how to treat Type II Diabetes... No more needles! Would you be willing to try a "Delicious Dish"or even a "Miracle Smoothie" that could solve the problem of diabetes naturally? Mr. Michel Dempsey, in a brave (and lucky) attempt to save his wife from diabetes discovered a Sri Lankan tribe that has 0 cases of diabetes or pre diabetes. Against all odds he was able, with the help of a Sri Lankan researcher from the university of Peradeniya, to develop a natural treatment to reverse diabetes using the exact same ingredients the tribe has been consuming for decades. He said that he just couldn't see the mother of his 3 children unable to cast off the shackles of diabetes. He wanted to find a better future for her. Now, several years of research, study and experiments later, Chaminda, the Sri Lankan researcher, has discovered a surprisingly simple way to stop diabetes and even reverse it, giving you back the life you had before. The method involves doing away with the foods that are making the problem worse, and replacing them with ingredients and superfood that has doctors baffled. This new method was met with harsh criticism from the medical community and pharmaceutical companies, but he was never criticised by those who actually try it; most of them experienced success in just a few weeks. Michel says that this method has proven results, and these results can speak for themselves. By now you’re probably wondering why you’ve never heard Continue reading >>

Should Sulfonylureas Remain An Acceptable First-line Add-on To Metformin Therapy In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes? No, It’s Time To Move On!

Should Sulfonylureas Remain An Acceptable First-line Add-on To Metformin Therapy In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes? No, It’s Time To Move On!

Since their introduction to clinical practice in the 1950s, sulfonylureas have been widely prescribed for use in patients with type 2 diabetes. Of all the other medications currently available for clinical use, only metformin has been used more frequently. However, several new drug classes have emerged that are reported to have equal glucose-lowering efficacy and greater safety when added to treatment of patients in whom metformin monotherapy is no longer sufficient. Moreover, current arguments also suggest that the alternative drugs may be superior to sulfonylureas with regard to the risk of cardiovascular complications. Thus, while there is universal agreement that metformin should remain the first-line pharmacologic therapy for those in whom lifestyle modification is insufficient to control hyperglycemia, there is no consensus as to which drug should be added to metformin. Therefore, given the current controversy, we provide a Point-Counterpoint on this issue. In the preceding point narrative, Dr. Abrahamson provides his argument suggesting that avoiding use of sulfonylureas as a class of medication as an add-on to metformin is not appropriate as there are many patients whose glycemic control would improve with use of these drugs with minimal risk of adverse events. In the counterpoint narrative below, Dr. Genuth suggests there is no longer a need for sulfonylureas to remain a first-line addition to metformin for those patients whose clinical characteristics are appropriate and whose health insurance and/or financial resources make an alternative drug affordable. —William T. Cefalu Editor in Chief, Diabetes Care In 2012 guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) (1), the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabe Continue reading >>

Management Of Blood Glucose With Noninsulin Therapies In Type 2 Diabetes

Management Of Blood Glucose With Noninsulin Therapies In Type 2 Diabetes

A comprehensive, collaborative approach is necessary for optimal treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Treatment guidelines focus on nutrition, exercise, and pharmacologic therapies to prevent and manage complications. Patients with prediabetes or new-onset diabetes should receive individualized medical nutrition therapy, preferably from a registered dietitian, as needed to achieve treatment goals. Patients should be treated initially with metformin because it is the only medication shown in randomized controlled trials to reduce mortality and complications. Additional medications such as sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 inhibitors, thiazolidinediones, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists should be added as needed in a patient-centered fashion. However, there is no evidence that any of these medications reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications, cardiovascular mortality, or all-cause mortality. There is insufficient evidence on which combination of hypoglycemic agents best improves health outcomes before escalating to insulin therapy. The American Diabetes Association recommends an A1C goal of less than 7% for many nonpregnant adults, with the option of a less stringent goal of less than 8% for patients with short life expectancy, cardiovascular risk factors, or long-standing diabetes. Randomized trials in middle-aged patients with cardiovascular risk factors have shown no mortality benefit and in some cases increased mortality with more stringent A1C targets. Clinical recommendation Evidence rating References Metformin should be used as first-line therapy to reduce microvascular complications, assist in weight management, reduce the risk of cardiovascular events, and reduce the risk of mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mell Continue reading >>

Fda Drug Safety Communication: Fda Revises Warnings Regarding Use Of The Diabetes Medicine Metformin In Certain Patients With Reduced Kidney Function

Fda Drug Safety Communication: Fda Revises Warnings Regarding Use Of The Diabetes Medicine Metformin In Certain Patients With Reduced Kidney Function

[ 4-8-2016 ] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring labeling changes regarding the recommendations for metformin-containing medicines for diabetes to expand metformin’s use in certain patients with reduced kidney function. The current labeling strongly recommends against use of metformin in some patients whose kidneys do not work normally. We were asked1,2 to review numerous medical studies regarding the safety of metformin use in patients with mild to moderate impairment in kidney function,3-14 and to change the measure of kidney function in the metformin drug labeling that is used to determine whether a patient can receive metformin. We have concluded our review, and are requiring changes to the labeling of all metformin-containing medicines to reflect this new information. Health care professionals should follow the latest recommendations when prescribing metformin-containing medicines to patients with impaired kidney function. Patients should talk to their health care professionals if they have any questions or concerns about taking metformin. Metformin-containing medicines are available by prescription only and are used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. When untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to serious problems, including blindness, nerve and kidney damage, and heart disease. Metformin-containing medicines are available as single-ingredient products and also in combination with other drugs used to treat diabetes (see FDA Approved metformin-containing Medicines). The current drug labeling strongly recommends against metformin use in some patients whose kidneys do not work normally because use of metformin in these patients can increase the risk of developing a serious and potentially dead Continue reading >>

Drug That Can Prevent The Onset Of Diabetes Is Rarely Used

Drug That Can Prevent The Onset Of Diabetes Is Rarely Used

Few doctors are prescribing a low-cost drug that has been proven effective in preventing the onset of diabetes, according to a UCLA study. The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Annals of Internal Medicine, found that only 3.7 percent of U.S. adults with pre-diabetes were prescribed metformin during a recent three-year period. Metformin and lifestyle changes both can prevent the onset of diabetes, but people often struggle to adopt healthier habits, according to Dr. Tannaz Moin, the study’s lead author and an assistant professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and at VA Greater Los Angeles. “Diabetes is prevalent, but pre-diabetes is even more prevalent and we have evidence-based therapies like metformin that are very safe and that work,” Moin said. “Metformin is rarely being used for diabetes prevention among people at risk for developing it. This is something that patients and doctors need to be talking about and thinking about.” It is estimated that about one-third of adults in the U.S. have pre-diabetes, which is marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association in 2008 added metformin to its annual “Standards for Medical Care in Diabetes” guidelines for use in diabetes prevention for those at very high risk who are under age 60, are severely obese, or have a history of gestational diabetes. Under the guidelines, metformin may also be considered for patients whose blood sugar is above normal but not yet in the diabetes range. The researchers examined data from 2010 to 2012 from UnitedHealthcare, the nation’s largest private insurer, for a national sample of 17,352 adults aged 19 to 58 with pre-diabetes. They also found: The prevalence of metformin Continue reading >>

Management Of Persistent Hyperglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Management Of Persistent Hyperglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The content on the UpToDate website is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions. The use of this website is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete. INTRODUCTION — Initial treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus includes education, with emphasis on lifestyle changes including diet, exercise, and weight reduction when appropriate. Monotherapy with metformin is indicated for most patients, and insulin may be indicated for initial treatment for some [1]. Although several studies have noted remissions of type 2 diabetes mellitus that may last several years, most patients require continuous treatment in order to maintain normal or near-normal glycemia. Bariatric surgical procedures in obese patients that result in major weight loss have been shown to lead to remission in a substantial fraction of patients. Regardless of the initial response to therapy, the natural history of most patients with type 2 diabetes is for blood glucose concentrations to rise gradually with time. Treatment for hyperglycemia that fails to respond to initial monotherapy and long-term pharmacologic therapy in type 2 diabetes is reviewed here. Options for initial therapy and other therapeutic issues in diabetes management, such as the frequency of monitoring and evaluation for microvascular and macrovascular complications, are discussed separately. (See "Initial management of blood glucose in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus" and "Overview of medical care in adults with diabetes mellitus". Continue reading >>

Influences On Prescribing Behavior In Diabetes

Influences On Prescribing Behavior In Diabetes

Influences on Prescribing Behavior in Diabetes A recent study,[ 1 ] conducted by three pharmacists and a nurse, explores why only 65% of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and only 25% of people with ongoing T2DM are prescribed metformin. Although metformin is recommended as a first-line treatment for T2DM, it is still underused by clinicians who manage patients with T2DM. Using two focus groups with a total of 14 participants, including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and pharmacists, the study explored situations in which clinicians were hesitant to prescribe or may have discontinued metformin use. These situations included renal insufficiency, heart failure, hepatic dysfunction, alcoholism, current or historical lactic acidosis, and manufacturer-listed contraindications. Despite a lack of scientific evidence supporting the precautions or contraindications to metformin use listed by the manufacturer, many clinicians were not comfortable prescribing metformin in the presence of a precautionary condition or contraindication. After a brief educational presentation about the evidence on the risks associated with metformin, the investigators reassessed the clinicians' level of comfort in prescribing metformin to patients with T2DM and such coexisting conditions as renal insufficiency, heart failure, and contraindications. They found that the participants were more likely to use metformin in these patients. The researchers concluded that the beliefs held by many clinicians about the risks associated with metformin use in T2DM are not consistent with the available evidence. They suggest that metformin use in patients with T2DM can be increased through clinician education to improve their level of comfort in using metformin in patient Continue reading >>

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

Have you been prescribed metformin for PCOS and are wondering what the side affects are? Metformin is often described as a ‘safe’ drug, but read on to find out why this might not be the case. When I was diagnosed with PCOS, the first thing I asked my GP was what I could take to ‘fix’ it. She gently explained that there was no pill or surgery that could cure my condition. However, there was a drug that could help with the elevated insulin levels caused by it. Metformin, she claimed, was a safe drug with no major side effects that would help with insulin resistance and weight loss. Sign me up. At first, I thought metformin was the wonder drug. I lost about 5kg in 4 months, more than I had ever been able to lose previously. I was ecstatic. I had a quick look online to see whether there were any side effects and initially found that diarrhea, loose stools, fatigue, and muscle soreness were commonly experienced. But I thought that it was small price to pay for finally being able to lose some weight. However, when I investigated further I found that that there are some much more sinister side effects of metformin that aren’t so widely publicised. These include: – Depleting our bodies of essential nutrients. – Increasing the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by up to 9 times. – Reducing energy levels by almost 50%. – Killing beneficial gut bacteria. This article is not intended to be a case against metformin for PCOS. There is no doubt that metformin helps to reduce weight, lowers blood glucose levels, and promotes ovulation. My concern is the lack of studies about the safety of long-term use of metformin for PCOS, especially in utero. Drugs can help with the associated symptoms of a disease, but they cannot fix the root cause of it. Metformin i Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication

Diabetes Medication

There are different types of medications available for diabetes mellitus with each having their own mechanism of action and side effects. The best drug should be chosen by a doctor assessing the condition of the patient – please note all these are prescription medicines and need to be taken properly, under medical-supervision and with correct dosage and at the right timings. You must, at all times, follow instructions from your doctor. Never self-medicate. Basically, anti-diabetic drugs can be categorized into two classes: A. Oral anti-diabetic drugs: This includes the following classes: Insulin secretagogues: sulphonylureas and non-sulphonylureas(Glinides/Meglitinide) Biguanides Thiazolidinediones a-glucosidase inhibitors Di-peptydyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors/gliptins Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors B. Injectable anti-diabetic drugs: Insulin preparations Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) agonists According to A consensus statement of the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, a tier system is used to prescribe medicines depending on how validated (tested) the medication is. The tier is divided into steps depending on the stage of diabetes and how the patient responds to the lifestyle changes and medicines. Tier 1: This includes the best established, most-effective and most cost effective therapeutic strategies to control blood sugar. This is also the most preferred strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes. The tier is divided into 3 steps. Step 1: These are prescribed at when someone is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Apart from a lifestyle change, a mild medication that is well tested, has low and less severe side-effects and is cheap is prescribed. Step 2: A second medication is added when step 1 Continue reading >>

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