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Do You Have To Take Januvia With Food?

Ask Joslin: How Should I Time My Meals And My Type 2 Diabetes Medications?

Ask Joslin: How Should I Time My Meals And My Type 2 Diabetes Medications?

Ask Joslin: How Should I Time My Meals and My Type 2 Diabetes Medications? People with type 2 diabetes may take up to three or four oral medications, insulin or an incretin to control their blood glucose levels. Oral medications usually work through different pathways in the body and attack high glucose levels from different angles. How and when you take them can mean getting that extra edge in your control as well as avoiding or reducing the unpleasant side effects of some of these medications. Lets start with the ubiquitously prescribed drug called metformin, brand name Glucophage. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose produced by your liver but it comes with a nasty, (although usually short-lived) side effect of stomach upset, gas and diarrhea. However, taking it with meals often blunts the intensity of the gastrointestinal symptoms (GI). Usually the full dose of metformin is given at breakfast and dinner. However, if you dont have any GI symptoms, and you have elevated glucose levels in the morning, your health care provider may suggest that take you medication later in the evening to reduce your morning numbers. Sulfonylureas are the old workhorse of diabetes oral medications. They stimulate the beta cells in the pancreas to make more insulin. There are two generations of sulfonylureas, but the older versions are rarely used anymore. Although there are many brand names for the second generation formulary including, Diabeta, Micronase, Glynase and Glucotrol, it is divided into two main drugs, glyburide and glipizide. For best effect take Diabeta, Micronase and Gynase right before you eat. Glucotrol should be ideally taken one-half hour before meals. Most often you will be taking sulfonylureas once or twice a day. Starlix and Prandin, which work in a sim Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin; Januvia

Sitagliptin; Januvia

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Can You Take Metformin And Januvia Together

Can You Take Metformin And Januvia Together

What type of drug is Metformin Metformin is a Generic name for a drug with antihyperglycemic properties that is used for treating non – insulin – dependent diabetes mellitus. This drug can improve glucose levels in blood by decreasing the production of glucose in liver, decreasing intestinal absorption of glucose and increasing insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Therapy with metformin may also decrease the risk of having a stroke, heart attack, or other diabetes-related complications. Metformin can induce weight loss and that’s why it is the drug of choice for obese patients with diabetes type two. When it is used alone, this drug doesn’t cause hypoglycemia as side effect; but, it may potentiate the hypoglycemic effects of sulfonylureas drugs and insulin if they are used together. Metformin is available in the form of tablet in following dosage forms: 500, 750, 850 and 1000 mg. It is usually taken during meals. Common Brand names on the market containing metformin as an active ingredient are: Glucophage, Glumetza, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, Metformin Sandoz, Diabex, Diaformin, Siofor, Metfogamma and Riomet. What is Januvia Januvia is a Brand name for a drug containing sitagliptin as an active ingredient. It is an oral diabetes drug that is used to control sugar levels in blood. Januvia works by regulating insulin levels that body produces after eating. This drug is used for the treatment of patints with type 2 diabetes. Januvia can be used in combination with other diabetes medicines, but is not used for treating type 1- diabetes. Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis should not use Januvia. Januvia is available in tablet and film-coated tablet form in following strenghts: 25, 50 and 100 mg. Common Brand names on the market containing sitagliptin as an active ingredie Continue reading >>

Yet Another Problem With Januvia

Yet Another Problem With Januvia

UPDATE (April 2, 2013): Before you take Byetta, Victoza, Onglyza, or Januvia please read about the new research that shows that they, and probably all incretin drugs, cause severely abnormal cell growth in the pancreas and precancerous tumors. You'll find that information HERE. Update (January, 2009) : A much more important problem with Januvia--that it promotes cancer by inhibiting a tumor suppressor gene researchers have called "the trigger for prostate cancer"--is discussed in this more recent blog post: More Research Shows Januvia and Glinides Inhibit Tumor Suppressor Gene DPP-4. Posted Dec 8, 2008. Original Post: If you have had or might get melanoma, ovarian cancer, lung cancer or prostate cancer, please read the above post before making your decision about whether Januvia is for you. Here is the original post that was posted 9/12/08: I have been hearing from people about a new, and, to me, very troubling problem with Januvia. The problem is this: now that doctors have decided that all people recently diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes should be put on Januvia, prescriptions for the combination drug Janumet, which is made up of both Januvia and Metformin, are becoming much more frequent as a first prescription for diabetes. Metformin is a very safe drug that has been used safely for decades. The most recent follow up to the UKPDS study, the 20 year follow-up, which was just presented at the annual EASD conference found that at 20 years after the start of the study, "Patients treated with metformin had a 21% reduction in risk of any diabetes endpoint (P=0.01), a 30% reduction in risk of diabetes-related death (P=0.01), a 33% reduction in risk of MI (P=0.005), and a 27% reduction in risk of all cause mortality (P=0.002)." Metformin is a very good drug for people with Ty Continue reading >>

Janumet Xr

Janumet Xr

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Januvia®

Januvia®

PDFLARGE FONT PDF Sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate Consumer Medicine Information What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about JANUVIA. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking JANUVIA against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may need to read it again. What JANUVIA is used for JANUVIA is used to lower blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus alone or in combination with certain other medicines (metformin, medicines such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, a sulfonylurea medicine such as glimepiride, gliclazide and glibenclamide, or insulin), when diet plus exercise or the other medicine(s) do not provide adequate blood sugar level control. Type 2 diabetes mellitus Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a condition in which your body does not make enough insulin and the insulin that your body produces does not work as well as it should. Your body can also make too much sugar. When this happens, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood. This can lead to serious medical problems. The main goal of treating diabetes is to lower your blood sugar to a normal level. Lowering and controlling blood sugar may help prevent or delay complications of diabetes, such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and amputation. High blood sugar can be lowered by diet and exercise and by certain medicines. How JANUVIA works JANUVIA is a member of a class of medicines you take by mouth called DPP-4 inhibitors (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) that lowers b Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Sitagliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Proper Use Drug information provided by: Micromedex Your doctor will tell you how much of this medicine to use and how often. Your dose may need to be changed several times in order to find out what works best for you. Do not use more medicine or use it more often than your doctor tells you to. This medicine should come with a Medication Guide. Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions. Metformin and sitagliptin combination should be taken with meals to help reduce any stomach upset. Take the extended-release tablets as directed in the evening. Swallow the extended-release tablet or immediate-release tablet whole. Do not crush, break, or chew it. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is the most important part of controlling your diabetes, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. While taking Janumet® XR, you may see tablets in your stools. If you see tablets in your stool several times, tell your doctor right away. Do not stop taking this medicine without checking first with your doctor. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine. For type 2 diabetes: For oral dosage form (extended-release tablets): Fo Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia is the brand name of the drug sitagliptin, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body doesn't make or use the hormone insulin normally, so it can't properly control your blood sugar levels. Januvia belongs to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. It works by increasing levels of substances in the body that help lower blood sugar. Januvia may be taken alone or with other diabetes medications. It's often prescribed as a combination medicine called Janumet (which contains the drugs sitagliptin and metformin). Taking Januvia, along with adopting a healthy lifestyle, can reduce your risk of developing serious or life-threatening complications from diabetes, which may include heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, kidney problems, or eye problems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Januvia in 2006. It's manufactured by Merck & Co. Januvia Warnings Januvia shouldn't be taken by people with type 1 diabetes (a disease in which the body doesn't produce any insulin) or diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous condition that can occur if high blood sugar is untreated). Before taking Januvia, tell your doctor if you have, or have ever had: Kidney disease Angioedema (swelling of the face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, or legs) Januvia may increase the risk of developing pancreatitis (swelling and inflammation of the pancreas). Be sure to tell your doctor if you've ever had any problems with your pancreas, or if you experience any of the following symptoms while taking Januvia: Severe pain in your upper stomach that spreads to your back Loss of appetite Fast heartbeat Severe nausea and vomiting Also, tell your doctor you're taking this medicine before having any type of surgery, including a dental Continue reading >>

Januvia (sitagliptin)

Januvia (sitagliptin)

What is it used for? Januvia can be used on its own to improve blood sugar control in people whose blood sugar is not controlled by changes to their diet and exercise alone and who can't take metformin. Januvia is also used for people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not sufficiently controlled by other antidiabetic medicines. It can be added to treatment with metformin, a sulphonylurea (for example gliclazide) or another type of antidiabetic medicine known as a thiazolidinedione (for example pioglitazone or rosiglitazone). It can also be used for people who are using insulin. How does it work? Januvia tablets contain the active ingredient sitagliptin, which is a type of medicine called a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. It is used to treat people with type 2 or non-insulin dependent diabetes (NIDDM). Sitagliptin works by increasing the amount of two incretin hormones found in the body, called glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). These hormones are normally produced naturally by the body in response to food intake. Their function is to help control blood sugar (glucose) levels. GLP-1 and GIP have four main actions that help to control blood glucose. Firstly, they stimulate the pancreas to produce insulin in response to increasing levels of glucose in the blood. (Insulin is the main hormone responsible for controlling sugar levels in the blood. It causes cells in the body to remove sugar from the blood.) GLP-1 also reduces the production of glucagon. (Glucagon is a hormone that normally increases glucose production by the liver.) GLP-1 and GIP also reduce the rate at which food passes from the stomach into the intestines, which slows down the absorption of glucose from the gut into the bloodstream. Finally, Continue reading >>

What Is Januvia

What Is Januvia

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Januvia And Metformin

What You Should Know About Januvia And Metformin

Januvia and Metformin are both oral diabetes drugs that are used to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Diabetes is a chronic condition where a person cannot make enough insulin or use it properly. Insulin is a natural hormone that is produced by the beta cells in the pancreas. This naturally occurring hormone works by transporting glucose into the body tissues where it is stored and used for energy. Glucose is a form of sugar which is one of the main sources of energy for the body. Without insulin, glucose cannot get into the cells. This leads to a build up of glucose in the bloodstream, which, if not treated, could lead to life threatening conditions. People with type 2 diabetes and a valid prescription can take Januvia and Metformin as a combination medicine together with exercise and diet to control blood sugar levels. However, you should not take these medications to treat type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the pancreas produces little or no insulin as a result of the immune system mistakenly attacking the beta cells. What is Januvia? Januvia is the brand name of sitagliptin and works by regulating the amount of insulin that is produced after taking a meal. You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to sitagliptin or in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. This medication is not supposed to be taken by anyone who is below the age of 18. You can take it with or without food. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral diabetes drug which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the brand name of glucophage. This medication can be taken in combination with other medications to control blood sugar levels. The medication works in the body by reducing the amount of glucose that is produced in the liver and decreasing glucose ab Continue reading >>

Januvia 50 Mg Film-coated Tablets

Januvia 50 Mg Film-coated Tablets

What is it and how is it used? Januvia is a member of a class of medicines you take by mouth called DPP-4 inhibitors (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) that lowers blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 2 diabetes is also called non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, or NIDDM. Januvia helps to improve the levels of insulin after a meal and decreases the amount of sugar made by the body. It is unlikely to cause low blood sugar because it does not work when your blood sugar is low. However, when Januvia is used in combination with a sulphonylurea medicine or with insulin, low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) can occur. Your doctor has prescribed Januvia to help lower your blood sugar, which is too high because of your type 2 diabetes. Januvia can be used alone or in combination with certain other medicines (insulin, metformin, sulphonylureas, or glitazones) that lower blood sugar, which you may already be taking for your diabetes together with a food and exercise plan. What is type 2 diabetes?Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which your body does not make enough insulin, and the insulin that your body produces does not work as well as it should. Your body can also make too much sugar. When this happens, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood. This can lead to serious medical problems like heart disease, kidney disease, blindness, and amputation. Table of Contents What do you have to consider before using it? How is it used? What are possible side effects? How should it be stored? Further information What do you have to consider before using it? Do not take Januvia if you are allergic (hypersensitive) to sitagliptin or any of the other ingredients of Januvia. Take special care with Januvia Cases of inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis) have Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin For Diabetes Januvia

Sitagliptin For Diabetes Januvia

Take sitagliptin tablets once a day. Remember to follow any advice you have been given about your diet. The most common side-effects are feeling sick (nausea), headache, and nose or throat infections. About sitagliptin Type of medicine An antidiabetic medicine Used for Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus Also called Januvia®; Janumet® (a combination tablet containing sitagliptin with metformin) Available as Tablets Insulin is a hormone which is made naturally in your body, in the pancreas. It helps to control the levels of sugar in your blood. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if it does not use the insulin it makes effectively, this results in the condition called sugar diabetes (diabetes mellitus). People with diabetes need treatment to control the amount of sugar (glucose) in their blood. This is because good control of blood glucose levels reduces the risk of complications later on. Some people can control the sugar in their blood by making changes to the food they eat but, for other people, medicines like sitagliptin are given alongside the changes in diet. Sitagliptin works in part by increasing the amount of insulin produced by your body. It also reduces the amount of a substance called glucagon being produced by your pancreas. Glucagon causes your liver to produce more sugar, so by reducing the amount of glucagon in your body, this also helps to reduce the levels of glucose in your blood. Before taking sitagliptin Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking sitagliptin it is important that your doctor knows: If you are pregnant, trying for a baby or breast-feeding. If you have any problems with the way your kidneys w Continue reading >>

Januvia (sitabliptin) Faq Information On Medicinenet.com

Januvia (sitabliptin) Faq Information On Medicinenet.com

Januvia may occasionally cause stomach discomfort and diarrhea . Tell your healthcare professional if you have any side effects that bothers you or that does not go away. Other side effects may occur when using Januvia. For more information, ask your healthcare professional. What Should I Tell My Healthcare Professional? Before you start taking Januvia, tell your healthcare professional if you: are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, because Januvia may not be right for you. It is not known if Januvia will harm your unborn baby. If you are pregnant, talk with your healthcare professional about the best way to control your blood sugar while you are pregnant. If you use Januvia during pregnancy , talk with your healthcare professional about how you can be on the Januvia registry. The toll-free telephone number for the pregnancy registry is: 1-800-986-8999. are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. Januvia may be passed in your milk to your baby. Talk with your healthcare professional about the best way to feed your baby if you are taking Januvia. During periods of stress on the body, such as fever, trauma, infection or surgery, your medication needs may change; contact your doctor right away. Can Other Medicines Or Food Affect Januvia? Tell your healthcare professional about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them with you to show your healthcare professional. Take Januvia exactly as your healthcare professional tells you to take it. If you have kidney problems, your doctor may prescribe lower doses of Januvia. Your healthcare professional may perform blood tests on you from time to time to measure how well your kidneys are working. Your healthca Continue reading >>

Januvia Really Works For Me!

Januvia Really Works For Me!

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I've been on maximum dose Metformin and Gliclazide for 6 years or so and at my GP appointment last week my HBA1C was 7.7 up from 6.7 last time and my own BS readings showed my BS going anything up to 15 two hours after a meal. I expected and even suggested that I go on to insulin as I was having to be extremely careful with food quantities and carbs to maintain even 7.7 HBA1C. My GP said I should I should not be trying to eat 'abnormally' (or be using a meter!) and after a some 'discussion' we agreed I would go onto Sitagliptin (Januvia). My GP warned me to be careful of hypos. I wasn't too worried as Gliclazide had not really worked for me and what I read about Sitagliptin is that it is self-controlling and doesn't itself add to hypo risk as it stops working as BS reaches normal levels. Anyway my BS measurements over the last week show a dramatic drop in my BS levels e.g. 6 to 7 two hours after a meal and also 6 after a gym workout after a small breakfast showing hypos not being an issue. For me Januvia is amazing (so far) with no apparent side effects. Perhaps it won't last and as my Type 1.5'ish diabetes, my diagnosis, doesn't exhibit the typical Type 2 insulin resistant symptoms it may not work for others. Anyone else any experience of Januvia? Because I am having a few odd high BG readings 2hr+ meals I have been hitting 17 ish also odd 9+ before meals Since Operation Dec my BG levels bit by bit are coming up both Met and Glit have been increased Always had good BG control odd blip with other Meds and Operations Diet is much the same always been lower ish Carb, Now smaller meals ,as less active in the wheels finding it harder to keep weight level Continue reading >>

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