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Do Statins Give You Diabetes?

Beware: Statin Drugs Can Actually Cause Diabetes

Beware: Statin Drugs Can Actually Cause Diabetes

Statin drugs increase your likelihood of suffering exercise-related injury, according to a recent study, and the harmful effect increases with age Several recent studies have also concluded that statins can increase your risk of developing diabetes. One meta-analysis found that one out of every 498 people who are on a high-dose statin regimen will develop diabetes as a result of the drug, but the risk may be as high as one in 255 Statins provoke diabetes by raising your blood sugar- and insulin levels, and by robbing your body of certain valuable nutrients, such as vitamin D and CoQ10, which are both needed to maintain ideal blood glucose levels Like thalidomide, statin drugs are a class X drug with regard to pregnancy, meaning they are contraindicated and should NOT be taken by pregnant women If you’re on a statin drug, you MUST take CoQ10 to alleviate some of the most dangerous side effects By Dr. Mercola Tens of millions of Americans are taking cholesterol-lowering drugs - mostly statins - and some "experts" claim that many millions more should be taking them, including children as young as eight. I couldn't disagree more. Statins are HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, that is, they act by blocking the enzyme in your liver that is responsible for making cholesterol (HMG-CoA reductase). The enzyme that these drugs block is actually responsible for far more than making cholesterol. It also makes CoQ10 which is vital for your mitochondrial health. The fact that statin drugs cause side effects is well established - there are now 900 studies proving their adverse effects, which run the gamut from muscle problems to diabetes, to birth defects and increased cancer risk. Now you can add exercise-related muscle damage to the ever growing list of harmful side effects. Statins Can Continue reading >>

Do Statins Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk?

Do Statins Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk?

I read that taking rosuvastatin (Crestor) may increase the risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Is this true for other statins? I'm a 55-year-old woman who is taking a low dose of Lipitor. My last fasting blood sugar showed that I'm at a pre-diabetes stage. You are correct. There is concern that at least two of the statin drugs, Crestor and simvastation (Zocor), are associated with an increased risk of the development of type 2 diabetes. A recent meta-analysis (pooled data from several studies) suggests there may be one additional case of diabetes for every 498 patients treated. However, statin therapy prevented one major cardiovascular event (stroke or heart attack) for every 155 patients treated. Every medicine that we take has potential benefit and potential risk. A reasoned and individual decision needs to be made between the health care provider and the patient regarding what is best. The risks of statins include a small incidence of liver and muscle problems which almost always resolve with stopping the medicine. Besides the recent link to type 2 diabetes, there is also some work that indicates statins occasionally cause reversible memory problems. On the plus side, there is no doubt that statins decrease cholesterol build up in the blood vessels that go the heart and the brain. They can even help "melt away" plaque build-up that is already there. When those vessels get clogged, heart attacks and strokes can occur. In a study recently published, people on statins when their cancer was diagnosed (as compared to those not on statins) had better survival and less metastatic disease. Statin use has also been associated with less Parkinson's disease and less Alzheimer's disease. The higher your risk for cardiovascular events, the more absolute benefit is derived from stati Continue reading >>

Statins

Statins

Tweet Diabetes and statins have a complex relationship and are the focus of intense patient and healthcare debate. Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs. Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that are frequently used as part of diabetes care due to the knowledge that people with diabetes face a greater likelihood of heart attack and stroke. When used alongside good blood glucose control and other medication, the case for statins argues that they cut cholesterol levels and lower the risk of a cardiovascular event. Type 2 diabetes in particular is commonly linked with higher levels of cholesterol. How can I lower my risk of cardiovascular problems without taking statins? There are other ways to lower your cholesterol and reduce your risk of stroke and heart attacks. These methods include stopping smoking, reducing your alcohol intake, taking regular physical activity and ensuring your diet is not over-reliant on processed foods. In some people, a change in lifestyle can make enough of a difference to cholesterol levels for you to not require cholesterol lowering treatment such as statins. If, however, your cholesterol levels remain above the target cholesterol levels and factors such as age and family history of heart disease and stroke show you to be at a high risk of heart disease, your doctor will likely advise statin treatment. What do statins do for people with diabetes? Statins affect the way the liver manufactures cholesterol, lowering levels of LDL cholesterol (the so called ‘bad’ cholesterol) and raising levels of HDL cholesterol (the so called ‘good’ cholesterol). The terms good and bad cholesterol are used because, whilst we do need both types of cholesterol, having too high levels LDl cholesterol is linked with higher risks of heart disease whereas h Continue reading >>

Statin Medicines: Frequently Asked Questions

Statin Medicines: Frequently Asked Questions

Statins are medicines that lower the level of LDL cholesterol in your blood (often described as bad cholesterol). Statins also help reduce the chance of heart attack or stroke for people who are at high risk of these problems. Find out more about statins. 8 min read Continue reading >>

Statins, Diabetes, Diet, And The “tony Roma” Effect

Statins, Diabetes, Diet, And The “tony Roma” Effect

Statins and Diabetes Recent research1 from the University of Queensland in Australia followed more than 8,000 women for 10 years. At the beginning of the study, none had diabetes. All were in their 70s or 80s. Over this 10-year period, nearly 50% of the women had filled a prescription for statins. The researchers found that they were hit with a 33% higher chance of developing type 2 diabetes compared to the women not taking statins. What’s more, the risk of getting diabetes rose to more than 50% among women taking higher doses of statins. More Statins, More Diabetes “That was most worrisome,” states lead author Dr. Mark Jones. “We found a ‘dose effect’ where the risk of diabetes increased as the dosage of statins increased.” Their study, wrote Dr. Jones and colleagues, suggests that “elderly women should not be exposed to higher doses of statins.” Also, careful monitoring of glucose levels is needed for “appropriate management of this potential adverse effect.” In fact, “consideration should be given to de-prescribing of statins.” “… the tip of the iceberg” This is hardly the first time that scientists have detected a link between statins and type 2 diabetes. In 2011, analyzing more than 170,000 people from 76 trials, researchers discovered a 9% increased odds of diabetes among statin users.2 In an accompanying editorial3 on statin-induced diabetes, authors Mark Goldstein and L. Mascitelli wrote, “Perhaps it’s the tip of the iceberg.” In another meta-analysis4 of more than 90,000 people, scientists from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom found an overall 9% increased risk of diabetes. And following nearly 162,000 women aged 50 to 79 years, a study5 led by researchers from Mayo Clinic found that statin use was associated Continue reading >>

Study Links Statins To Diabetes In Men

Study Links Statins To Diabetes In Men

Statins have been linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. A recent study conducted by researchers from Finland found that taking statins such as Zocor or Lipitor could cause a 46 percent elevated risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in men. The scientists theorize that this increased risk is due to “decreased insulin secretion and sensitivity.” However, the study, which was published in the BMJ, also noted that those taking statins are potentially already at higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, and that statins are important for preventing cardiovascular disease and other health conditions. Findings Understanding what factors contribute to a person’s risk of developing diabetes in imperative to creating better long-term prevention and care plans. For diabetics, a minor foot sore can quickly lead to amputation if it is not dressed and treated effectively. According to the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, more than 86 million Americans have prediabetes, a high blood sugar level that when not addressed weight loss and regular physical activity, can result in Type 2 diabetes within five years. With that in mind, the Finnish researchers set out to investigate the mechanisms behind statin-induced diabetes and risk in men and if statins increased the risk of controlling blood sugar. The team began the study with 8,749 non-diabetic men, all age 45-73, and conducted a six year follow-up. New diabetes was diagnosed in 625 of the participants and then the team adjusted for a wide range of factors related to the causation of Type 2 diabetes. Using this data, researchers found that participants taking statins were 46 percent more likely to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes than those not taking statins. Statin-induced diabetes often occurs in individ Continue reading >>

Do Statins Cause Diabetes?

Do Statins Cause Diabetes?

A New Study Has Statin Use Increasing Adult Onset Diabetes by 46%. Earlier studies had a 10% to 20% increase. Why the difference? And why are statins still prescribed Numerous studies have shown no benefit from statin use. The most recent one, reported in MedScape, shows a rather horrifying increase in adult onset diabetes: “Statin therapy appears to increase the risk for type 2 diabetes by 46%, even after adjustment for confounding factors.” The study looked at a six-year time frame and followed almost 9,000 people that had started statins. The study seems quite well done. The result is markedly higher than previously reported incidence of diabetes among statin users. Commenting on this, one statin advocate believed the benefits of statin therapy would outweigh the diabetes risk. Hard to fathom. The paper is available here. One result, not entirely unexpected, is that the affect is dose dependent. The stronger statins caused more adult onset diabetes. So why do statins greatly increase the risk of adult onset diabetes? This appears to be very direct. Statins make insulin resistance worse. It is insulin resistance, almost always caused by a diet chronically high in sugar and starch, that causes adult onset diabetes. The affect of statins on insulin resistance was also reported in MedScape, and can be viewed here. It appears that insulin levels rose about 40% after 12 weeks on the statins. That this would then trigger adult onset diabetes comes as no surprise. Statin use also appears to increase some types of inflammation, which could cause any number of problems, cancer included. So why the discrepancy with previously reported results? There are a couple of reasons this may be. Many of the results came from clinical trials. Clinical trials engage in a dubious practi Continue reading >>

Study: Statins Do More Harm Than Good And Increase Memory Loss, Diabetes And Cancer Risk

Study: Statins Do More Harm Than Good And Increase Memory Loss, Diabetes And Cancer Risk

Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, with approximately 610,000 Americans dying from it every year. It has become a popular theory that high cholesterol levels can have an adverse impact on your heart health, so, to combat this, many people turn towards cholesterol-lowering drugs to lower their risk of heart disease. However, it turns out that one of America’s most popular cholesterol-lowering drugs, statins, are not only ineffective at reducing the risk of heart attack in certain populations but also cause a variety of unpleasant side effects and has even been linked to cancer. Are Statins bad? Cholesterol And The Body Cholesterol is classified as a sterol, which is a combination of a steroid and alcohol and not technically a fat. There is a lot of confusion when people talk about “cholesterol levels, ” and it’s important to understand that you don’t actually have cholesterol in your blood. For cholesterol to be transported around the body in our blood and blood vessels, it has to be carried around by special little proteins called lipoproteins which are made in the liver. Different types of lipoproteins are classified according to their density. You may be familiar with the two most important lipoproteins in regards to cardiovascular disease low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Kris Kresser uses a great analogy of cars on a highway to get an understanding of how lipoproteins impact heart disease. If you imagine your bloodstream is like a highway, the lipoproteins are taxis that carry the cholesterol, triglycerides, fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants around your body to your cells and tissues. So you can think of the cholesterol and fats as passengers in the taxi. Quick Recap: Blood = highwa Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes (t2dm) Cholesterol And Statins.

Type 2 Diabetes (t2dm) Cholesterol And Statins.

As part of the Open Data Campaign (1) An editorial ‘Statins for people at low risk’ stated, ‘In particular, how can it be right to recommend mass treatment of healthy people without independent review of the patient level data, especially the data on adverse effects?’ (2) The use of statins to manage cholesterol levels is not a straightforward proposition. The diet heart hypothesis needs urgent clarification. The use of statins in a low risk population can actually risk taking those people into a high risk one. A wealth of evidence has established that cholesterol lowering statin drugs, widely used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, do increase the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes. (T2DM) (3) Statins have been associated with a 46% rise in type 2 diabetes risk. (4) As statins have been associated with hyperglycaemia it potentially opens another avenue for the prescribing of new and controversial diabetes drugs, which have limited or no safety profile. Especially as diabetes management is glucocentric (Defined as: Focus on glucose as the cause of a condition - to the exclusion of other factors). Perhaps ‘cholesterolcentric’ falls under the same misconception? Concerns have also been highlighted that statins block the endogenous production of co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10) (5) (6) (7) (8) Studies conducted on CoQ10 levels provide a gathering body of evidence highlighting the importance of CoQ10 in diabetes management. (9)(10)(11) Further studies in the role of co-enzyme Q10 are obviously needed. Cholesterol has been portrayed as a villain in cardiovascular health. However it holds an essential role in homeostasis. Vitamin D is Synthesized from Cholesterol and found in Cholesterol-Rich Foods. Vitamin D is manufactured in the body from cholesterol, specifical Continue reading >>

Statin Use And Diabetes Risk

Statin Use And Diabetes Risk

1. LINH HUYNH MCPHS UNIVERSITY, PHARMD CANDIDATE FEB 11, 2016 2.  Understand The Pathological Pathway Of Statin-induced Diabetogenic Effects Evaluate Study Reports On Incidence Of Diabetes With Statin Use Discuss The Implications of Statin Use with The Risk of Developing Diabetes In Clinical Practice OBJECTIVES 3.  EFFECTS OF STATIN ON GLUCOSE HOMEOSTASIS Sattar N, Taskinen. Statins are diabetogenic – Myth or reality? Atherosclerosis Supplements. 2012;13:1-10. 4.  Type 2 Diabetes Insulin Secretion Insulin Sensitivity Statins L-type Ca channel blockage ATP synthesis Alteration of LDL concentration Adiponectin GLUT-4 5.   17,802 healthy men and women with LDL < 130mg/dL and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels ≥ 2md/L were assigned to rosuvastatin 20mg QD or placebo (1:1) and were followed for occurrence of cardiovascular events  An unexpected finding through physician reports regarding newly diagnosed cases of diabetes during the follow-up period:  Rosuvastatin-treated group: 270 in 8901 individuals (3%)  Placebo-treated group: 214 in 8901 individuals (2.4%)  P value: 0.01 JUPITER TRIAL Ridker P, Danielson E, Fonseca F. Rosuvastatin to Prevent Vascular Events in Men and Women with Elevated C-Reactive Protein. Journal of Vascular Surgery 2009;49(2):534. 6.   A clinical review (meta-analysis) of experimental studies has shown relevant findings regarding the association of statin use with diabetes incidence  Statins, as a class, increase the risk of incident diabetes  However, individual statin data showed that statins have a variable effect. FURTHER ANALYSES Park ZH, Juska A, Dyakov D, Patel RV. Statin-Associated Incident Diabetes: A Literature Review. The Consultant Pharmacist 2014;29(5):317–334. 7 Continue reading >>

Statins: More Likely To Give You Diabetes Than Prevent A Heart Attack

Statins: More Likely To Give You Diabetes Than Prevent A Heart Attack

That statin drugs come with diabetes as a side effect has been known for the last ten years and, in America (but not in the UK), statins have had to carry a warning to this effect since 2012. Now, researchers at McMaster University in Canada have uncovered a novel mechanism in the body by which statins can disrupt your blood sugar control. In an earlier blog post, I described how statin drugs block the production of cholesterol in the liver but at the same time block the production of a related substance called dolichol, which plays an important role in sugar metabolism and insulin sensitivity. The Canadian study, carried out on mice, has found that statins also provoke a very specific immune response that prevents insulin from doing its job properly1. If the same applies to humans, taking statins is very likely to cause a type of chronic inflammation that leads to insulin resistance and may also damage the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Chronic inflammation is a major factor in diabetes and in many other chronic disease conditions. This latest research is significant because, although the link between statins and diabetes has been found by many studies, these have only shown that there is an association and have not demonstrated cause and effect. Now there is hard evidence that statins do cause diabetes and that they are likely to do so through at least two different mechanisms in the body. Earlier research has linked statins with both increased blood sugar levels and an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes. In one placebo-controlled trial, which was intended to show the cardiovascular benefits of a statin drug, diabetes was diagnosed in 27 per cent more patients taking the statin (rosuvastatin) than in those given placebo2. Another study examined the he Continue reading >>

Statin Induced Diabetes

Statin Induced Diabetes

By Duane Graveline, M.D., M.P.H. New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes: www.diabetologia-journal.org) shows that use of statins is associated with a 46% increase in the risk of developing diabetes, even after adjustment for confounding factors. Previous studies done on selected populations have revealed an increased risk of developing diabetes but nowhere near the risk level associated with this study on general populations, which, incidentally is far closer to the truth. Very often in previous studies the diagnosis of diabetes has been based on self-reported diabetes or fasting glucose measurement, leading to a gross underestimation of the actual numbers of incident diabetes cases. In this new study, the authors investigated the effects of statin treatment on the risk of type 2 diabetes and deterioration of blood sugar control in 8,749 non-diabetic men in a 6-year follow-up of the population-based Metabolic Syndrome in Men (METSIM) study, based in Kuopio, Finland. The authors also investigated the mechanisms of statin-induced diabetes by evaluating changes in insulin resistance and insulin secretion. The participants, aged 45-73 years, were followed up for 5.9 years. New diabetes was diagnosed in 625 men with either an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), an HbA1c level of 6.5% or higher, or anti-diabetic medication started during the follow-up. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were evaluated. The researchers found that after the results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, family history of diabetes, and beta-blocker and diuretic treatment, patients treated with statins were 46% more likely to develop diabetes than those not tre Continue reading >>

Study Uncovers Why Statins Increase Diabetes Risk And Offers Solution

Study Uncovers Why Statins Increase Diabetes Risk And Offers Solution

Statins are drugs that lower cholesterol in the body by interfering with the production of cholesterol in the liver. Though they lower bad cholesterol and raise good cholesterol, one side effect is that they increase risk of diabetes. Now, researchers have discovered why and offer a way to suppress this side effect. One of the world's most widely used drugs, statins have been hailed by the medical community for their ability to prevent heart disease. Still, the researchers, who have published their findings in the journal Diabetes, were confused as to why diabetes was linked to statin use. "Recently, an increased risk of diabetes has been added to the warning label for statin use," says lead author Jonathan Schertzer, assistant professor of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, and Canadian Diabetes Association Scholar. "This was perplexing to us," he continues, "because if you are improving your metabolic profile with statins you should actually be decreasing the incidence of diabetes with these drugs, yet, the opposite happened." According to the team, around 13 million people could be prescribed a statin drug at some point in their lives. In January of this year, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a Consumer Update outlining some of the risks associated with taking statins, which included an increased risk of raised blood sugar levels and the development of type 2 diabetes. At that time, Dr. Amy G. Egan, deputy director for safety in the FDA's Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology Products, said: Clearly we think that the heart benefits of statins outweighs this small increased risk. But what this means for patients taking statins and the health care professionals prescribing them is that blood-sugar levels may need to be assessed after instituting st Continue reading >>

The Truth About Statins And Diabetes

The Truth About Statins And Diabetes

As you know, statins rank as one of my most despised drug classes of all time. Statins have traditionally been prescribed to patients with high cholesterol, in an effort to lower it. And yes, for whatever it’s worth, statins are great at lowering cholesterol. But usually not without paying a price. Statins have been linked to weight gain, liver damage, memory loss, muscle wasting, chronic pain, insomnia, cataracts, and brain fog. Just to name a few. But one of the most dangerous associations is between statins and diabetes. You see, there have been conflicting reports on statins’ role in this disease. Some research suggests that statins cause diabetes, while another study claims they lower the risk of developing it. So when I came across this headline the other day: “The Statin Diabetes Conundrum: Short-term Gain, Long-term Risk or Inconvenient Truth?” I had to take a closer look. I was actually impressed by what I read because this was an independent review that looked at several studies on statins. They parsed out the positives and negatives to try to determine what, if any, meaningful use these drugs may have. In an effort to make sense out of all this confusion, here are a few simple questions and answers that cut through all the mumbo jumbo: Do statins cause diabetes? You know there must be some truth to the fact that statins are risky when the FDA finally steps in. In fact, the FDA just updated the warning on its website to say: “People being treated with statins may have an increased risk of raised blood sugar levels and the development of Type 2 diabetes.” After carefully examining the evidence, the consensus is yes, there is a modest increased risk of diabetes from statin drugs. If you already have diabetes, will taking statins make it worse? Probab Continue reading >>

Cataracts Linked With Type 2 Diabetes And Statin Use: Study

Cataracts Linked With Type 2 Diabetes And Statin Use: Study

A research study published in Optometry and Vision Science suggests that age-related cataracts are associated with type 2 diabetes and statin use. The study was conducted by researchers of University of Waterloo, Canada, led by Carolyn M. Machan, O.D. As part of the study, the researchers collected data from nearly 6,400 patients of the optometry clinic at the University of Waterloo in 2007-08. Among them, 452 patients had type 2 diabetes, of which 56 percent were taking statins. Among the remaining 9,548 non-diabetic patients, only 16 percent were taking statins. The researchers noted that there was an increased rate of age-related cataracts in both the diabetic patients and the participants taking statins. In fact, after taking other factors into consideration, the team concluded that statin use was associated with a 57 percent increase in cataract risk. The cataract risk for diabetic patients was significantly higher – 82 percent. However, despite the increased rate of statin use among diabetic patients, the two risk factors were seemingly independent of each other. On average, the age difference for appearance of cataracts between non-diabetic patients who did not take statins and diabetic patients who took statins was 5.6 years, with the latter group developing cataracts earlier. Daily statin use (to lower cholesterol) may raise your risk of developing cataracts In another related study, published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, researchers looked at more than 207,000 adults with cataracts and more than 1.1 million without them. At the end of the study, the researchers concluded that while statins such as Lipitor, Zocor, and Crestor protect many people from heart attack and stroke, they may increase the risk of developing vision problems. However, the lead Continue reading >>

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