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Do Statins Cause High Blood Sugar?

Statin Side Effects: Weigh The Benefits And Risks

Statin Side Effects: Weigh The Benefits And Risks

Statin side effects can be uncomfortable, making it seem like the risks outweigh the benefits of these powerful cholesterol-lowering medications. Doctors often prescribe statins for people with high cholesterol to lower their total cholesterol and reduce their risk of a heart attack or stroke. While statins are highly effective, they have been linked to muscle pain, digestive problems and mental fuzziness in some people and may rarely cause liver damage. Statins include atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Altoprev), pitavastatin (Livalo), pravastatin (Pravachol), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor). Having too much cholesterol in your blood increases your risk of heart attacks and strokes. Statins block a substance your liver needs to make cholesterol. This causes your liver to remove cholesterol from your blood. If you think you're experiencing side effects from statins, don't just stop taking the pills. Talk to your doctor to see if a change of dosage or even a different type of medication might be helpful. What are statin side effects? Muscle pain and damage One of the most common complaints of people taking statins is muscle pain. You may feel this pain as a soreness, tiredness or weakness in your muscles. The pain can be a mild discomfort, or it can be severe enough to make your daily activities difficult. Oddly enough, most randomized controlled studies of statins indicate that people taking statins develop muscle pain at the same rate as people taking placebo. But up to 29 percent of the people who start taking statins report muscle pain and many discontinue statins because of it. Many of these people do well when they are switched to a different variety of statin. Very rarely, statins can cause life-threatening muscle damage call Continue reading >>

Statins May Raise The Chances Of Diabetes: Cholesterol-lowering Pills Increase The Likelihood Of The Condition - But Doctors Say The Benefits 'outweigh The Risks'

Statins May Raise The Chances Of Diabetes: Cholesterol-lowering Pills Increase The Likelihood Of The Condition - But Doctors Say The Benefits 'outweigh The Risks'

Statins, which lower the 'bad' form of cholesterol, could increase the risk of diabetes, a study suggests. Scientists found that people with naturally lower levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were less likely to develop heart disease. But they were slightly more vulnerable to type 2 diabetes. As statins reduce LDL levels they will have the same effect, they believe. They also found boosting levels of 'good' cholesterol may protect against type 2 diabetes - meaning one day this could prevent or treat the condition. Scroll down for video Lead researcher Dr Michael Holmes, from Oxford University, said: 'What we've shown in this study is that the role played by blood lipid levels in disease is a complex one. 'While the effect of taking LDL cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins may slightly increase a person's risk of developing diabetes this effect is greatly outweighed by their benefits in the form of preventing people from suffering from a life-altering heart attack or stroke.' Scientists do not know exactly why having lower levels of LDL cholesterol increases the risk of type 2 diabetes. One theory is that the drugs raise a person's resistance to insulin, the hormone that takes sugar out of the blood. Spending on diabetes prescriptions has nearly doubled in a decade, a report has revealed. The NHS spent £956.7 million on insulin, antidiabetic drugs and diagnostic and monitoring services - such as machines to test blood sugar - in 2015/16. This is an 86 per cent increase since 2005/06, when £513.9 million was spent on the same treatments for the disease, official figures show. In fact, diabetes drugs now make up more than 10 per cent of the total cost of prescriptions in primary care. Since 2007/08, they have accounted for the highest cost of any g Continue reading >>

Statins Raise Diabetes Risk: Experts Sound New Alarm Over Cholesterol Pill

Statins Raise Diabetes Risk: Experts Sound New Alarm Over Cholesterol Pill

Those on high doses of the cholesterol-busting pills are more prone to suffer dangerous spikes in blood sugar levels. Scientists say an unwanted by-product of the drug is a link to the chronic condition. Studies show those prescribed statins are less likely to develop heart disease but the downside is it appears to make them more vulnerable to Type 2 diabetes. Researchers found over-75s are a third more likely to be struck down if they are taking statins. But the risk increased to 50 per cent for those on higher doses of the tablets. Dr Mark Jones, who led the research, said: “We found almost 50 per cent of women in their late-70s and 80s in the study took statins and five per cent were diagnosed with new onset diabetes. What is most concerning was we found a ‘dose effect’ where the risk of diabetes increased as the dosage of statins increased. “Over the 10 years of the study most of the women progressed to higher doses of statins. GPs and their elderly female patients should be aware of the risks.” The study will reignite debate over the safety of a drug taken by millions of Britons each day. A large-scale British review last year showed statins were the safest and most effective way of preventing heart attack and stroke but they still remain highly controversial. Professor Alan Sinclair, director of the Foundation for Diabetes Research in Older People, said: “Statin use and increased diabetes risk is not new and clinicians must continue to minimise risk due to the adverse effects of these drugs by careful prescribing but at the same time recognise clear cardiovascular benefits from their use. We found almost 50 per cent of women in their late-70s and 80s in the study took statins “In older people, who are already at increased diabetes risk from other cau Continue reading >>

Does Statin Increase Blood Sugar Level?

Does Statin Increase Blood Sugar Level?

Lipitor (sold generically as atorvastatin) belongs to a popular class of cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins, which make up a major portion of all prescriptions filled in the United States each year. Lipitor plays a role in that popularity: it was the top-selling prescription drug in 2011, generating $7.7 billion dollars in U.S. sales for manufacturer Pfizer that year. It remains one of the most widely prescribed drugs on the market. Like all statins, Lipitor helps prevent heart disease and stroke by lowering the level of cholesterol in the blood. Recently, medical researchers uncovered new risks associated with the drug, including an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes. Although clinical research on Lipitor and other statins indicates these drugs can increase a patient’s risk for developing diabetes, they shed little light on how the increased risk occurs. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body fails to properly use or produce insulin, a crucial hormone the body uses to convert food into energy. Bodies break down the food we eat into sugar, or glucose, which travels throughout the bloodstream. But if insulin isn’t working the way it should, glucose can’t enter the body’s cells to provide them with the energy they need. This causes a spike in blood sugar levels – a problem that can result in serious health complications. Researchers suspect that taking statins, including Lipitor, impairs the function of special cells in the pancreas that store and release insulin. There is also evidence that statins, like Atorvastatin, can decrease the body’s sensitivity to insulin. The study, which included 153,840 non-diabetic women between the ages of 50 and 79, considered several other factors also known to increase the risk for diabetes, including advanced age, obesi Continue reading >>

Could Statins Raise Diabetes Risk?

Could Statins Raise Diabetes Risk?

HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Certain statins -- the widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs -- may increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. The risk was greatest for patients taking atorvastatin (brand name Lipitor), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor), the study said. Focusing on almost 500,000 Ontario residents, researchers in Canada found that the overall odds of developing diabetes were low in patients prescribed statins. Still, people taking Lipitor had a 22 percent higher risk of new-onset diabetes, Crestor users had an 18 percent increased risk and people taking Zocor had a 10 percent increased risk, relative to those taking pravastatin (Pravachol), which appears to have a favorable effect on diabetes. Physicians should weigh the risks and benefits when prescribing these medications, the researchers said in the study, which was published online May 23 in the journal BMJ. This does not, however, mean that patients should stop taking their statins, the experts said. The study also showed only an association between statin use and higher risk of diabetes; it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. "While this is an important study evaluating the relationship between statins and the risk of diabetes, the study has several flaws that make it difficult to generalize the results," said Dr. Dara Cohen, a professor of medicine in the department of endocrinology, diabetes and bone disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. "There was no data regarding weight, ethnicity and family history -- all important risk factors for the development of diabetes." Cohen added that there was no information on the patients' cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and that higher-risk pa Continue reading >>

Do Statins Cause Diabetes And Heart Disease?

Do Statins Cause Diabetes And Heart Disease?

I recall reading a scientific paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association a number of years ago by Dr. David Jenkins from the University of Toronto. He showed that using a combination of soy, fiber, almonds, and plant sterols (cholesterol-lowering fats) could lower cholesterol levels as much as statin medications.(i) Diet can lower cholesterol as much as statins—a surprise to many but common in my practice. Using a comprehensive approach of diet and lifestyle change, I routinely see effects that are more powerful than any medication. That was not why the article struck me. It was a finding buried in the text of the paper. What I found fascinating was that the patients who lowered their cholesterol with statins had higher levels of insulin, while those who lowered their cholesterol through diet had lower insulin levels. Why is that important? Because elevated insulin levels are the first step on the road to diabetes—they make you gain weight around the middle, cause high blood pressure, increase inflammation, and promote stickiness of the blood. Each of these conditions, in turn, contributes to heart attacks and heart disease. On reading this, the question that lingered in my mind was: Did statins contribute to the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes which are among the most significant risk factors for heart disease? In other words, did lowering cholesterol with statins—a treatment purported to reduce the risk of heart disease—actually increase the risk of heart disease by some other mechanism? In treating thousands of patients with pre-diabetes, diabetes, high cholesterol, and heart disease, I have noticed one thing: Lowering insulin through diet and lifestyle corrects almost all of the risk factors for heart disease. It lowers blood pressure, Continue reading >>

For Diabetics, The Correct Statin Matters

For Diabetics, The Correct Statin Matters

Statins can increase serum glucose and increase the risk of developing diabetes in certain patients, but that doesn’t mean your diabetic patients shouldn’t take them. In fact, the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/ American Heart Association (AHA) cholesterol treatment guidelines say that the “occurrence of a major ASCVD event represents a much greater harm to health status than does an increase in blood glucose.” The Food and Drug Administration concurs, noting in its safety label change on statins that the cardiovascular benefits of the widely used drugs typically outweighs the disadvantages of modestly higher blood sugar levels or incident diabetes. Still, when you’re treating a patient with diabetes, you would rather have all the medications working to improve blood glucose levels. Careful selection of the right statin can keep from reversing some hard-earned progress in reducing HbA1c levels, according to a study published online ahead of print in the December issue of Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports. The Data Researchers examined the connection between statins, glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance. They found that both dose and type of statin affected the risk of newly diagnosed diabetes and overall elevation of blood glucose levels, based on a review of 12 previous studies. Atorvastatin (10 or 20 mg) had a greater effect on blood sugar than the same doses of pravastatin or simvastatin in one study, while another showed that the higher-intensity statins such as atorvastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin increased the risk of newly diagnosed diabetes compared to treatment with fluvastatin or lovastatin over a 14-year period. Higher dose atorvastatin and simvastatin (80 mg) increased the risk of incident diabetes 12% compared to lower doses of Continue reading >>

Statin Use And Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus

Statin Use And Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: STATINS IN DIABETES Statins are used for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Other benefits due to statins are not mediated by their lipid lowering properties[8] but due to its pleiotropic effects. In conditions like heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, vascular disease and hypertension the non-lipid lowering pleotropic benefits of statins have been observed[9]. These pleiotropic effects mediated by statins can be due to inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis which in turn inhibits intracellular signaling molecules Rho, Rac and Cdc42. The predominant mechanism that has been postulated is inhibition of Rho and its activation to Rho kinase[10]. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and insulin deficiency. The insulin resistance contributes to the abnormal lipid profile associated with type 2 diabetes[11]. Dyslipidemia contributes to increased cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes[12]. A linear relationship exists between cholesterol levels and cardiovascular diseases in diabetics even if we ignore the baseline LDL[13]. By predominantly lowering LDL-Cholesterol and due to minor effects on other lipoproteins, statins appear to be beneficial[12]. In Heart Protection Study which was done in diabetics, the decrease in cardiovascular events like first major coronary event, stroke were to the tune of 22% as compared to placebo[14]. It was recommended by American Diabetes Association that statin therapy should be initiated in individuals with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors with target LDL cholesterol of 100 mg/dL[15]. Investigators are also of the opinion that statin therapy should depend not on the LDL levels but the cardiovascular complications accompanying diabetes[16]. Other studies wh Continue reading >>

Cholesterol-lowering Drugs May Be Linked To Diabetes

Cholesterol-lowering Drugs May Be Linked To Diabetes

You may have concerns about taking a cholesterol-lowering statin drug, such as atorvastatin (Lipitor and generic), rosuvastatin (Crestor), and simvastatin (Zocor and generic), after a recent study linked those drugs to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. But Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs experts say the heart-protective benefit of statins usually outweighs the risk of diabetes, so don’t skip a statin if you need one to lower your cholesterol. Diabetes isn’t a new side effect of statins. The Food and Drug Administration added it to the label of all statins in 2012 based on a review of studies that found a slightly elevated risk. For example, one study that reviewed 13 randomized, controlled clinical trials of statins found that 4.9 percent of people who took one of the drugs for 4 years developed diabetes compared with 4.5 percent of those who didn’t take a statin. Lower Cholesterol vs. Higher Blood Glucose The new study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, raises questions about whether the diabetes risk is higher than previously thought. Researchers looked at medical data of nearly 7,000 men and women with an average age of 53. About 31 percent of those who took a statin for an average of 5.5 years developed diabetes compared with 19 percent of those who didn’t. But since the study was not a randomized, controlled study—the gold standard for determining whether a drug causes a particular side effect—it’s not known for sure that the increase in diabetes was entirely due to statins. The study participants might have had other factors that contributed to the development of diabetes. "All we can say," says Ishak Mansi, M.D., an internist at the Veteran's Hospital in North Texas and co-author of the study, "[is] that in the healthy popul Continue reading >>

The Link Between Statin Drugs, Diabetes And Cholesterol

The Link Between Statin Drugs, Diabetes And Cholesterol

Focus on Health… Is it really type II diabetes or drug-induced hyperglycemia? Several studies prove statin drugs can raise blood sugar levels; Statin drugs send messages to your liver to STOP making any more cholesterol—so… the liver sends the sugar back OUT to your bloodstream and now you get diagnosed with type II diabetes. Key Points… Statins deplete vitamin D and reduce the body’s ability to create active vitamin D (calcitriol)— a substance that is eventually converted to its active hormone form; Statins reduce cholesterol — you must have cholesterol to make vitamin D; Statins also suppress your natural coenzyme Q10 — responsible for making energy in every cell in your body, primarily produced in your liver; 99 out of 100 people do NOT need a statin drug; Part of seeing past the drug propaganda is to understand that cholesterol is NOT the cause of heart disease. If your physician is urging you to check your total cholesterol, then you should know that this test will tell you virtually nothing about your risk of heart disease, unless it is 330 or higher. Scientifically Speaking… We all know how important antioxidants are to our health and longevity. We also know that diagnosed cases of type II diabetes are currently in epidemic proportions in the U.S. What do those facts have to do with this investigative report? Everything. Coenzyme Q10, for example, is not only a powerful antioxidant it also plays a major role in maintaining healthy blood glucose levels; when you’re prescribed a statin drug, it depletes your levels of CoQ10, hence losing the benefit of blood glucose regulation. Additionally, a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition determined that raising vitamin D serum levels from 25 to 75 nmol/L can improve insulin sens Continue reading >>

Statins And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Statins And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Statins are a type of drug prescribed to patients with high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. They work by blocking a substance needed to make LDL cholesterol, or “bad” cholesterol, in your liver. As it travels through the blood, LDL cholesterol deposits fatty particles on the arterial walls in the heart and brain. Over time, buildup can cause a blockage that can lead to heart attack or stroke. Statins help lower LDL cholesterol. This can lower your risk of stroke and heart attack. Statins also help to: reduce inflammation improve the health of the lining of blood vessels reduce the risk of blood clots Statins have been used for more than 25 years. In February 2012, though, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advised health providers and consumers that the use of statins may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Statins are usually safe and provide many benefits. As with many drugs, you and your doctor must weigh the pros and cons of taking a statin drug. The FDA still believes in the benefits of statins. The 2012 announcement isn’t meant to urge all people to stop taking statins. Rather, it advises doctors to monitor the blood sugar levels of their patients who take these drugs. The American Diabetes Association states that the benefits of taking a statin outweigh the risk of acquiring diabetes. The American Heart Association suggests that there isn’t enough data to support stopping your statin use if you have type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a disorder that affects how much insulin your body releases, how your body uses it, or both. Insulin is a hormone your pancreas makes and releases after your body breaks food down into glucose. The hormone helps transport the glucose from your blood into your body’s cells, where it is us Continue reading >>

If You’re Like Bill And Have High Cholesterol And Type 2 Diabetes (t2d),

If You’re Like Bill And Have High Cholesterol And Type 2 Diabetes (t2d),

What is the most important information I should know and talk to my doctor about? Call your healthcare provider or get help right away if you experience any symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as rash, itching, or hives. Muscle problems may be an early sign of rare, serious conditions. Tell your doctor right away if you have any unexplained muscle pain, weakness, or tenderness, particularly if accompanied by malaise or fever, or if these muscle signs or symptoms persist after discontinuing LIVALO. Serious liver problems have been reported rarely in patients taking statins, including LIVALO. Your doctor should do liver tests before you start, and if you have symptoms of liver problems while you are taking LIVALO. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you feel more tired than usual, have a loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark-colored urine, or yellowing of the skin or eyes. Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications you take including nonprescription medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements. Increases in blood sugar levels have been reported with statins, including LIVALO. Tell your doctor about your alcohol use. What are the most common side effects of LIVALO? The most common side effects of LIVALO in clinical studies were: Back pain Constipation Diarrhea Muscle pain Pain in the legs or arms This is not a complete list of side effects. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information. How should I store and take LIVALO? Store LIVALO tablets at room temperature, in a dry place, and out of the reach of children. LIVALO can be taken at any time of day, with or without food. Swallow the tablet whole. Do not split, crush, dissolve, or chew. Other important information I should know about LIVALO. LIVALO has not been studied to evalua Continue reading >>

10 Truths About Statins And High Cholesterol

10 Truths About Statins And High Cholesterol

For every drop of scientific evidence that statins are safe and effective, there is a tidal wave of misinformation. Our patients are concerned about statin side effects they’ve heard about from family or friends, or read about on the Internet. Statins are the “gold-standard” for high cholesterol treatment. They’re a powerful medication, and they’ve been proven to save the lives of many men and women living with or having a high risk of heart attack or stroke. But if statins are so effective, why are some people afraid to take them? As with any medication, there are risks associated with taking statins, but the benefits far outweigh the risks for the vast majority of high-risk patients. In an effort to put statin side effects into context and provide honest, scientific answers about statins and their use, we’ve put together a list of common questions our patients ask us: 1. How are doctors sure that statins really are safe and beneficial? Statins have been studied more than nearly any other drug that people take. In fact, more than 170,000 people who take statins have been studied in detail and for extended periods of time. We certainly know the benefits of statins. We also understand the risks of statins. In some instances, after doctors have prescribed a drug for 10 years or more, it is taken off the market because of unforeseen, adverse side effects. We’ve been prescribing statins since the 1990s for patients at high risk for stroke and heart disease. With statins, the side effects actually are well known. But how can we put that in perspective? Any focus on statin side effects needs to be counterbalanced by the fact that statins reduce people’s risk of dying from heart attack, heart disease, or stroke. Data from the 2008 JUPITER Trial suggest a 54 per Continue reading >>

Fighting Statin-induced Diabetes With Coq10

Fighting Statin-induced Diabetes With Coq10

Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs sold under trade names such as Lipitor® and Crestor®. They have been shown to benefit people at risk for heart disease caused by elevated LDL-cholesterol and/or C-reactive protein. For appropriate patients, statin drugs reduce cardiovascular death and disability rates.1-3 But despite these benefits, evidence suggests that statins, especially high doses of potent statins, may increase the risk, especially in older patients, of developing diabetes.3-6 Compelling data reveals that supplementing with CoQ10 can significantly reduce these glucose control issues. Facts about Statins and Diabetes Studies show that some statins, such as rosuvastatin (Crestor®), are associated with a 27% increased risk of developing new-onset type II diabetes.7 This is just one of many studies showing this harmful connection.4-6 One meta-analysis that utilized results from 13 statin studies involving more than 91,000 participants demonstrated an across-the-board increased diabetes risk of 9%,8 and found the highest risk in trials involving older subjects. Another meta-analysis showed that those taking higher doses of statins had a 12% higher risk of developing diabetes compared with subjects receiving “moderate” doses.9 These two alarming studies have made it apparent that older patients on more intensive statin regimens are at the greatest risk of developing diabetes from their treatment.3,10 Naturally, this poses a dilemma for anyone who is on, or considering starting, statin therapy. Is lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease worth the risk of developing diabetes which in turn could, paradoxically, increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease?6 Experts generally say it’s a worthwhile gamble, because the benefits for cardiovascular d Continue reading >>

How Statins Cause Diabetes

How Statins Cause Diabetes

IMPORTANT: FYI- If you are looking for loads of information on diabetes and how to feel better, check out The Diabetes World Summit 2016. I am one of the Presenters so when you sign up to hear the speakers discussing everything about this condition, you will get my interview instantly. CLICK HERE to sign up. When you are told you have high cholesterol, you assume it comes from eating too much fat, right? That’s what we’ve been told for years and after all, cholesterol is a lipid of “fat”… however, if you think high cholesterol is due to a high-fat diet, you’re wrong. Very little fat from foods actually becomes cholesterol. What makes high cholesterol is consumption of sugar, soda, candy, cake, potato chips, bread, pasta and other carbohydrates. High cholesterol and triglycerides almost always occur as a consequence of eating too many sweets, not butter or eggs! If your body turns excess sugar into cholesterol, and statins reduce the cholesterol formation, then where does all the sugar go when you take a statin drug? It’s a good question, and I need to give you an answer so you can get started down the path to getting well! If you tell your liver to “knock it off and stop making cholesterol”, then it’s going to push all that sugar (glucose) back out of the liver and into your blood stream, rather than turn it into cholesterol. It’s just going to lock the door and tell the sugar, “Get out!” You may know this already but just in case, when your doctor finds excess sugar in your blood, you’re told you have diabetes. Then you start driving in the fast lane of a multi-billion dollar business, one complete with shots, drugs and scary complications (amputations, blindness). Yet if we personally met and you told me you had diabetes, the first thing I Continue reading >>

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