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Do Statin Drugs Cause High Blood Sugar?

Beware: Statin Drugs Can Actually Cause Diabetes

Beware: Statin Drugs Can Actually Cause Diabetes

Statin drugs increase your likelihood of suffering exercise-related injury, according to a recent study, and the harmful effect increases with age Several recent studies have also concluded that statins can increase your risk of developing diabetes. One meta-analysis found that one out of every 498 people who are on a high-dose statin regimen will develop diabetes as a result of the drug, but the risk may be as high as one in 255 Statins provoke diabetes by raising your blood sugar- and insulin levels, and by robbing your body of certain valuable nutrients, such as vitamin D and CoQ10, which are both needed to maintain ideal blood glucose levels Like thalidomide, statin drugs are a class X drug with regard to pregnancy, meaning they are contraindicated and should NOT be taken by pregnant women If you’re on a statin drug, you MUST take CoQ10 to alleviate some of the most dangerous side effects By Dr. Mercola Tens of millions of Americans are taking cholesterol-lowering drugs - mostly statins - and some "experts" claim that many millions more should be taking them, including children as young as eight. I couldn't disagree more. Statins are HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, that is, they act by blocking the enzyme in your liver that is responsible for making cholesterol (HMG-CoA reductase). The enzyme that these drugs block is actually responsible for far more than making cholesterol. It also makes CoQ10 which is vital for your mitochondrial health. The fact that statin drugs cause side effects is well established - there are now 900 studies proving their adverse effects, which run the gamut from muscle problems to diabetes, to birth defects and increased cancer risk. Now you can add exercise-related muscle damage to the ever growing list of harmful side effects. Statins Can Continue reading >>

Statin Side Effects: Weigh The Benefits And Risks

Statin Side Effects: Weigh The Benefits And Risks

Statin side effects can be uncomfortable, making it seem like the risks outweigh the benefits of these powerful cholesterol-lowering medications. Doctors often prescribe statins for people with high cholesterol to lower their total cholesterol and reduce their risk of a heart attack or stroke. While statins are highly effective, they have been linked to muscle pain, digestive problems and mental fuzziness in some people and may rarely cause liver damage. Statins include atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Altoprev), pitavastatin (Livalo), pravastatin (Pravachol), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor). Having too much cholesterol in your blood increases your risk of heart attacks and strokes. Statins block a substance your liver needs to make cholesterol. This causes your liver to remove cholesterol from your blood. If you think you're experiencing side effects from statins, don't just stop taking the pills. Talk to your doctor to see if a change of dosage or even a different type of medication might be helpful. What are statin side effects? Muscle pain and damage One of the most common complaints of people taking statins is muscle pain. You may feel this pain as a soreness, tiredness or weakness in your muscles. The pain can be a mild discomfort, or it can be severe enough to make your daily activities difficult. Oddly enough, most randomized controlled studies of statins indicate that people taking statins develop muscle pain at the same rate as people taking placebo. But up to 29 percent of the people who start taking statins report muscle pain and many discontinue statins because of it. Many of these people do well when they are switched to a different variety of statin. Very rarely, statins can cause life-threatening muscle damage call Continue reading >>

Statin Use As A Moderator Of Metformin Effect On Risk For Prostate Cancer Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Statin Use As A Moderator Of Metformin Effect On Risk For Prostate Cancer Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients

OBJECTIVE Metformin and statins have shown promise for cancer prevention. This study assessed whether the effect of metformin on prostate cancer (PCa) incidence varied by statin use among type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study cohort consisted of 5,042 type 2 diabetic male patients seen in the Veteran Administration Health Care System who were without prior cancer and were prescribed with metformin or sulfonylurea as the exclusive hypoglycemic medication between fiscal years 1999 and 2005. Cox proportional hazards analyses were conducted to assess the differential hazard ratio (HR) of PCa due to metformin by statin use versus sulfonylurea use, where propensity scores of metformin and statin use were adjusted to account for imbalances in baseline covariates across medication groups. RESULTS Mean follow-up was ∼5 years, and 7.5% had a PCa diagnosis. Statin use modified the effect of metformin on PCa incidence (P < 0.0001). Metformin was associated with a significantly reduced PCa incidence among patients on statins (HR 0.69 [95% CI 0.50–0.92]; 17 cases/533 metformin users vs. 135 cases/2,404 sulfonylureas users) and an increased PCa incidence among patients not on statins (HR 2.15 [1.83–2.52]; 22 cases/175 metformin users vs. 186 cases/1,930 sulfonylureas users). The HR of PCa incidence for those taking metformin and statins versus those taking neither medication was 0.32 (0.25–0.42). CONCLUSIONS Among men with type 2 diabetes, PCa incidence among metformin users varied by their statin use. The potential beneficial influence on PCa by combination use of metformin and statin may be due to synergistic effects. Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer detected in men in the U.S., accounting for ∼28% of the new cancer burden. Risk for Continue reading >>

Study Uncovers Why Statins Increase Diabetes Risk And Offers Solution

Study Uncovers Why Statins Increase Diabetes Risk And Offers Solution

Statins are drugs that lower cholesterol in the body by interfering with the production of cholesterol in the liver. Though they lower bad cholesterol and raise good cholesterol, one side effect is that they increase risk of diabetes. Now, researchers have discovered why and offer a way to suppress this side effect. One of the world's most widely used drugs, statins have been hailed by the medical community for their ability to prevent heart disease. Still, the researchers, who have published their findings in the journal Diabetes, were confused as to why diabetes was linked to statin use. "Recently, an increased risk of diabetes has been added to the warning label for statin use," says lead author Jonathan Schertzer, assistant professor of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, and Canadian Diabetes Association Scholar. "This was perplexing to us," he continues, "because if you are improving your metabolic profile with statins you should actually be decreasing the incidence of diabetes with these drugs, yet, the opposite happened." According to the team, around 13 million people could be prescribed a statin drug at some point in their lives. In January of this year, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a Consumer Update outlining some of the risks associated with taking statins, which included an increased risk of raised blood sugar levels and the development of type 2 diabetes. At that time, Dr. Amy G. Egan, deputy director for safety in the FDA's Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology Products, said: Clearly we think that the heart benefits of statins outweighs this small increased risk. But what this means for patients taking statins and the health care professionals prescribing them is that blood-sugar levels may need to be assessed after instituting st Continue reading >>

Lipitor

Lipitor

What is Lipitor? Lipitor is a prescription drug manufactured by pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and used to control high cholesterol levels. By lowering cholesterol, the drug aims to prevent dangerous blockages in blood flow and thereby reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Lipitor in 1996. The drug’s active ingredient is atorvastatin calcium. This class of medications is generally well-tolerated; however, it has been associated with multiple risks, including: Lipitor belongs to a popular class of cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins, which represent the most widely prescribed class of drugs in the U.S. Lipitor is the most popular of all statins. Patients take statins to lower levels of cholesterol and other fatty substances in the blood that, if left unchecked, can increase the risk for heart attack, stroke and other related health complications. The liver makes most of the cholesterol found in blood. Statins reduce the amount of cholesterol made by the liver and help the liver remove cholesterol that’s already in the blood. How Lipitor Works Cholesterol plays a crucial role in several bodily processes that are essential to our health, but unhealthy levels of cholesterol can lead to buildup (plaque) on the walls of arteries. This can block blood flow to the brain and heart and put people at higher risk for stroke and heart disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. Lipitor prevents heart attack and stroke by lowering cholesterol in the blood. It slows the production of cholesterol in the body therefore decreasing the amount of plaque buildup that may block the flow of blood to the heart and brain. Stat Continue reading >>

Statins Side Effects

Statins Side Effects

Statins side effects are categorised in 1 of 4 categories Statins have attracted controversy in the past for their potentially dangerous side effects. Statins side effects usually fall into one of 4 categories. Statins side effects and indeed the drugs themselves have been studied in detail, and are known to be safe. Your GP or healthcare professional will be able to help you if you experience any statins side effects symptoms. Used alongside blood glucose control , statins are medically proven to cut cholesterol levels and decrease the likelihood of a cardiovascular event. Statins will commonly be prescribed to people that have already had a heart attack, stroke or peripheral artery disease . Statins side effects may include the following: Some studies have shown statins increase risk of depression and impair cognitive ability One statin, simvastatin, could lead to a rare kidney problem The FDA has warned that patients on statins are more likely to develop myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis in rare and serious cases Do statins increase risk of Parkinsons or Alzheimers? There is currently no evidence of a link between statins and Parkinsons or Alzheimers. Studies have indicated slightly higher fasting blood glucose levels in people with diabetes taking statins. The effect may be more pronounced in people taking larger statins doses. How are statins side effects influenced by the liver? Statins target liver cells where cholesterol is produced by the body. When your doctor is considering whether to put you on statins, you will have a blood test to check how well your liver functions. If your liver is affected, your doctor may change your medication or reduce your dose. Im on statins, should I change my diet to lower the risk of side effects? Your doctor should be able to Continue reading >>

What Statin Is Best For People With Diabetes?

What Statin Is Best For People With Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, you’re at a higher risk for heart disease and stroke. This makes it especially important to control other risk factors for cardiovascular problems, such as high cholesterol. Fortunately, there are medications called statins that are quite effective at lowering your low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad” cholesterol. Which statin is most appropriate if you have diabetes? It depends on your overall cardiovascular risk, but the recommendations lean toward a moderate-intensity or high-intensity statin. There are several different types of statins. Some are more potent than others. They each work a little differently, but they all help lower cholesterol by interfering with a substance your body needs to make cholesterol in the liver. Statins have become some of the most widely prescribed medications in the world. They include atorvastatin (Lipitor), rosuvastatin (Crestor), as well as other generic and brand name versions. The optimal LDL level for most healthy people is between 70 and 100 mg/dL. If your LDL numbers exceed that range, your doctor should look at your overall heart disease and stroke risk to decide whether you should be placed on statins. Recent guidelines presented by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association expanded the number of potential statin users. Doctors used to base their decision to prescribe a statin primarily on a person’s LDL score. Now, other risk factors are also considered. In general, statins are usually recommended for people who have: diagnosed cardiovascular disease an LDL cholesterol level of 190 mg/dL or higher diabetes and an LDL of 70 mg/dL or higher a 10-year heart attack risk of 7.5 percent or higher and an LDL of at least 100 mg/dL Statins and diabetes risk: What you need to Continue reading >>

Atorvastatin Lowers Cholesterol But Raises Blood Sugar

Atorvastatin Lowers Cholesterol But Raises Blood Sugar

As many as 40 million people may be taking statin-type cholesterol-lowering drugs daily in the U.S. Although medications like atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin can bring cholesterol levels down dramatically they can also raise blood glucose levels or make diabetes harder to control as this reader relates: Q. I used to have good blood sugar readings when I was on glyburide. Since I was put on atorvastatin to lower cholesterol I have had trouble with high blood sugar. I read in your Guide to Managing Diabetes that statins can affect blood glucose but the clinical pharmacist at the VA said you are wrong. She insisted that atorvastatin does not affect HbA1c or blood sugar. They now have me on both glipizide and Onglyza and the clinical pharmacist admitted that my HbA1c will not come down. She still insists I have to keep taking these medicines even if they are not working to control my diabetes. A. We are puzzled that your pharmacist was not aware of the official prescribing information for atorvastatin (Lipitor): “Increases in HbA1c and fasting serum glucose levels have been reported with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors [statins], including LIPITOR.” HbA1c is a measure of how high blood sugar levels have been over the past three months. Clinical trials and other studies have shown that statins can indeed raise blood sugar levels, making it harder to control diabetes. Blood Sugar and Statins: There is general agreement that statin therapy increases the risk of developing diabetes (Current Atherosclerosis Reports, Jan. 2015). Research has shown that there is a 10 to 12 percent increased incidence of new-onset type 2 diabetes in statin takers. The higher the dose and the more potent the statin the greater the risk. Investigators believe tha Continue reading >>

Simvastatin Side Effects: Diabetes & What Else

Simvastatin Side Effects: Diabetes & What Else

The Food and Drug Administration upset the applecart when it announced that statin-type cholesterol-lowering medications like simvastatin (Zocor) could raise blood sugar levels and increase the risk for diabetes. Millions of people with elevated cholesterol are trying desperately to reduce their likelihood of having a heart attack or a stroke. The last thing they need is to have their blood sugar go up, since that can increase the risk of the very complications people are trying to avoid (heart attacks and strokes, not to mention kidney damage, nerve pain and eye problems). The FDA has worded its warning cautiously: “A small increased risk of raised blood sugar levels and the development of Type 2 diabetes have been reported with the use of statins.” We are not so sure this is such a “small increased risk.” Eric Topol, MD, seems to agree with us. He is one of the country’s leading cardiologists. In an op-ed article published in the New York Times (March 4, 2012) titled, “The Diabetic Dilemma for Statin Users,” Dr. Topol points out that the way the data were analyzed could be misleading. The FDA lumped relatively “weak” statins together with more potent statins like atorvastatin (Lipitor), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor). With this data manipulation the FDA diluted the impact of potent statins on blood sugar increases. According to Dr. Topol, the stronger the statin and the higher the dose the greater the likelihood of diabetes. He states: “More than 20 million Americans take statins. That would equate to 100,000 new statin-induced diabetics. Not a good thing for the public health and certainly not good for the individual affected with a new serious chronic illness.” Amidst the statistics we tend to forget that individuals are affecte Continue reading >>

Asknadia: Do Statins Raise Blood Sugars Or Cause Diabetes

Asknadia: Do Statins Raise Blood Sugars Or Cause Diabetes

Dear Nadia, Is there a correlation between statin medications for cholesterol and diabetes? Lynn F Berkeley Ca Dear Lynn, Statins are important medications that reduce bad cholesterol that builds up in the arteries. They work by preventing the liver from producing LDL, the bad cholesterol. These medications also stabilize the lining of the blood vessels to prevent strokes and heart attacks. Statin Studies: In 2009, the Veterans Affairs conducted a study of 345,417 patients with and without diabetes, to see if taking cholesterol-lowering medication, increased their fasting plasma glucose. After a two-year period, they concluded that there was an increase in high blood sugars for both groups. Anther study in 2012 followed 153,840 patients who did not have diabetes and took statins. These were postmenopausal women between the ages of 50 to 79 years. The study concluded that there was a correlation found with hyperglycemia and diabetes for postmenopausal women. The outcome also questioned if a specific class of statins; more or less potent, influenced these results. The last study I found tied everything in because it was designed to see if the different statin potencies, influenced the onset of diabetes. The investigation revealed the higher potency statins such as Crestor (rosuvastatin), or the moderately potent Lipitor (atorvastatin) and Zocor (simvastatin), do put you at risk for developing diabetes. Physicians are now deciding what type of potency is best suited for their patients based on their genetic disposition and weight. If you need a lower potency statin, your physician might prescribe you Pravachol (Pravastatin ), Mevacor or Altoprev (lovastatin) to achieve a good LDL target. Source: AskNadia and receive her unique perspective on your question. Email Nadia at A Continue reading >>

Can Cholesterol Drugs Cause Diabetes?

Can Cholesterol Drugs Cause Diabetes?

For every prescription drug that is developed and offers benefits to patients, there are those that also pose significant risks. Physicians must always weigh the benefits to risks in order to make informed decisions as to whether a particular medication should be used for treatment. Recent findings suggest statins, a class of prescription drug used to treat high cholesterol levels, increase the risk of developing diabetes. No one argues the fact that statins are able to prevent major cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in patients who have already experienced a previous cardiovascular episode and are very likely to experience another one. But there is cause for concern over the widespread use of statins in patients with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and the potential for these patients to eventually develop another disease, diabetes. What Do Statins Do Exactly? Elevated blood cholesterol levels, specifically LDL (the bad kind), have been shown to increase a person’s risk of heart attacks and stroke. By testing LDL levels in patients, a fairly accurate prediction can be made of future cardiac events. [1] As more research has been gathered on the role of LDL levels and heart disease, national guidelines have called for optimal LDL cholesterol levels to be lowered. Enter statins. Statins have the ability to block a critical step in the formation of LDL cholesterol within the liver, hence, the overall level of LDL in the blood drops. Because of this, statins are currently the most commonly-prescribed class of drug used to treat high cholesterol. Until very recently, statins were thought to be safe and well tolerated by patients, though some studies reported temporary memory loss that disappeared once medication was switched. Though there is al Continue reading >>

Statins Raise Diabetes Risk: Experts Sound New Alarm Over Cholesterol Pill

Statins Raise Diabetes Risk: Experts Sound New Alarm Over Cholesterol Pill

Those on high doses of the cholesterol-busting pills are more prone to suffer dangerous spikes in blood sugar levels. Scientists say an unwanted by-product of the drug is a link to the chronic condition. Studies show those prescribed statins are less likely to develop heart disease but the downside is it appears to make them more vulnerable to Type 2 diabetes. Researchers found over-75s are a third more likely to be struck down if they are taking statins. But the risk increased to 50 per cent for those on higher doses of the tablets. Dr Mark Jones, who led the research, said: “We found almost 50 per cent of women in their late-70s and 80s in the study took statins and five per cent were diagnosed with new onset diabetes. What is most concerning was we found a ‘dose effect’ where the risk of diabetes increased as the dosage of statins increased. “Over the 10 years of the study most of the women progressed to higher doses of statins. GPs and their elderly female patients should be aware of the risks.” The study will reignite debate over the safety of a drug taken by millions of Britons each day. A large-scale British review last year showed statins were the safest and most effective way of preventing heart attack and stroke but they still remain highly controversial. Professor Alan Sinclair, director of the Foundation for Diabetes Research in Older People, said: “Statin use and increased diabetes risk is not new and clinicians must continue to minimise risk due to the adverse effects of these drugs by careful prescribing but at the same time recognise clear cardiovascular benefits from their use. We found almost 50 per cent of women in their late-70s and 80s in the study took statins “In older people, who are already at increased diabetes risk from other cau Continue reading >>

Do Statins Raise Odds For Type 2 Diabetes?

Do Statins Raise Odds For Type 2 Diabetes?

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins may lower your risk of heart disease, but also might boost the odds you'll develop type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. "In a group of people at high risk of type 2 diabetes, statins do seem to increase the risk of developing diabetes by about 30 percent," said the study's lead author, Dr. Jill Crandall. She's a professor of medicine and director of the diabetes clinical trials unit at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. But, she added, that doesn't mean anyone should give up on statins. "The benefits of statins in terms of cardiovascular risk are so strong and so well established that our recommendation isn't that people should stop taking statins, but people should be monitored for the development of diabetes while on a statin," she explained. At least one other diabetes expert agreed that statins are still beneficial for those at risk of heart trouble. Dr. Daniel Donovan Jr. is professor of medicine and director of clinical research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism Institute in New York City. "We still need to give statins when LDL (bad) cholesterol isn't under control. A statin intervention can lower the risk of a cardiovascular event by 40 percent, and it's possible the diabetes may have been destined to happen," he said. The new study is an analysis of data collected from another ongoing study. More than 3,200 adults were recruited from 27 diabetes centers across the United States for the study. The research goal was to prevent the progression of type 2 diabetes in people with a high risk of the disease, Crandall said. All of the study participants were overweight or obese. They also all Continue reading >>

Statins And Diabetes

Statins And Diabetes

Statins, the group of cholesterol-lowering drugs that includes atorvastatin (brand name Lipitor), simvastatin (Zocor), and rosuvastatin (Crestor), have been under increased scrutiny during the last couple of years as studies have linked them to an elevated risk of Type 2 diabetes. Most recently, as David Spero noted in a January blog post here at DiabetesSelfManagement.com, a study of statins in postmenopausal women found a 48% higher risk of diabetes among women who took one of these drugs compared with those who did not. Since this was not a randomized clinical trial, its results are not conclusive. But enough studies have raised concerns that last week, as a New York Times opinion piece notes, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) added a warning on diabetes risk to the label of all statins. As the Times piece explains, statins are the most widely prescribed drugs in the world, and they have been in use since the 1980’s. But more powerful statins have achieved widespread use only in the last decade or so, and it appears that these drugs are associated with the greatest diabetes risk. With 20 million Americans taking statins and an estimated risk of developing diabetes from the drugs of 1 in 200, 100,000 people could have diabetes as a result of these drugs. Furthermore, the piece notes, among people without existing heart disease who take statins, the drugs prevent only one heart attack or stroke for every 50 people taking them. Although it is clear from those numbers that statins provide no overwhelming heart-risk reduction or diabetes-risk increase to most people who take them, it is also clear that the heart-related benefit from these drugs is statistically greater than their diabetes-related risk. One particular study, published last year in the Journal of Continue reading >>

Statin Use And Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus

Statin Use And Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: STATINS IN DIABETES Statins are used for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Other benefits due to statins are not mediated by their lipid lowering properties[8] but due to its pleiotropic effects. In conditions like heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, vascular disease and hypertension the non-lipid lowering pleotropic benefits of statins have been observed[9]. These pleiotropic effects mediated by statins can be due to inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis which in turn inhibits intracellular signaling molecules Rho, Rac and Cdc42. The predominant mechanism that has been postulated is inhibition of Rho and its activation to Rho kinase[10]. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and insulin deficiency. The insulin resistance contributes to the abnormal lipid profile associated with type 2 diabetes[11]. Dyslipidemia contributes to increased cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes[12]. A linear relationship exists between cholesterol levels and cardiovascular diseases in diabetics even if we ignore the baseline LDL[13]. By predominantly lowering LDL-Cholesterol and due to minor effects on other lipoproteins, statins appear to be beneficial[12]. In Heart Protection Study which was done in diabetics, the decrease in cardiovascular events like first major coronary event, stroke were to the tune of 22% as compared to placebo[14]. It was recommended by American Diabetes Association that statin therapy should be initiated in individuals with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors with target LDL cholesterol of 100 mg/dL[15]. Investigators are also of the opinion that statin therapy should depend not on the LDL levels but the cardiovascular complications accompanying diabetes[16]. Other studies wh Continue reading >>

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