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Do Pickles Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Pickle Juice To Control Blood Sugar

Pickle Juice To Control Blood Sugar

Yes, I've tried this, it worked for a bit, then started making me throw up. You need to be aware, that if this helps you, in the short term, then it is the acid in the vinegar that is helping to lower blood glucose. This means that your stomach does not produce enough hydrochloric acid (HCl). Another thing, vinegar, acetic acid, is 1 of the waste acids our body ends up with after biological activity & these types of acids have to b filtered out by the kidneys. It adds to the over-all load of wastes acids. Our body don't like these floating around & can end up storing them in not so nice places, like joints & tissues. This can cause a great deal of pain & eventually damage. They can make you sick, give you headaches, migraines & the list could go on forever. When our stomachs don't produce enough HCl, any acid (in this case acetic acid) will be borrowed by the stomach to do what it needs done. This only recycles those nasty acids & pollutes your body. Eventually the load outstrips the body' ability to detox & other nasty things happen. HCl is the only inorganic acid our bodies make. It is clean & does many wonderful things for us. It also helps to detox our bodies. Get the real thing or find out how to increase your own output of it. It is a vital element on many fronts. cmt Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Things That Make Blood Sugar Control Easier

7 Surprising Things That Make Blood Sugar Control Easier

Being asleep. Being awake. Hot weather. Cold weather. Seems there’s no end to the number of things that can raise your blood glucose levels. No wonder diabetes management can be such an obstacle course. But it’s not all doom and gloom. For every factor that unexpectedly sends your blood sugars spiralling out of control, there’s an equally unexpected – and often enjoyable – way to keep them under control. 1. Peanut butter We know that peanuts are great for people with diabetes. But one group of researchers from Brazil were more interested in peanut butter (and why wouldn’t they be). The team split participants into three groups: the first ate 1.5 ounces of peanuts; the second had three tablespoons of peanut butter with breakfast; and the third had no peanut butter or peanuts. They all ate the same lunch of white bread and strawberry jam. Interestingly, the researchers found that the peanut butter was better for blood glucose levels than the peanuts. The second group felt fuller for long, and had lower blood sugars when they were tested after lunch. Not all peanut butter is as good for you, of course. But the researchers found that the healthier brands can do you a lot of good. Turns out that peanut butter has a lovely combination of high protein, fibre and healthy oils. So you no longer have to feel ashamed for eating it straight from the jar with a tablespoon. I certainly won’t. 2. Red wine Red wine lowers blood sugars by stopping the intestines absorbing glucose. Recently, plenty of researchers have become very interested in the effects of red wine on weight loss and blood glucose levels. A number of studies reckon it could be beneficial. That said, drinking too much of it can cause problems (such as a build-up of fat around the liver), so everything in m Continue reading >>

Are Pickles Bad For You? Side Effects Of Eating Too Many

Are Pickles Bad For You? Side Effects Of Eating Too Many

Are Pickles Bad For You? Side Effects Of Eating Too Many While pickles give you probiotics and antioxidants, it takes just 3 pickles (4") to cross your daily sodium quota, while 46 gherkins (3") cross the sugar quota. It's easy to have one too many, but when you do, pickles raise your blood pressure and blood sugar. Years of eating too many pickles can even put you at risk of stomach cancer. If you have high BP, diabetes, kidney or heart disease, and gastritis, limit intake and focus on fresh veggies. Love their sweet and sour flavor but worried whetherpickles are bad for you? A pickle has a lot to offer support to the helpful gut bacteria as a probiotic, fighting cell damage with its antioxidants, and ablood sugar-lowering effect,to name a few. Check these 6 benefits of pickles. If you eat in moderation, they can easily be among your daily serving of 5 veggies. But eat too many, and you are in trouble sadly, its entirely possible to overdose on pickles. They are high in sodium and sugar and have also been linked with cancers of the stomach and esophagus. Heres a look at what happens when you eat too many pickles. Sour Pickles Can Raise The Risk Of Heart And Kidney Problems In most cases, the pickling process involves the addition of a brine solution. So, like many preserved foods, pickles are very high in sodium. A small spear of a cucumber or kosher dill pickle packs in 283 mg sodium. A 4-inch-long pickle boasts a whopping 1092 mg.1 It takes just 3 pickles to cross your daily quota of sodium. Excess sodium increases the risk of heart and kidney diseases. Buy pickles that have low sodium, without compromising on the flavor. To put the numbers in perspective, a normal healthy adult shouldnt have more than 2,300 mg a day, that is 1 tsp salt.For a child aged 48 years, it Continue reading >>

Dill Pickle At Bedtime?

Dill Pickle At Bedtime?

My mother has been a (skinny) Type 2 diabetic since she was 30. She swears that a dill pickle before bed controls her DP. Anyone heard of this and has tried it? I am not a big pickle fan but would try it. I think it is the acidity. I have heard green apple, pickles, coleslaw. I think different things work for different people. Some find fat works better, peanut butter or cheese. I find for me I have to avoid all snacks after 8 pm or so or I will spike higher. DP is caused by our own hormones and the subsequent release of insulin. It is not caused by low bgs or not eating. If you don't have a good insulin response, DP will happen to most of us. A lot of us find depleting our glycogen through low carb diet or exercise often helps. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. I eat pickles, despite the high salt content, but not in the late evening. I like pickled peppers, or gardenia on my salads. My wife does not like a kiss after I have a pickle. There is a lot of vinegar in pickles, and vinegar is rumored to lower BG. A cucumber has 1 carb per ounce, so an average size cucumber has several carbs. On my dill pickle jar it says zero carbs for the cucumber pickles. What happened to the carbs? Were they neutralized by the vinegar? Type 1 for 72 years. Using the MM 630g pump, and Dexcom G5. A1c=6.1 Continue reading >>

A Spoonful Of Vinegar Helps The Sugar Go Down

A Spoonful Of Vinegar Helps The Sugar Go Down

2 tablespoons of vinegar before a meal even as part of a vinaigrette salad dressing—will dramatically reduce the spike in blood concentrations of insulin and glucose that come after a meal. A Spoonful of Vinegar Helps the Sugar Go Down Carol Johnston is a professor of nutrition at Arizona State University’s East campus. When she started developing menus to help prevent and control diabetes, she began with a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet worked amazingly well, but it involved major changes from the way people usually eat. Johnston feared they would give up and start downing Twinkies in no time. She wondered if there was an alternative. Johnston struck gold while reading through some older studies on diabetes. Actually, she struck vinegar. Her studies indicate that 2 tablespoons of vinegar before a meal—perhaps, as part of a vinaigrette salad dressing—will dramatically reduce the spike in blood concentrations of insulin and glucose that come after a meal. In people with type 2 diabetes, these spikes can be excessive and can foster complications, including heart disease In Johnston’s initial study, about one-third of the 29 volunteers had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, another third had signs that they could become diabetic, and the rest were healthy. The scientists gave each participant the vinegar dose or a placebo to drink immediately before they ate a high-carbohydrate breakfast consisting of orange juice, a bagel, and butter. A week later, each volunteer came back for the opposite premeal treatment and then the same breakfast. After both meals, the researchers sampled blood from the participants. Although all three groups in the study had better blood readings after meals begun with vinegar cocktails, the people with signs of future dia Continue reading >>

These Foods Can Help Lower Blood Sugar

These Foods Can Help Lower Blood Sugar

Diet is an important part of diabetes therapy. In fact, dietary changes are usually among the first recommendations that doctors give newly diagnosed diabetics. This article discusses the most healthful foods for diabetics and also how these foods can help lower blood sugar levels and reduce the risk of diabetes complications. The right diet for diabetics must be rich in fruits, nuts, whole grains and vegetables. A diabetes diet or MNT (medical nutrition therapy) for diabetes should also be low in fats and calories even as it packs natural nutrients. The chief aim of a diabetes diet is to help control blood sugar levels. This is done to prevent large fluctuations in blood sugar levels and also to manage body weight more effectively. Therefore, the right diabetes diet should significantly lower blood sugar and reduce the risks of cardiovascular, kidney and related diseases associated with diabetes. A diabetes diet is not a restrictive diet. Rather, it is simply a selection of healthful foods that can help lower blood sugar levels and improve insulin sensitivity. This means that the foods that make up a diabetes diet are highly recommended for diabetics and non-diabetics alike. Nuts Nuts are excellent sources of essential nutrients like magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, copper, selenium, folate, vitamin E and vitamin B2. They are also rich in proteins, fibers and natural antioxidants. Antioxidants like vitamin E and selenium can protect the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas from oxidative destruction. However, the most important reason for including nuts in a diabetes diet is their low glycemic index. With their high-fiber content and low glycemic index, nuts can reduce insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients. In addition, nuts contain unsaturated fats, Continue reading >>

A Spoonful Of Vinegar Helps The Sugar Go Down

A Spoonful Of Vinegar Helps The Sugar Go Down

Strange as it might seem, including some vinegar in your diet might improve your blood sugar. Though vinegar has a bit of a checkered past—it has too often been hyped in weight-loss diets and miracle cures—solid research has clearly shown that it can improve glycemic control. Vinegar has been widely consumed throughout Asia, and is considered a “functional food.” There is now modern research backing the ancient use of vinegar, particularly for keeping blood sugar levels under control, for both normal individuals and those with diabetes. The biologically active constituent of vinegar is acetic acid, which is also the source of the liquid’s lip-puckering pungency. Acetic acid inhibits the activity of several carbohydrate-digesting enzymes, including amylase, sucrase, maltase, and lactase. As a result, when vinegar is present in the intestines, some sugars and starches temporarily pass through without being digested, so they exert less of an impact upon blood sugar levels. Research tracking hemoglobin A1C in people with type 2 diabetes found that a daily dose of vinegar improved glycemic control, and was superior to dill pickles or vinegar in pill form. Because taking a teaspoon or two of vinegar alone seems to cause burping and acid reflux in a lot of people, it’s a good idea to combine vinegar with food. The easiest way of doing this is to use oil-and-vinegar salad dressings: balsamic, red wine, apple cider, or any flavored vinegars (avoid the fruity, sweet ones, of course, or you may cancel out the benefit.) When making the dressing, use about 50 to 75 percent vinegar, and add some minced garlic, dried oregano, and basil—or stir in a little Dijon mustard. You can also try vinaigrette dressings drizzled over steamed veggies such as cauliflower. Vinegar is a Continue reading >>

Drinking Pickle Juice: 10 Reasons It's All The Rage

Drinking Pickle Juice: 10 Reasons It's All The Rage

At first, drinking pickle juice might sound kind of gross. But there are several reasons to consider it. Athletes have been sipping this briny beverage for years. Experts didnt know all the reasons why pickle juice was good to drink after exercising. They just knew that it seemed to help relieve cramps. They were right. It appears to help with muscle cramps , plus more. Heres a look at 10 healthy benefits of drinking pickle juice. Dehydrated men experienced faster relief from muscle cramps after drinking pickle juice, according to a study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise . About 1/3 cup of pickle juice is all it took to have this effect. Pickle juice relieved cramps more than drinking the same amount of water. It also helped more than drinking nothing at all. This could be because the vinegar in pickle juice may help with rapid pain relief. Vinegar may help stop nerve signals that make tired muscles cramp. For most people, drinking water for hydration after a workout is fine. Water is probably all you need if youre exercising moderately or for an hour or less. But its a different story if youre exercising hard, exercising for longer than an hour at a time, or exercising in hot climates. Drinking something with sodium and potassium can help you get hydrated faster. Sodium is an electrolyte that you lose when you sweat. Potassium is another electrolyte lost in sweat. Pickle juice contains a lot of sodium. It also has some potassium. After a sweaty or lengthy exercise session, sipping some pickle juice can help your body recover to its normal electrolyte levels more quickly. Watching your sodium intake or on a low-sodium diet? Be sure to check with your doctor and dietitian about pickle juice before drinking it. If youre trying to lose weight, youre pr Continue reading >>

Pickles | Dailystrength

Pickles | Dailystrength

I sometimes think that my BS/BP/heart rate go hand in hand and other times it's not the case. I was told a faster pulse means higher sugar but sometimes I test low and my heart is still fast...Same thing with blood pressure, sometimes when it's lower so is the sugar but I have had times where they didn't coincide as well. That all being said, I will have to give pickles a try! possible since the vingegar that is used has many uses for it. I just spent half the day canning 20 pints and 8 quarts of bread and butter and dill (only 6 quarts are the dill) I use splenda for the bread and butter and you can't tell the diff and I can eat pickles for breakfast lol It's new to me. I love pickles and am going to give it a try. Thanks for the info! I woke up last night with a cramp in my ankle..I tried to walk it out..did not help..so I hit the pickle jar..and it went away. I reckon it is the vinegar..I don't know. Actually, this may not be too far fetched! An old home remedy for thinning your blood was a vinegar based one, also, in medieval times, patients were put on a diet of pickles for a couple of days before bleeding. I have looked through the internet and there are some sites that list pickles as a good food for diabetics so who knows? WOW! You might be onto a great discovery that will make someone millions. I love dill pickles, so will try this. As for the blood pressure issue-well, there is a lot of salt in dill pickles. I don't think lowering BS will lower your blood pressure. Maybe you ought to take your blood pressure along with your BS and let us know the results? I'd be interested. Thanks for sharing this. I'm going to eat a dill pickle today and if this works, and the word gets out, I'm buying shares in dill pickles. LOL. Actually the data is too new to form any pos Continue reading >>

Grass Diabetes: Pickles, Vinegar & Diabetes

Grass Diabetes: Pickles, Vinegar & Diabetes

Genetic Risk Assessment Scoring System for Diabetes Summeris hot and every bit avoidable, but what if I ask you to list the best thingsabout summer? Im sure initially it will be hard to list the positives ofsummer, but the fact is once you start jotting them down MANGO PICKLES will besure in the list. Yes,summer is the time we have seen our grandmas and our mothers looking for thoseperfect raw mangoes which will go well in making the lip smacking pickles andwill be stored in those big earthen urns for consumption throughout the year. Similarto pickles are vinegar which are generally made once and stored for the rest ofyear for consumption. Indian vinegar is eaten along with most kind of dishesfor enhancing the taste of food or simply to satisfy the taste buds of ourtongue J So,if you have been diabetic or are a pre-diabetic or one of those who areconcerned to know what all to eat and what to avoid for diabetes, what do youdo for pickles/ vinegar? Do you eat them? What are the causes and effects ofeating pickles or vinegar in diabetes? Let us know at the email address mentioned below/ contact us through our website. Generally,it is observed that people tend to eat pickles (leave the sweet pickles aside) andvinegar with meals which are high in carbohydrates. People who dont eatpickles with that high-carb food can see their blood sugar levels spike high,but the pickle-eaters are somehow immune. Whatcould be the reason for it? A few years ago, in an American research, theanswer was found by giving everyone a bit of vinegar with their meals. The patientsblood-sugar was measured after the meals. Then they gave the patients the samemeals without vinegar, and measured again.Itwas clearly observed that the vinegar slashed their bloodsugar after meals as much as 50 percent! In a Continue reading >>

Drinking Pickle Juice: Good Or Bad?

Drinking Pickle Juice: Good Or Bad?

Pickles have been considered a health food for centuries. Julius Caesar is said to have fed them to his troops to boost strength, and Cleopatra favored them as a beauty aid. The juice from pickles is also thought to have several health benefits and uses. It's claimed to enhance exercise performance, help control blood sugar and more. However, it's also high in salt. So is pickle juice really as healthy as it's claimed to be? This article sets the record straight. What is pickle juice? Pickles are said to date back to 2030 B.C., when cucumbers were preserved by travelers journeying from India to the Tigris Valley. Pickling requires three main ingredients: cucumbers, salt and water. The cucumbers are fermented by Lactobacillus bacteria, which normally cover the cucumber's skin. However, these beneficial probiotic bacteria are usually removed during commercial processing, and vinegar is added instead. After several weeks of curing, the cucumbers have transformed into pickles and are ready to eat. The juice is what remains once the pickles are removed. Bottom line: Pickling is a simple way to preserve cucumbers and other foods using salt, water and sometimes vinegar. Nutrients in pickle juice Here's what you can expect to find in 3.5 oz (100 ml) of pickle juice (1): Carbs: 0.4 grams. Calcium: 1-5% of the RDI. Sodium: 50-115% of the RDI. Potassium: 3% of the RDI. Magnesium: 3% of the RDI. Probiotics: Up to 10,700 colony-forming units per 3.5 oz (100 ml) (2). Bottom line: Pickle juice contains trace amounts of carbs, minerals and sometimes probiotic bacteria. It is also very high in sodium. Claimed health benefits and uses Pickle juice is rumored to have many different uses and health benefits. Here are a few of the most common claims: Claim: Pickle juice is beneficial for sp Continue reading >>

Dang! I Could've Had Sweet Pickles Instead! - Diabetes Self-management

Dang! I Could've Had Sweet Pickles Instead! - Diabetes Self-management

Im not perfect. In fact, Im far from perfect, especially when it comes to remembering what my CDE drove into my head about my diabetes care. Oh, I eventually remember what I should have done. Way too long after I should have done it. Take last weekend, for example. My blood glucose ran high most of Sunday. I would program my pump to give me insulin, but it didnt seem to make a lot of difference. I put it down to having eaten more fat than usual and kept correcting, and correcting, and correcting to no avail. Had I been thinking, I would have given myself some insulin by injection after failing to bring my numbers down a couple of times. If I had, I might have noticed that my insulin pumps infusion set had come out. No wonder my numbers were high: All of the insulin I had been giving myself had been soaking into my skivvies instead of being infused into me. So I eventually got my numbers down, after finally putting in a new infusion set. In fact, they went down. And down. And downuntil about 4 AM, when I woke up, shaking, sweating, and starving. A check of my blood glucose showed that it was in the 50s. Odd. Why odd? Ive been known to carry on perfectly lucid conversations with doctors and nurses without either of us knowing my glucose was somewhere in the 30s. In fact, during the time I had a visiting nurse as a part of my recuperation from one of my recent surgeries, the place that did my lab work called one afternoon to ask if I was OK. Your sugar was 42 this morning, the person answered. Heck, I had no idea. Nor did the nurse who drew the blood, changed my dressing, and schmoozed with me for awhile. I normally dont have any symptoms of being hypoglycemic and, if my continuous glucose monitor (CGM) is warming up at the time or if Im not wearing it I dont get an alarm Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes

OK, y’all. I wrote about this several years ago, but now I’m serious. If you want to control any type of diabetes better, consume vinegar before meals and at bedtime. Start today! It lowers post-meal and fasting glucose levels. In a study from Arizona State University, subjects took a drink of 20 grams of apple cider vinegar, 40 grams of water, and 1 teaspoon of saccharin with each meal. (I think stevia might be better than saccharin.) Those with insulin resistance who drank the vinegar had 34% lower postprandial (after-meal) glucose compared to controls. These postprandial benefits had been found before. It was thought that vinegar might slow the absorption of carbohydrate into the blood, or slow the breakdown of starches into sugars. This effect would mimic the effect of drugs like acarbose (brand name Precose). But the 2004 study cited above reported that vinegar reduced postprandial glucose more in subjects who were highly insulin resistant. The authors say this result shows that vinegar increases insulin sensitivity, perhaps acting similarly to metformin. Now studies have found that vinegar at bedtime reduces fasting blood glucose in the morning, indicating that vinegar might promote insulin production, like nateglinide (Starlix). Pretty amazing that a simple chemical like vinegar (acetic acid) could have the benefits of three different classes of diabetes drugs, and all for a few cents a dose! It’s likely good for both Type 2 and Type 1, especially for lowering postprandial glucose. And postprandial glucose levels account for 30% to 70% of A1C values. Vinegar has got to be the most cost-effective medicine in history, but most people with diabetes still aren’t taking it. And doctors aren’t prescribing it. Why not? Is it because there are no “vinegar rep Continue reading >>

Glycemic Index For Dill Pickles

Glycemic Index For Dill Pickles

A plate of dill pickles on a table.Photo Credit: rojoimages/iStock/Getty Images Stephanie Lee began writing in 2000 with concentration on food, travel, fashion and real estate. She has written for Amnesty International and maintains three blogs. Lee holds a Bachelor of Arts in international relations from the University of California, Irvine, and an M.B.A. from Concordia University. The process of pickling cucumbers in a mixture of vinegar, herbs, salt and sugar results in a product commonly called pickles. The dill pickle variety, according to the New York Food Museum, is a favorite among consumers. Not only do dill pickles make a nutritious accompaniment in a sandwich or a salad, they also rank extremely low on the glycemic index scale. To determine the glycemic index of a food product, human subjects must ingest the product before researchers study its effect on blood-glucose levels. Linus Pauling Institute explains that test volunteers are administered 50g of a test food on any given day, followed by 50g of a control food, which contains an equal amount of carbohydrates as the test food, on a later day. Blood is drawn before consumption, as well as several hours after consumption at regular intervals, to note changes in blood-glucose levels. The results are plotted as a curve and the glycemic index is calculated by dividing the area beneath the curve post-consumption of the test food by the corresponding area of the control food. The glycemic index is a measure of a food product's ability to elevate blood-glucose levels. Foods with a minimal impact on blood-glucose levels have a glycemic index of 55 or less. Foods with a moderate impact on blood-glucose levels have a glycemic index of between 56 and 69. Food products with a glycemic index above 69 have a significan Continue reading >>

5 Tasty Foods That Can Actually Lower Your Blood Sugar

5 Tasty Foods That Can Actually Lower Your Blood Sugar

5 Tasty Foods That Can Actually Lower Your Blood Sugar By Lydia Quinn | Submitted On April 05, 2009 With the rising epidemic of obesity and diabetes in the world, it is important to take steps to prevent these serious diseases. Here are some foods that can help to lower and control your blood sugar, if they are added to your diet: A recent Swedish university study showed that eating pickles or adding vinegar to your meal can reduce your blood sugar levels by up to 50%. In addition to pickles, most anything with acetic acid in it, such as vinegar, has a similar effect. It's relatively easy to incorporate vinegar into a meal, just use a vinegar based salad dressing on your salad or use it as a dip for vegetables. Pickles and vinegar works by slowing down or stopping the carbohydrates you ate with the meal from breaking down in your stomach, thus it is absorbed slowly, which stops it from being converted to sugar quickly. The effect is not the same if you consume bread and butter type pickles, as those contain sugar. A recent study testing the effects of almonds on blood sugar had surprising results. People who ate about 2 ounces of almonds after eating a piece of sliced white bread had significantly lower blood sugar than those who did not eat the almonds. The study also showed similar results when testing with mashed potatoes and rice. Almonds are rich in antioxidants and other vitamins and minerals, so they are an excellent addition to anyone's diet, whether you have blood sugar problems or not. High in fiber and carotenoids, sweet potatoes are also high in antioxidants that have been shown to help your body better respond to insulin. Skip the brown sugar and syrupy canned varieties, however, as they won't have the same effect. This includes flax seeds and flax oil sup Continue reading >>

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