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Do People With Diabetes Have High Blood Pressure?

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Exercise for High Blood Pressure | Best Exercise to Reduce High Blood Pressure Is it Safe To Exercise? If You Have High Blood Pressure, Your Your Doctor Might Suggest You To Try Exercise More to Reduce It. But, You Might Worry that Exercising Would Rise Your Blood Pressure to Risky Levels. Below Is Table For General Idea of What Blood Pressure Levels If Exercise Necessary, Keep in Mind Every Person is NOT the same & Your Doctor May Agree Differently. 140/90 179/99 It Should be Safe to Start Increase Your Physical Activity 180/100 199/109 Consult Your Doctor Before Getting Into New Activity 200/110 or above Do NOT Begin Any New Activity or Consult Your Doctor Exercise Safe By Always Get Advice from Your Doctor Before You Start Any Physical Activity If You Have High Blood Pressure, Focus on Certain Activities Can Help Improve Your Heart & Blood Vessels. Aerobic Exercise Best To helps Your Heart Because Of Repetitive & Rhythmic, Also Work On Large Muscle of Legs, Shoulders & Arms. Below Also Activities Good for Your Blood Pressure Cycling Brisk walking Swimming Dancing Mowing the lawn Tennis Jogging You Must NOT do Any Activity that is Very Intensive For Short Amount of Time.

High Blood Pressure

Definition Blood pressure is a measurement of the force exerted against the walls of your arteries as your heart pumps blood to your body. Hypertension is the term used to describe high blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are given as two numbers. The top number is called the systolic blood pressure. The bottom number is called the diastolic blood pressure. For example, 120 over 80 (written as 120/80 mm Hg). One or both of these numbers can be too high. (Note: These numbers apply to people who are not taking medicines for blood pressure and are not ill.) Normal blood pressure is when your blood pressure is lower than 120/80 mm Hg most of the time. High blood pressure (hypertension) is when your blood pressure is 140/90 mm Hg or above most of the time. If your blood pressure numbers are 120/80 or higher, but below 140/90, it is called pre-hypertension. If you have heart or kidney problems, or you had a stroke, your doctor may want your blood pressure to be even lower than that of people who do not have these conditions. Causes Many factors can affect blood pressure, including: The amount of water and salt you have in your body The condition of your kidneys, nervous system, or bl Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Emily Fisher

    I will probably need antidepressants and other psych medications my entire life, too.
    You know what else I will be dependent on? Food. Water. Sleep. Shelter.
    Dependency isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Your prescribed medications that you are using responsibly and as directed aren’t the same as being an alcoholic or being addicted to street drugs.
    Many chronically ill people are dependent on medications for the rest of their life, not just mentally ill people.

    Bottom line, don’t feel discouraged for taking medications to keep yourself healthy. If your medications are helping you function and live a better life, don’t feel bad about needing them.

  2. Ron Davis

    As you get older, you gradually need increasingly numerous medications to maintain health. That may not sound like encouragement, because growing old has its downsides. However, aging is a lot better than the alternative. You just slot the medications into your normal routine, and hardly notice that you are taking them, until you stop and think of the difference in your life that they make.

  3. Andy Wilkinson

    Welcome to the club.
    The goal, at least for me, is to reduce the quantity and types of medications. I believe that there are alternatives that can be optimized for the person, thereby reducing the need for (as much) medication.
    Namely, actively engaging in the treatment plan every day. That would usually include daily exercise, quality sleep, creating an environment that is healthy and immersing one’s self in it. Figure out what works for you and do it.

    It’s about quality of life. If the side effects of the medications are such that they make things worse in other ways, then it is not worth taking them (as much).

  4. -> Continue reading
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Aging With Hemophilia

Learning how to take care of yourself in the face of age-related issues is just as important to people with hemophilia as it is to the rest of the population. Understanding age-related issues As we get older, we’re bound to encounter changes in our health that come with age. The difference for someone with a bleeding disorder is that they may be at higher risk for certain age-related issues. Also, these secondary conditions need to be managed carefully, as they may cause or worsen other problems related to hemophilia. In the past, little was known about the effects of age-related conditions on those within the community. Now, we understand that many of the health concerns the rest of the population faces as they get older may also affect people with hemophilia. As you age, you should be aware of your risk for the following conditions and the challenges with treating them in the presence of hemophilia. High blood pressure People with hemophilia are twice as likely to have abnormally high blood pressure (or hypertension). Because this condition can increase your risk of bleeding regardless of the presence of hemophilia, you should have your blood pressure checked often and – if y Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Emily Fisher

    I will probably need antidepressants and other psych medications my entire life, too.
    You know what else I will be dependent on? Food. Water. Sleep. Shelter.
    Dependency isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Your prescribed medications that you are using responsibly and as directed aren’t the same as being an alcoholic or being addicted to street drugs.
    Many chronically ill people are dependent on medications for the rest of their life, not just mentally ill people.

    Bottom line, don’t feel discouraged for taking medications to keep yourself healthy. If your medications are helping you function and live a better life, don’t feel bad about needing them.

  2. Ron Davis

    As you get older, you gradually need increasingly numerous medications to maintain health. That may not sound like encouragement, because growing old has its downsides. However, aging is a lot better than the alternative. You just slot the medications into your normal routine, and hardly notice that you are taking them, until you stop and think of the difference in your life that they make.

  3. Andy Wilkinson

    Welcome to the club.
    The goal, at least for me, is to reduce the quantity and types of medications. I believe that there are alternatives that can be optimized for the person, thereby reducing the need for (as much) medication.
    Namely, actively engaging in the treatment plan every day. That would usually include daily exercise, quality sleep, creating an environment that is healthy and immersing one’s self in it. Figure out what works for you and do it.

    It’s about quality of life. If the side effects of the medications are such that they make things worse in other ways, then it is not worth taking them (as much).

  4. -> Continue reading
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This video provides seven tips to lowering and controlling your blood pressure. These tips may help prevent or reduce your risk of hypertension. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, a nonprofit mutual insurance company, is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. BCBSM provides and administers health benefits to more than 4.4 million members residing in Michigan in addition to employees of Michigan-headquartered companies who reside outside the state. For more company information, visit http://www.bcbsm.com and http://www.MiBluesPerspectives.com.

Managing Hypertension (high Blood Pressure)

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a silent killer that can be caused by Insulin Resistance-related weight gain and obesity. When The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute revised its blood pressure guidelines, almost 23 million American men who thought they were in the clear suddenly found themselves in a new danger zone called “Pre-Hypertensive.” You are included in this category if your systolic blood pressure is between 120 and 139 or your diastolic blood pressure is between 80 and 89. Regard it as a wake-up call to take steps to avoid a stroke further down the road. What exactly are systolic and diastolic blood pressures? Blood pressure is commonly measured by wrapping an inflatable cuff around the upper arm. Air is pumped into the cuff until circulation is cut of, and when a stethoscope is placed over the cuff, there is silence. Then, as the air is slowly let out of the cuff, blood begins to flow again and can be heard through the stethoscope. This is the point of greatest pressure, called systolic, and is usually expressed as how high it forces a column of mercury to rise in a tube. At its highest normal pressure, the heart should send a column of mercury to a h Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Emily Fisher

    I will probably need antidepressants and other psych medications my entire life, too.
    You know what else I will be dependent on? Food. Water. Sleep. Shelter.
    Dependency isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Your prescribed medications that you are using responsibly and as directed aren’t the same as being an alcoholic or being addicted to street drugs.
    Many chronically ill people are dependent on medications for the rest of their life, not just mentally ill people.

    Bottom line, don’t feel discouraged for taking medications to keep yourself healthy. If your medications are helping you function and live a better life, don’t feel bad about needing them.

  2. Ron Davis

    As you get older, you gradually need increasingly numerous medications to maintain health. That may not sound like encouragement, because growing old has its downsides. However, aging is a lot better than the alternative. You just slot the medications into your normal routine, and hardly notice that you are taking them, until you stop and think of the difference in your life that they make.

  3. Andy Wilkinson

    Welcome to the club.
    The goal, at least for me, is to reduce the quantity and types of medications. I believe that there are alternatives that can be optimized for the person, thereby reducing the need for (as much) medication.
    Namely, actively engaging in the treatment plan every day. That would usually include daily exercise, quality sleep, creating an environment that is healthy and immersing one’s self in it. Figure out what works for you and do it.

    It’s about quality of life. If the side effects of the medications are such that they make things worse in other ways, then it is not worth taking them (as much).

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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