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Do People With Diabetes Have High Blood Pressure?

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia is a hallmark sign of diabetes (both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes) and prediabetes. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone-secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Severely elevated glucose levels can result in a medical emergency like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS, also referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state). Insulin is the treatment of choice for people with type 1 diabetes and for life-threatening increases in glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes may be managed with a combination of different oral and injectable medications. Hyperglycemia due to medical conditions other than diabetes is generally treated by treating the underlying condition responsible for the elevated glucose. Blood Sugar Swings: Tips for Managing Diabetes & Glucose Levels A number of medical conditions can cause hyperglycemia, but the most common by far is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes affects over 8% of the total U.S. population. In diabetes, blood glucose levels rise either because there is an insufficient amount of insulin in the body or the body cannot use insulin well. Normally, the pancreas releases insulin after a meal so that the cells of the body can utilize glucose for fuel. This keeps blood glucose levels in the normal range. Type 1 diabetes is responsible for about 5% of all cases of diabetes and results from damage to the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is far more common and is related to the body's inability to effectively use insulin. In addition to type 1 and type 2, gestational diabe Continue reading >>

Health Information

Health Information

If you have diabetes you should aim to keep your blood pressure well controlled. Having high blood pressure (hypertension) is one of several risk factors that can increase your chance of developing heart disease, a stroke and some other complications. Treatment includes a change in lifestyle risk factors where these can be improved. Many people with diabetes need to take medication to lower their blood pressure. What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the pressure of blood in your blood vessels (arteries). Blood pressure is measured in millimetres of mercury (mm Hg). Your blood pressure is recorded as two figures - for example, 124/80 mm Hg. This is said as 124 over 80. The top (first) number is the systolic pressure. This is the pressure in the arteries when the heart contracts. The bottom (second) number is the diastolic pressure. This is the pressure in the arteries when the heart rests between each heartbeat. What is high blood pressure? This is not as simple to answer as it may seem. In general, the higher the blood pressure, the greater the risk to health. Depending on various factors, the level at which blood pressure is said to be high (hypertension) can vary from person to person. The cut-off point for blood pressure that is said to be high is 140/80 mm Hg or above for people with diabetes and 130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes and complications (for example, kidney disease). These are lower than the cut-off point for people who do not have diabetes. Note: high blood pressure actually means that your blood pressure remains above the cut-off point each time it is taken. That is, your blood pressure is sustained at a level higher than it should be and is not just a one-off high reading when you happen to be stressed. High blood pressure can be: Just a high sy Continue reading >>

Why Is There A Warning About Heart Disease, High Blood Pressure Or Diabetes?

Why Is There A Warning About Heart Disease, High Blood Pressure Or Diabetes?

Contac® Cold + Flu advises patients suffering from heart disease, high blood pressure and/or diabetes to consult with their doctor before using Contac. Decongestants in cold medicines decrease the size of enlarged blood vessels in nasal passages, but they can also affect blood vessels in the rest of your body and raise blood pressure. For most people, this increase isn’t significant. However, some people (especially those who already have high blood pressure) can have exaggerated responses to decongestants, contributing to dangerously high blood pressures. As stated on the label, check with your doctor before using Contac Cold + Flu if you have liver disease, heart disease, thyroid disease, diabetes, glaucoma, high blood pressure, trouble urinating due to an enlarged prostate gland (if male), or a breathing problem such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Frequently Asked Questions Continue reading >>

The Best Thing You Can Do To Prevent High Blood Pressure

The Best Thing You Can Do To Prevent High Blood Pressure

People with diabetes are generally, as a group, at risk for developing high blood pressure. Aside from managing blood sugars, here are some things that can help you prevent high blood pressure: eat healthy exercise regularly quit smoking don’t drink too much alcohol manage stress But did you know there is something not on that list that researchers say is the number one most effective thing you can do to prevent high blood pressure? Maintaining a Healthy Weight #1 Behavior Keeping your weight in a healthy range is the most effective thing you can do to help yourself avoid hypertension according to researchers of a new study. In their press release, they state that keeping a healthy weight is the best thing you can do as you go into middle age and that their findings indicate the need to focus on helping people attain and keep a healthy weight. The study was funded by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. John N. Booth III, a postdoctoral fellow of the AHA’s Strategically Focused Hypertension Research Network a the University of Alabama in Birmingham said, “We looked specifically at the long-term impact of maintaining healthy behaviors on changes in blood pressure between early and middle-age adulthood.” They studied the impact of doing the following on blood pressure over 25 years: keeping a healthy weight (BMI below 25 kg/m2) never smoking zero to seven alcoholic drinks weekly for women and zero to 14 for men 150 minutes or more of moderate to vigorous exercise per week eating a healthy diet (based on following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension eating plan). They looked at 4,630 young adults between 18 and 30 years of age who took part in the Coronary Artery Risk Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

High blood sugar (glucose) that circulates in the bloodstream instead of being absorbed into cells damages nerves and blood vessels throughout the body and, ultimately, the major organs such as the kidneys and heart. It has been said that there isn’t a system in the body that isn’t affected by diabetes. The good news is that diabetes can be managed and the risk of developing complications significantly reduced. A nationwide study conducted from 1983-1993 called the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial showed that when blood sugar levels are checked consistently throughout the day – and kept close to normal – complications of the disease can be reduced by as much as 70 percent. This method is also referred to as "tight control" of blood sugar and has become standard of care in diabetes management. Diabetic Neuropathy (Nerve Damage) Approximately 60-70 percent of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nerve damage. Often the first symptoms of diabetes are tingling, numbness or pain in some part of the body, which is an indication that nerves have been damaged. Neuropathy from diabetes can affect many different parts of the body, including the lower limbs (legs, feet), the bladder and the gastrointestinal tract. Several theories exist as to why diabetes has such a devastating effect on the nervous system. One theory holds that excess sugar in the bloodstream reacts negatively with an enzyme in the cells surrounding the nerves and damages them. Another theory suggests that decreased blood flow to nerves, from damaged blood vessels caused by diabetes, results in neuropathy. In general, there are three types of neuropathy: sensory, autonomic and motor. Sensory neuropathy is the most common, affecting how we perceive temperature, texture and pain. Autono Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the pressure of blood in your blood vessels (arteries). Blood pressure is measured in millimetres of mercury (mm Hg). Your blood pressure is recorded as two figures - for example, 124/80 mm Hg. This is said as 124 over 80. The top (first) number is the systolic pressure. This is the pressure in the arteries when the heart contracts. The bottom (second) number is the diastolic pressure. This is the pressure in the arteries when the heart rests between each heartbeat. What is high blood pressure? This is not as simple to answer as it may seem. In general, the higher the blood pressure, the greater the risk to health. Depending on various factors, the level at which blood pressure is said to be high (hypertension) can vary from person to person. The cut-off point for blood pressure that is said to be high is 140/80 mm Hg or above for people with diabetes and 130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes and complications (for example, kidney disease). These are lower than the cut-off point for people who do not have diabetes. Note: high blood pressure actually means that your blood pressure remains above the cut-off point each time it is taken. That is, your blood pressure is sustained at a level higher than it should be and is not just a one-off high reading when you happen to be stressed. High blood pressure can be: Just a high systolic pressure - for example, 170/70 mm Hg. Just a high diastolic pressure - for example, 120/104 mm Hg. Both - for example, 170/110 mm Hg. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? A one-off blood pressure reading which is high does not mean that you have high blood pressure (hypertension). Your blood pressure varies throughout the day. It may be high for a short time if you are anxious, stressed or have just been Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

People with diabetes are more likely to also have high blood pressure or hypertension. High blood pressure can increase the risk of diabetes complications such as diabetic eye and kidney problems. Managing blood pressure will be a part of a person's overall diabetes care plan. Diabetes and high blood pressure complications Having diabetes increases your risk of developing high blood pressure and other cardiovascular problems, because diabetes adversely affects the arteries, predisposing them to atherosclerosis - narrowing of the arteries. Atherosclerosis can cause high blood pressure, which if not treated, can lead to further blood vessel damage, and stroke, heart failure, heart attack, and kidney failure. Compared with people with normal blood pressure readings, men and women with hypertension have an increased risk of: Strokes Peripheral vascular disease (narrowing of the arteries in the legs and feet) Heart failure Even high yet normal blood pressure or pre-hypertension (defined as 120-139/ 80-89 millimetres of mercury or mmHg) has an impact on your health. Studies show that people with normal yet high range blood pressure readings, over a 10-year period of follow up time, had a two to three-fold increased risk of heart disease. What should blood pressure be if you have diabetes? Blood pressure readings vary, but in general if someone has diabetes their blood pressure should be less than 130/80 mmHg. The first number is the "systolic pressure" or the pressure in the arteries when your heart beats and fills the arteries with blood. The second number is the "diastolic pressure" or the pressure in the arteries when your heart rests between beats, filling itself with blood for the next contraction. Having normal blood pressure is as important in managing diabetes as havi Continue reading >>

Sepsis And Diabetes

Sepsis And Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (life-long) autoimmune disease that has a significant impact on your life. Having diabetes means you must work to control your blood glucose (sugar) levels to be sure that they don’t get too high or too low. The amount of glucose in your blood is important. Your body needs glucose for energy, but too much of it can destroy body tissues and too little can starve your body of nutrients. People who have diabetes are also at risk of developing wounds and sores that don’t heal well. While the wounds are present, they are at high risk of developing infection. And, again because of the diabetes, the infections can get severe quickly. When infection overwhelms the body, the body can respond by developing sepsis and going into septic shock. Sometimes incorrectly called blood poisoning, sepsis is the body’s often deadly response to infection. Sepsis kills and disables millions and requires early suspicion and rapid treatment for survival. Sepsis and septic shock can result from an infection anywhere in the body, such as pneumonia, influenza, or urinary tract infections. Worldwide, one-third of people who develop sepsis die. Many who do survive are left with life-changing effects, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic pain and fatigue, organ dysfunction (organs don’t work properly) and/or amputations. What is diabetes? Your pancreas is a small organ (about 6” by 1.5”) that is part of your digestive system. It is connected to your small intestine and it lies just below your stomach towards the back. Your pancreas has a few roles, one is to help digest the food you eat and another is to secrete (send out) insulin, which stimulates your cells to use the glucose in the food and drink you consume. When a person has diabetes, the pancre Continue reading >>

Hypertension: Symptoms And Treatment

Hypertension: Symptoms And Treatment

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a serious disease that can, over time, damage the blood vessel walls and increase a person's risk of heart attack, stroke and other conditions. Blood pressure is recorded as two numbers and written as a ratio: the top number, called the systolic pressure, is the pressure as the heart beats. The bottom number, called the diastolic pressure, is the measurement as the heart relaxes between beats. According to guidelines announced in November 2017 by the American Heart Association (AHA), people's blood pressure measurements fall into the following categories: Normal: Less than 120 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) for systolic and 80 mm Hg for diastolic. Elevated: Between 120-129 for systolic, and less than 80 for diastolic. Stage 1 hypertension: Between 130-139 for systolic or between 80-89 for diastolic. Stage 2 hypertension: At least 140 for systolic or at least 90 mm Hg for diastolic. Causes Most of the time, doctors cannot find a specific cause of hypertension, and this is known as essential hypertension. Certain factors increase the risk of developing hypertension, including being obese, drinking too much alcohol, eating a lot of salt, smoking and having diabetes. Aging also increases the risk of hypertension because blood vessels become stiffer with age, the NIH says. About 65 percent of U.S. adults ages 60 and older have high blood pressure, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). Being under stress can also increase your blood pressure temporarily, but stress is not a proven risk factor for hypertension. Still, some studies have linked mental stress and depression with risk of high blood pressure. A 2003 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that people who felt pres Continue reading >>

Smoothies For Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Smoothies For Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

The smoothie is a popular drink that has been gaining a lot of traction lately. Everyone is into the smoothie craze. There are some that can help you lose weight fast, and there are some intended to increase energy. There are even smoothies for diabetes and smoothies for high blood pressure. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the amount of sugar in your blood is too high. This happens because of two things. First, your body either does not respond to insulin. Or second, your body can’t produce insulin. Insulin is responsible for turning sugar into food for your body’s cells. There are two types of diabetes. First is type 1, where your body cannot produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes is when your body can’t use insulin or can’t produce the right amount of insulin your body needs. What Is High Blood Pressure? This condition is also known as hypertension. It is known as the “silent killer.” This is because it has no obvious symptoms. Many people are not aware if they have it. High blood pressure means your blood is pumping through your heart and blood vessels with too much force. Relationship between Diabetes and High Blood Pressure It is not known why there is a connection between the two diseases. However, it is widely assumed that obesity, inactivity, and a high-fat and high-sodium diet lead to both conditions. Around 25 percent of people with type 1 diabetes have high blood pressure. In addition, 80 percent of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have high blood pressure. People with diabetes have to constantly monitor their blood pressure. Luckily, even if you have the two conditions, that doesn’t mean you have to miss out. Here are smoothies for diabetes and high blood pressure you can try for yourselves. Smoothies for Diabetes Smoothies for d Continue reading >>

How To Treat Cold And Flu Symptoms If You Have Diabetes

How To Treat Cold And Flu Symptoms If You Have Diabetes

People with diabetes are at increased risk of being infected with the cold or flu virus because their immune systems can be weaker than someone else who does not have diabetes. To complicate matters, it can be hard to keep blood sugars controlled when you get sick. While the body tries to fight the illness, hormones are released that cause blood sugars to rise and interfere with the blood-glucose lowering effects of insulin, making diabetes harder to control. How you manage your diabetes when you are sick is important. Medications for Treating Cold and Flu Symptoms in Diabetics One of the questions that comes up often is, what can someone with diabetes take that is over the counter if they do get sick? This can be confusing because there are so many brands of cold and flu medications to choose from. You can buy single symptom medicines that treat just coughs or just nasal congestion. Or you can buy a product that will help with several symptoms at once. The trick is to know what ingredients are in the medications that you buy, and how they will affect your diabetes. Ingredients on the labels fall under two categories: inactive and active. Inactive ingredients don't have medicinal value. They are typically fillers, flavorings, colorings, and substances that help with consistency. Active ingredients are the drugs that actually treat the symptoms. Find out the ingredients of your typical over-the-counter medicines and how they can affect your diabetes: Inactive Ingredients That May Affect Diabetes Alcohol or sugar are non-pharmacological ingredients that may be in the cold and flu medicine you are taking. They may be listed under "inactive ingredients" on the label. Both alcohol and sugar will affect your blood glucose levels. These can cause blood sugars to rise. Active I Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure 'increases Risk Of Diabetes By 60%'

High Blood Pressure 'increases Risk Of Diabetes By 60%'

INDYPULSE High blood pressure 'increases risk of diabetes by 60%' Having high blood pressure raises your risk of developing diabetes by 60 per cent, a major global study has confirmed. Although a well-known risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the links between high blood pressure and diabetes had been less certain. Now a team of researchers have confirmed the connection following a trawl through more than four million patient records. The study does not show that high blood pressure causes diabetes, but the researchers said that conclusive evidence of the link between the two was a possible “game-changer” which could lead to better treatment. High blood pressure is often linked to obesity, which is one of the main risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Professor Kazem Rahimi, deputy director of the George Institute for Global Health, who led the research, said people with diabetes were also more likely to suffer from heart attacks, stroke and heart failure. “Confirming this connection reliably provides new hope for those people and new avenues for research,” he said. “Understanding the link will help us better communicate risks to patients and can provide another motivation for patients and doctors to aim for tight blood pressure control.” The study is published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. High blood pressure can be prevented by eating healthily, watching our weight, getting exercise, not drinking too much alcohol and not smoking. Rates of diabetes in the UK have soared by nearly 60 per cent in the past decade, according to the charity Diabetes UK and treating the condition and its many potential complications costs the NHS an estimated £10bn a year. The increase is thought to be a consequence of growing rates of overweight and ob Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Health Information If you have diabetes you should aim to keep your blood pressure well controlled. Having high blood pressure (hypertension) is one of several risk factors that can increase your chance of developing heart disease, a stroke and some other complications. Treatment includes a change in lifestyle risk factors where these can be improved. Many people with diabetes need to take medication to lower their blood pressure. What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the pressure of blood in your blood vessels (arteries). Blood pressure is measured in millimetres of mercury (mm Hg). Your blood pressure is recorded as two figures - for example, 124/80 mm Hg. This is said as 124 over 80. The top (first) number is the systolic pressure. This is the pressure in the arteries when the heart contracts. The bottom (second) number is the diastolic pressure. This is the pressure in the arteries when the heart rests between each heartbeat. What is high blood pressure? This is not as simple to answer as it may seem. In general, the higher the blood pressure, the greater the risk to health. Depending on various factors, the level at which blood pressure is said to be high (hypertension) can vary from person to person. The cut-off point for blood pressure that is said to be high is 140/80 mm Hg or above for people with diabetes and 130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes and complications (for example, kidney disease). These are lower than the cut-off point for people who do not have diabetes. Note: high blood pressure actually means that your blood pressure remains above the cut-off point each time it is taken. That is, your blood pressure is sustained at a level higher than it should be and is not just a one-off high reading when you happen to be stressed. High blood pressure can Continue reading >>

What Is High Blood Pressure?

What Is High Blood Pressure?

Blood pressure is the pressure of blood against the blood vessel walls as the heart pumps. When someone has high blood pressure (hypertension), the heart and arteries have a much heavier workload. The heart has to pump harder and the arteries are under greater strain as they carry blood. Having high blood pressure puts someone at a higher risk for stroke, heart attack, kidney failure, loss of vision, and atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). What Causes High Blood Pressure? The causes of high blood pressure in kids can differ, depending on a child's age. The younger the child, the more likely the high blood pressure is linked to an illness. In babies, it's usually caused by prematurity or problems with the kidneys (this is most common), lungs, or heart. These can include conditions like bronchopulmonary dysplasia (an immaturity of the lungs in premature babies) or coarctation of the aorta (a narrowing of part of the major blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart). While hypertension is far more common in adults, experts link childhood obesity to rising rates of childhood hypertension. In some cases it's due to a problem with the kidneys or other conditions. If no specific cause is found, doctors call it "essential hypertension." Some medicines (such as steroids or oral contraceptives) can lead to high blood pressure, as can using alcohol and illegal drugs. If it's not treated, high blood pressure can damage the heart, brain, kidneys, and eyes. But when hypertension is caught early, monitored, and treated, kids can lead an active, normal life. continue Continue reading >>

More Young Adults At Risk For High Blood Pressure

More Young Adults At Risk For High Blood Pressure

Nearly one in three adults—more than 65 million Americans—suffers from high blood pressure, also called hypertension. A growing number of young adults are now at risk for the disease. High blood pressure leads to more than half of all heart attacks, strokes, and heart failure cases in the United States. It also increases the risk of kidney failure, blindness, and other serious health consequences. High blood pressure is a silent killer, often with no obvious or visible symptoms. For African Americans, the disease tends to begin at an earlier age and be more severe than among whites, Asians, and Hispanics. Study shows 19 percent of young adults have high blood pressure. NIH-funded analysis indicates higher risk for young adults than previously believed. With more than 65 million Americans suffering from the effects of high blood pressure (HBP), it is critical to understand the basics in order to be able to better control the disease. This is even more urgent, since recent research shows that young adults have HBP in increasing numbers. The new study—which took blood pressure readings of more than 14,000 men and women between 24 and 32 years of age—revealed a higher percentage of high blood pressure readings than results from a previous major study, according to Steven Hirschfeld, Associate Director for Clinical Research for the NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The previous study (NHANES) reported high blood pressure in 4 percent of adults 20 to 39 years of age. “Investigations into the reasons underlying the reported differences between the [two studies] will no doubt yield additional insight into the measurement of high blood pressure in the young adult populations,” he says. The study authors w Continue reading >>

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