diabetestalk.net

Do Oranges Cause High Blood Sugar?

Does Eating Oranges And Tangerines Raise Your Blood Sugar And If So Should They Be Avoided?

Does Eating Oranges And Tangerines Raise Your Blood Sugar And If So Should They Be Avoided?

A: Oranges and tangerines contain carbohydrate, as do all types of fruit. All foods that contain carbohydrate can raise blood glucose, but this does not mean that you shouldn’t eat them, as carbohydrate is an important energy source for the body. The key is controlling the amount of carbohydrate that you eat at each of your meals and snacks. One small orange (about the size of a tennis ball) contains 15 grams of carbohydrate, as do two small tangerines. You can certainly include either of these fruits in your eating plan (and they’re a rich source of many vitamins, minerals and fiber), but you’ll need to count them as one of your carbohydrate choices or servings. If you’re uncertain as to how much carbohydrate you should be eating at your meals and snacks, I’d recommend that you meet with a dietitian who can give you more guidance. In general, however, men need at least 60 to 75 grams of carb per meal and women need 45 to 60 grams of carb per meal. Snacks, if you eat them, are typically 15 to 30 grams of carb. Continue reading >>

Fruits That Raise Blood Sugar

Fruits That Raise Blood Sugar

Your body transforms the food you eat into fuel that helps it run smoothly. Its preferred fuel is glucose, a type of sugar that comes primarily from carbohydrates. Over time, too much sugar in the diet can trigger health problems, so it’s best to limit your sugar to natural sources like fruits, which also provide vitamin C and a wealth of other nutrients. Some fruits can raise blood sugar very quickly, however, and others have a more gradual effect. Processed foods with lots of added sugars – sodas, candy, desserts and baked goods – have the most immediate impact on your blood sugar levels. But even on what seems like a healthy diet, some of your food and beverage choices may negatively affect your blood sugar levels, causing them to peak and crash. When this happens, you might feel a brief burst of energy – a sugar rush – followed by a low point where you become tired and need to refuel. Keeping blood sugar levels on an even keel is key to overall good health, even if you aren’t diabetic or prediabetic. A balanced diet of regular meals that include some protein, carbs and fat helps you stay on track and avoid blood sugar levels that swing between being too high and too low. Dried Fruits Packed with minerals like iron and health-promoting phytonutrients, dried fruits are a smart addition to your diet. Because all the water is removed from them though, these fruits are concentrated bites of natural sugar. Pay attention to portion size when choosing dried fruits. A small box of raisins (1 ounce) looks like a modest serving that's super-convenient to bring with you to work, but it contains 20 grams of sugar. Apricots, currants and pineapple are other commonly dried fruits that may elevate your blood sugar. Another issue with dried fruits is that manufacturers m Continue reading >>

Don't Be Afraid Of Fruit

Don't Be Afraid Of Fruit

Don't Be Afraid of Fruit by Berkeley Wellness | July 01, 2011 Eat more fruits and vegetables—who could argue with that simple advice? Well, amazingly enough, the fruit part is being questioned, mostly by advocates of low-carb diets, such as science writer Gary Taubes and lifestyle guru Tim Ferriss. Some warn that fruit is almost as “evil” as sugar and white bread when it comes to weight control and overall health. Fruit: guilt by association What scares some people about fruit is that not only do nearly all of its calories come from carbs, but most of those carbs are sugar, and much of that sugar is fructose. Say fructose and most people think high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)—our No. 1 sweetener, added to so many soft drinks and processed foods. HFCS is slightly more than half fructose; plain old table sugar (sucrose) is also half fructose, while honey is about 40 percent fructose. Some recent research suggests that fructose, at least in the large quantities many Americans are now consuming, can have adverse effects on blood cholesterol and triglycerides, worsen blood sugar control, promote abdominal weight gain and pose other health risks. But fresh fruits supply only a small fraction of the fructose Americans consume. You would have to eat several servings of fruit to get as much fructose as in a can of soda. Moreover, fruits are complicated foods, not just a serving of fructose. Their fiber and other components help slow the absorption of fructose, compared to sugary beverages. Some fruits, such as apples, pears and mangoes, are higher in fructose and other sugars and thus calories, but they’re still only moderate sources. Some are relatively high on the glycemic index (a measure of the effect of carbohydrates on blood sugar), but most are moderate. It’s h Continue reading >>

Foods And Drinks That Can Cause Blood Sugar Swings

Foods And Drinks That Can Cause Blood Sugar Swings

Just when you think you're making all the right food choices, your blood sugar takes a leap or dive. Foods and drinks can have an impact you might not expect, and these surprise blood-sugar changes can be harmful (potentially causing low or high levels). Here are some things you should consider: Don't let bagels betray you. Counting carbs is a way of life when you have diabetes. Bread can really rack up those carbs, but not all bread is created equal. Think there's no difference between a bagel and an English muffin? One plain English muffin has 140 calories and 27 grams of carbohydrates. A bagel that's 4½ inches in diameter serves up 294 calories and 58 grams of carbs. That's about as many calories and even more carbs than a glazed donut. "It's about portion size. Some bagels are the size of a plate," says Pamela Allweiss, MD, MPH. She's a medical officer in the division of diabetes translation at the CDC. A fruit in any other form may be twice as sweet. All fruits have sugar, but did you know that different forms of the same fruit have vastly different amounts? Dried fruit packs a sugary punch compared with its fresh counterpart. Ten grapes, which weigh about 1.75 ounces, have 34 calories and 8 grams of sugar. They're also full of water, which helps fill you up. A 1.5-ounce, single-serving box of raisins packs 129 calories and 15 grams of sugar, but none of the water. "Without the water, the sugar is more concentrated in dried fruit. And with the smaller size, you're likely to eat many more of them," Allweiss says. Fruit juices are similarly deceptive. A 5-ounce Florida orange has 65 calories, 13 grams of sugar, and 3 grams of fiber. An 8-ounce glass of juice, though, has 112 calories, 24 grams of sugar, and no fiber. Sports drinks may not be so sporty. They may have Continue reading >>

Oranges And Grapes: More On Insulin And Glucose After Fruit Or Juice

Oranges And Grapes: More On Insulin And Glucose After Fruit Or Juice

The effects of eating whole fruit or drinking fruit juice on blood glucose and insulin appears to be of some interest to people. As my last post on a study comparing apples, smoothies, and juice garnered some attention, I thought I would follow this up by looking a later study by the same researchers: “The role of dietary fiber in satiety, glucose, and insulin: studies with fruit and fruit juice“. This study expanded on the previous research on apples by comparing the effects of both oranges and grapes on blood glucose and insulin as either whole fruit or juice. Oranges South African Navel oranges were used for both the fruit and the juice. As the oranges had a lower amounts of sugar than the apples, the total sugar in each test meal was reduced to 50 grams, to avoid over-stuffing their volunteers with fruit. Even so, it took over 600 grams of peeled oranges to reach 50 gram dose of sugar. The equivalent 600 ml of orange juice was produced by hand using an orange reamer (some task!) and the fibre removed using a pectinase enzyme. As in the previous study, both test meals were fed to ten volunteers, on separate occasions, and after being fasted overnight. Glucose There wasn’t any difference in the spike in blood sugar after eating oranges or drinking the orange juice. While blood sugar dipped below fasting levels for both fruit and juice, it returned to normal rapidly after eating the oranges but the reactive hypoglycemia persisted to the end of the experiment after drinking juice. Insulin Insulin increased significantly more after drinking orange juice than after eating the oranges. The total insulin produced, calculated as the area under the curve, was also quite a bit larger after drinking the juice. Both the blood glucose spike and the insulin response were qui Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Not all healthy foods are created equal. Greens may be good for you, but the nutrients in iceberg lettuce may not be as plentiful as those in kale, spinach, and Swiss chard. Besides nutrient content, the glycemic index (GI) of a food may also help you make healthy choices. The GI measures how quickly a food will raise blood sugar. Low GI foods have a score of 55 or less, while high GI foods have a score of 70 or more. In general, lower GI foods are a better choice for people with diabetes. Foods that are both nutritious and have a low GI are helpful in managing health and blood glucose levels. Here are 10 superfoods that are especially good for those with diabetes. 1. Non-Starchy Vegetables Non-starchy vegetables have fewer carbs per serving. They include everything from artichokes and asparagus to broccoli and beets. This category of veggies goes a long way in satisfying your hunger and boosting your intake of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. These vegetables are also low in calories and carbohydrates, making them some of the few foods that people with diabetes can enjoy almost with abandon. In fact, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) identifies most non-starchy vegetables as low GI foods with a ranking of 55 or less. A small study of 11 people found that a low-calorie diet consisting of non-starchy vegetables may successfully reverse type 2 diabetes. 2. Non-Fat or Low-Fat Plain Milk and Yogurt Vitamin D is essential for good health. One of its roles is to keep bones healthy, yet many of us don’t get as much as we need. Non-fat dairy foods, including milk and yogurt, are fortified with vitamin D. These dairy products are smart choices for diabetics because they have low GI scores: Skim milk has a GI score of 32 while reduced fat yogurt has a GI sco Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes: 6 Fruits To Help Control Your Blood Sugar

Type Ii Diabetes: 6 Fruits To Help Control Your Blood Sugar

Type II Diabetes: 6 Fruits to Help Control Your Blood Sugar Controlling your diabetes could be as easy as losing weight. There are many things that you can do to control you blood sugar and increasing your intake of certain fruits is one of them. Natural sugar is easier to break down than processed or man-made sugar. This is why adding fruit, a great source for natural sugar, to your diet in moderation could prevent your body from building an insulin intolerance. Here are our favorite fruits to add to your diet if you are looking to naturally control your blood sugar, or decrease the amount of insulin that you use each day. 1. Avocado Avocado is thought by many to be a vegetable. On the contrary, it is actually a fruit. This fruit is high in monounsaturated fats which are one of the healthy fats that you should ingest on a regular basis. These fruits also improve heart health. They have a very low percentage of low-quality carbohydrates and can improve the sensitivity you have to your insulin. This means that simply snacking on avocado, eating guacamole, or adding it to a sandwich could decrease the amount of insulin that you have to take. 2. Grapefruits Grapefruits are a great source of chromium. Recent studies have shown chromium to significantly lower blood sugar levels. A grapefruit with breakfast can help break down the dietary sugars that are in your cereal as well. It also contains a very low amount of carbohydrates but most of these carbohydrates are considered healthy fiber so they won’t cause a serious increase in blood sugar. 3. Pineapples Pineapple does not prevent blood sugar spikes. However, it has a low glycemic index, which means that it raises your blood sugar slower and does not cause rapid spikes. This means that when your blood sugar starts low, it Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetes Diet Include Fruit?

Can A Diabetes Diet Include Fruit?

Although fruit contains sugar, it's also loaded with essential vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Learn how fruit can be part of a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. Most people with type 2 diabetes know they can't indulge in a piece of chocolate cake or sip sugar-laden drinks every day. But is all sugar off limits in a type 2 diabetes diet even the natural sugar found in fruits? "For most people with diabetes,eating fruit is fine," says dietitian Nora Saul, RD , a certified diabetes educator at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Fruit is a healthy snack, packed with the fiber, vitamins, and nutrients essential for good health. But that doesn't mean people with type 2 diabetes can eat all the fruit they want. "Every single fruit has carbohydrates, which means it will impact your blood sugar levels ," says Lorena Drago , a certified diabetes educator and spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Read on to learn how you can enjoy natures candy while keeping your blood sugar levels in check. Fruit is an important part of a healthy diabetes-friendly diet. But because its a source of carbohydrates, you need to pay attention to each fruits glycemic index ranking and appropriate serving size. The glycemic index (GI)is a numerical rating assigned to carbohydrate foods that indicates how much a food will affect blood sugar levels. Ounce for ounce, low GI foods raise blood sugar levels less than higher GI foods, says Saul. So to keep your blood sugar levels stable the goal for everyone with diabetes its important to reach for low GI foods. Of course, portion size is also very important since the more of a carbohydrate-containing food you eat, the more it impacts your blood sugar levels. If you're looking for the most nutritional bang for your carbohydrate buck, Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

Can Oranges Raise Blood Sugar?

Can Oranges Raise Blood Sugar?

Whether you have diabetes or watch your blood sugars to maintain more stable energy levels, you know that some foods can raise your blood sugars more than others. Protein in meat, poultry and fish and fats found in oils and butter have little influence over your blood sugars. However, your consumption of carbohydrate-rich foods influences how high your blood sugars rise after you eat. The extent to which your blood sugars rise after eating oranges depends on the amount you have at one time, the size of the orange and its processing. Video of the Day The main factor that influences your blood sugar levels is the amount of carbohydrates you eat. Carbohydrates include the starches found in bread, potatoes and pasta as well as sugars found in sweets and desserts. Other types of sugars, such as lactose found in dairy products and glucose and fructose found in fruits, can also influence your blood sugar levels. Oranges, like other fruits, contain sugars that can raise your blood sugar levels. The available carbohydrate content of your oranges will tell you how high it can raise your blood sugars. You can calculate available carbs by subtracting their fiber content from their total carbs because, unlike other types of carbohydrates, fiber does not raise your blood sugar levels. For example, a small orange containing 11.3 grams of total carbs and 2.3 grams of fiber has an available carb content of 9 grams, while a large orange, with 21.6 grams of total carbs and 4.4 grams of fiber, has an available carb content of 17.2 grams of available carbs. As a comparison basis, a slice of bread has 15 grams of available carbs. The larger the orange you eat, the higher your blood sugars will rise. A glass of 1 cup of fresh orange juice has 25.8 grams of total carbs and 0.5 grams of fiber, Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Oranges are a healthy citrus fruit, but if you have type 2 diabetes, you may worry about their high sugar content if your blood sugar levels are out of control. Fortunately, oranges contain components that make them a nutritious part of a diabetic diet as long as you eat them in concert with other healthy foods. Video of the Day People with type 2 diabetes cannot properly modulate blood sugar levels because they either don't produce enough insulin or their bodies can't effectively use the insulin they do produce. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, making up between 90 to 95 percent of all diabetics, according to FamilyDoctor.org. The food that a type 2 diabetic eats can significantly affect blood glucose levels, so choosing the right foods is important. Fruit in a Diabetic Diet Fruit can and should be part of a diabetic's daily diet. Diabetics who eat between 1,600 and 2,000 calories per day need to eat at least three servings of fruit per day. Those consuming 1,200 to 1,600 calories need two fruit servings daily, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. The fiber, vitamins and minerals in fruit are essential to maintaining overall health. Because fruits provide carbohydrates, you usually need to pair them with a protein or fat. Oranges provide high levels of fiber, which is important for digestive health, and vitamin C, which supports the immune system. The carbohydrate count in one orange is about 10 to 15 g. For diabetics using a carbohydrate-counting system to determine how much they can eat in a day, an orange is one serving. For diabetics using the glycemic index or glycemic load of foods to plan what they eat, oranges are also a good choice. The glycemic load of an orange is about 5, a low number that indicates the fruit causes only a s Continue reading >>

Oranges.....good Or Bad ?

Oranges.....good Or Bad ?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi, I have taken to eating oranges again, after not eating them for years, after I had gout and doctor advised giving them a miss......are oranges good or bad for someone with type 2, controlled with metformin ?.........Del. Oranges are tropical fruits which are very high in sugar, the only way to see if you are tolerating them is to test your bs before and after eating one which is what I myself am about to do. I can't resist them & they are at their best just now. Beware: oranges bananas, pineapple, grapes magoes, peaches necterines plums etc I don't currentley test myself........what is the best way to do that ? I don't currentley test myself........what is the best way to do that ? Well, first you will need a meter. The most popular one that people here use seems to be the SD Codefree which is available from Home Health online, delivery is free and arrives within a few days. For around 12.99 you get a meter, about five test strips and lancets, (so best to also order strips 6.99 and lancets 5 lancets last ages as you can multiuse. ) all three items come in a zipped case and homehealth is the cheapest retailer. When you test you are aiming to keep your bs between 4.5 & 8.5 You will learn which foods affect your levels then you can adjust your diet accordingly O.k, Thanks for that, I have never self tested.......I did mention it to diabetic nurse once, but she seemed to brush it off, as though I didn't need to do it very often, and said that was why I went to see her.........but I only go once a year.......when I was in hospital they tested 3 times a day........Del. Not testing is a myth because the health service originally from government to save m Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

More in diabetes