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Do Nuts Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Diabetes Food Chart 3

Diabetes Food Chart 3

What is the key to successfully managing diabetes? The foods we consume are THE most important factor. A truly diabetes friendly, Diabetes Food Chart designed to help diabetics obtain and maintain truly normal blood sugars is crucial to your success. a truly diabetes friendly food chart foods you can eat daily foods to avoid The diabetes food chart below is unlike most, it has been tested and it has been proven to help diabetics. If you will follow this diabetes food chart it will help you reduce blood sugars. Most other diabetes food charts are high carb, grain based charts that promote elevated blood sugars and ever-increasing drug requirements. They were designed and promoted by the Medical Industry, Big Food and Big Pharma. These are the same groups and companies that profit from diabetes. Truly Diabetes Friendly In 2009 I was an obese, chronically sick, newly diagnosed diabetic. Using the diabetes food chart on this page, I successfully manage my blood sugars. This food chart can help you too. How do I know? It helps everyone who tries it. Every one. This food chart is truly diabetes friendly, not Big Food, Big Pharma and Medical Industry friendly. Diabetes Friendly Food Chart Let’s look at the diabetes food chart above, level by level. Note: The base of the chart or pyramid is wider, these are the foods you need to eat the most. As you move up the chart, those are foods you can eat less. The Base – MEATS! All meats are ok to eat including fish, beef, pork and poultry. Fatty meats are even better. Fatty meats are the cornerstone of my personal diabetes meal plan and are the base of this diabetes food chart. If I do eat lean cuts, I usually add butter to increase the fat content.Limit processed deli meats. Always check ingredient lists to avoid eating fillers th Continue reading >>

Need To Lower Your Blood Pressure? Eating A Handful Of These Could Have An Amazing Effect

Need To Lower Your Blood Pressure? Eating A Handful Of These Could Have An Amazing Effect

The nuts contain high levels of magnesium and potassium - which are essential elements in the human body. Magnesium helps keep heart rhythm steady, is vital for healthy bones and teeth, muscle function, the nervous system and keeps bowels healthy. The substance can also control blood sugar to combat insulin resistance which can lead to type 2 diabetes. But experts have since revealed there is a link between the amount of magnesium people eat and their blood pressure. Researchers at Indiana University have previously found people receiving an average of 368mg day for an average of three months had overall reductions in systolic blood pressure of 2mm of mercury (mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure of 1.78 mm Hg. The study found taking 300mg/a day for just one month was enough to reduce blood pressure and increase blood flow. Cassandra Barns, nutritionist, spoke to Express.co.uk about the findings. She said: “Cashew nuts are a fantastic source of magnesium. “Magnesium may help to keep blood pressure in balance, potentially by helping to relax the blood vessel walls and allow them to dilate.” The NHS recommends men should have 300mg of magnesium a day - while women only need 270mg. A handful of cashew nuts - or 100g - contain 292mg of magnesium. High blood pressure can cause damage the arteries, which carry blood away from the heart, by damaging the cells of their lining. This can cause a hardening of the arteries called arteriosclerosis which can block blood flow to the heart, kidneys and brain. Hypotension can also lead to aneurysms, which can rupture and cause life-threatening internal bleeding. It can also lead to coronary artery disease and increase the risk of kidney damage and TIAs - or ministrokes. Thu, August 18, 2016 Here are 16 of the best superfoods foods Continue reading >>

Does Groundnut Increase Blood Sugar Level?

Does Groundnut Increase Blood Sugar Level?

It will not increase your blood sugar level if you will eat a small serving of groundnuts but a large serving could increase you blood sugar levels Ground nuts have a glycemic index of 14 making them a low GI food Glycemic index is a point scale used to compare how high your blood sugar and insulin spike after eating the same amount of carbohydrates from different foods. Foods that are digested more slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. The GI content of foods is measured on a 100-point scale, with 100 being the highest GI foods. Continue reading >>

Thirteen Foods That Won't Raise Blood Glucose

Thirteen Foods That Won't Raise Blood Glucose

By Christine Case-Lo and Ana Gotter Article last reviewed by Wed 8 March 2017. Visit our Nutrition / Diet category page for the latest news on this subject, or sign up to our newsletter to receive the latest updates on Nutrition / Diet. All references are available in the References tab. Continue reading >>

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Disease Prevention Glycemic index is a point scale used to compare how high your blood sugar and insulin spike after eating the same amount of carbohydrates from different foods. Foods that are digested more slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. The GI content of foods is measured on a 100-point scale, with 100 being the highest GI foods. Peanuts have a GI of 14 making them a low GI food (Jenkins, 1981). Glycemic load also measures blood sugar spikes, but uses the typical serving size of each food item instead of a standard carbohydrate amount, making it an even better tool to show how different foods eaten can affect blood sugar (Salmeron, 1997). Foods with a higher GI and GL can cause blood sugar and insulin to spike soon after eating, followed by a drop in blood sugar to levels lower than before consumption. This crash in blood sugar can make a person feel tired and hungry for more food, and the rollercoaster cycle of highs and lows can contribute to the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes (Jenkins, 1981). In addition, low-GI diets can significantly improve long-term glucose control in people with diabetes, similar to the amounts achieved with medication (Ajala, 2013). Peanuts and peanut butter are both low GI and GL foods, due to their content of healthy oils, protein, and fiber that have a positive effect on blood sugar control. Research has shown that peanuts can help control blood sugar in both healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes (Kirkmeyer, 2000 and Jenkins, 2011). Peanuts and peanut butter have even been shown to help lessen the spike in blood sugar when paired with high carbohydrate or high GL foods (Johnston, 2005). Snacking on peanuts can help to maintain blood sugar in between meals. One study showed t Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Diabetes 101: Why You Need To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes 101: Why You Need To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes is a growing problem that can't be ignored. Currently, 1 in 10 Americans have type 2 diabetes. However, if new cases develop as projected, its prevalence could double or even triple over the next 40 years, according to Ann Albright, director of the Division of Diabetes Translation at the CDC. The rates are predicted to skyrocket by the year 2050. By that time, 1 in every 3 Americans will be diabetic unless we make drastic cultural changes. Diabetes affects approximately 29.1 million people of all ages in America, or about 9.3 percent of the population. Add to that about 86 million people in the United States with pre-diabetes, which is a stage of insulin resistance that develops before full-blown diabetes. If there’s no intervention, those with pre-diabetes will have diabetes in three to six years. What is Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the immune system, for unknown reasons, destroys the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. When the body can't produce insulin, this is type 1 diabetes. Some new evidence from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the DIABIMMUNE Study Group suggests that type 1 diabetes may be related to changes in the body’s microbiome, which is the collection of bacteria and other microbes that live in and on the body, especially in the digestive tract. Type 1 diabetes is not caused by poor diet or lifestyle factors. Type 2 diabetes is primarily caused by a poor diet and lack of exercise, which lead to insulin resistance, the cells’ inability to recognize the availability of insulin that they can use for energy. An unhealthy lifestyle may also create an environment in which the pancreas doesn't make enough insulin. Many type 2 diabetics have both insulin r Continue reading >>

3 Snacks Type 2 Diabetics Need To Keep With Them At All Times!

3 Snacks Type 2 Diabetics Need To Keep With Them At All Times!

No blood sugar impact snacks Most type 2 diabetics struggle with controlling their blood sugar. Since almost all foods seem to raise their blood sugar, they also tend to stress out over what kind of snacks they can eat. But since they also get hungry, this is a problem. So…what to eat? Listed below are three different snacks you should have on “your person” at all times. Under most circumstances, they have a zero to minimal impact on your blood sugar, which means you should be able to eat them without worry (at least regarding your blood sugar). Nuts Nuts are high in fat, good fiber, vitamins and minerals. While they vary slightly – from one variety to another – in nutrient content, they are all high in fat, which means they will have minimal impact on your blood sugar. Additionally, the fat, vitamin and mineral content will help keep you full (or sated) until your next meal. They are pretty hardy and travel well, making them an excellent snack choice for just about anyone, but type 2 diabetics in particular. Eat them raw (our preference) or roasted. Just don’t eat them loaded with sugar or syrup or covered in chocolate (but you already knew that). And if you happen to be allergic to nuts, seeds are good too. Pumpkin and sunflower seeds do essentially the same things! Beef Jerky Another snack high in protein and fat – the combination you need to keep your blood sugar from spiking. Our preference: Buy it from a meat market or butcher shop (or make it yourself) so you know that it has been minimally processed. Another tip: If you buy from the store, check the label and look at the sugar content. Many types of beef jerky sold at the store have a lot of added sugar. Try to keep it below 5 grams of sugar per serving. Best bet: Sugar free beef jerky. A Boiled Eg Continue reading >>

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

Can controlling your blood sugar and preventing diabetes complications be as simple as eating the right foods? Yes. Certain foods are packed with nutrients that stabilize blood sugar levels, protect your heart, and even save your vision from the damaging effects of diabetes. These 12 foods can give you an extra edge against diabetes and its complications. 1. Apples In a Finnish study, men who ate the most apples and other foods high in quercetin had 20 percent less diabetes and heart disease deaths. Other good sources of quercetin are onions, tomatoes, leafy green vegetables, and berries. 2. Cinnamon A study at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, found that if you use ½ teaspoon of cinnamon daily, it can make cells more sensitive to insulin. Therefore, the study says, the cells convert blood sugar to energy. After 40 days of taking various amount of cinnamon extract, diabetics experienced not only lower blood sugar spikes after eating, but major improvements in signs of heart health. And you can sprinkle cinnamon on just about anything. 3. Citrus Fruit Studies show that people with diabetes tend to have lower levels of vitamin C in their bodies, so antioxidant-packed citrus fruit is a great snack choice. It may seem quicker to get your C from a pill, but since fruit is low in fat, high in fiber, and delivers lots of other healthy nutrients, it's a better choice. 4. Cold-Water Fish Heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as often as it does people without the illness, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diets high in omega-3 fatty acids—the "good fat" in cold-water fish such as wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, and Atlantic mackerel—can help lower artery-clogging LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while raising levels of HDL Continue reading >>

Board Of Directors | American Pistachio Growers

Board Of Directors | American Pistachio Growers

Back row, from left to right: James Nichols, Nichols Farms, Hanford, California; Jim Zion, Meridian Growers, Clovis, California; Rudy Hernandez, Treasurer/Secretary, Five Star Harvesting, San Luis Obispo, California; Alison Nagatani, C. Nagatani Farms, Earlimart, California; Brian Watte, Vice Chair, George Watte & Sons, Tulare, California; Sharon Roden, Chair, Roden Farms, Paso Robles, California; Richard Searle, Searle Ranch, Pearce, Arizona; Adam Kusmak, Tularosa Pistachio Groves, Tularosa, New Mexico; Steve Burcham, Gage Farms, Firebaugh, California. Front row, from left to right: Richard Sandrini, R.B. Sandrini Farms, Delano, California; Adam Orandi, Adam Orandi Orchards, Terra Bella, California; Jeremy Blackwell, Executive Committee, 2B Farming, Inc., Visalia, California; Anil K. Gupta, K&G Farms, Tulare, California; Beth Sells, Keenan Farming Company, Avenal, California; Dominic Pitigliano, Executive Committee, Pitigliano Farms, Tipton, CA; Justin Wylie, Wylie Farms, Fresno, California. Not shown: Kristi Robinson, Kristine Robinson Revocable Trust, Clovis, California; Gary Smith, Executive Committee, Eriksson LLC, Visalia, California Continue reading >>

6 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

6 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

A healthy lifestyle of exercise with a well-balanced diet should go a long way towards keeping blood sugar levels even. For example, for maintaining good blood sugar levels, my doctor recommends a diet rich in healthy protein and fats, lower in carbohydrates, and plenty of low-carb produce. But beyond the general principles, there are some wonderful foods that specifically help keep blood sugar levels in a healthy place. Here are six of them. Tea: Animal studies have shown that black, green, white and oolong teas all help with blood sugar control. One study found that after drinking six cups of tea a day for eight weeks, patient’s blood sugar levels were 15-20 percent lower than before! Drinking tea is a beautiful and traditional practice that could also have a positive role in healthy blood sugar levels. Dark chocolate: One important aspect of good blood sugar control is how your body handles insulin. Dark chocolate was found to reduce insulin resistance, a vital part of keeping healthy blood sugar levels. This is good news for chocolate lovers — just make sure that it is a truly dark chocolate. Vinegar: In a surprising study at Arizona State University, vinegar was shown to have the same effect as a leading diabetes medication! In the study, patients were given a vinegar drink to consume before a meal rich in carbohydrates. Starting a meal with a salad with a vinegar dressing could be a good choice instead. Nuts: When diabetic patients swapped carbohydrate-rich snacks with nuts instead, they were able to lower their general blood sugar levels over time. Nuts are a healthy source of protein, as well as many nutrients (such as vitamin E and selenium), so they are a smart addition to a healthy lifestyle. Chia seeds: This tiny seed is native to Southern Mexico and Cen Continue reading >>

7 Health Benefits Of Macadamia Nuts

7 Health Benefits Of Macadamia Nuts

Macadamia nuts are an internationally popular delicacy grown in the tropical climates of Australia, Brazil, Indonesia, New Zealand, and South Africa. Hawai’i plants macadamia trees extensively as a harvest crop. With more than seven varieties, including the popular Macadamia integrifolia and Macadamia tetraphylla, this delicious nut is packed with nutrition. Here are the seven health benefits of macadamia nuts. 1. Macadamia nuts could be good for your heart. Researchers from Pennsylvania State University published a study in the Journal of Nutritionto investigate the health effects of macadamia nuts on the heart. Twenty-five men and women with mild hypercholesterolemia, or high blood cholesterol levels, participated in the study. The researchers assigned the participants into one of the two experimental diets during the first 5-week period and then switched diets for the next 5-week period, which was separated by an approximate 2-week agreed on break, during which the participants ate their usual diet. The participants in macadamia nut-rich group (MAC) ate approximately 1.5 ounces of macadamia nuts per day based on the FDA Qualified Health Claim. The average American diet (AAD) group ate a typical American diet modeled from the Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals and NHANES database. The diets matched in total fat, protein, and carbohydrate profile. Results showed that the inclusion of macadamia nuts to your diet could lower your total cholesterol and low-density cholesterol (LDL) levels, also known as “bad” cholesterol. Having too high levels of LDL can lead to plaque buildup in your arteries, leading to heart disease or stroke. 2. Macadamia nuts can help improve the blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes. Published in the journal PLOS On Continue reading >>

Peanut Butter At Breakfast Helps Control Hunger And Blood Sugar All Day

Peanut Butter At Breakfast Helps Control Hunger And Blood Sugar All Day

Consuming peanut butter or peanuts for breakfast can control blood sugar throughout most of the day, even after eating a high carbohydrate lunch… In addition to this “Second Meal Effect,” peanuts and peanut butter caused a significant reduction in the desire to eat for up to 12 hours and a significant increase in the secretion of the hormone PYY that promotes satiety and feelings of fullness. The study, “Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycemic response and appetite in obese women with type 2 diabetes risk: a randomized cross-over clinical trial,” was conducted jointly by Purdue University and the Federal University of Vicosa in Brazil. The principal investigator, Dr. Richard Mattes of Purdue University explained, “If you include peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast, you not only diminish the rise in blood sugar at breakfast but also again after lunch, helping to reduce blood sugar over a very large portion of the day.” During three phases of the study, 1.5 ounces of peanuts, 3 tablespoons of peanut butter, or no peanuts or peanut butter were consumed with a breakfast consisting of orange juice and cream of wheat followed by a lunch consisting of white bread and strawberry jam. Blood samples and appetite ratings were taken over a series of three hours following breakfast and again after lunch to assess glucose control and satiety; participants were also asked to keep a food diary for the remainder of the day after leaving the testing site. Results showed that peanut butter or peanuts included with breakfast promotes secretion of the appetite-suppressing hormone peptide YY (PYY). In addition, participants who consumed peanut butter or peanuts with breakfast reported a lower desire to eat for up to 8 to 12 hours later and maintained lower blood Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

10 Nutrition Tips For Managing Cancer And Diabetes

10 Nutrition Tips For Managing Cancer And Diabetes

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, and of the more than 13 million Americans who have or have had cancer, eight to 18 percent also have diabetes. It’s an eye-opening statistic and a reminder about why it’s important to be proactive about our overall health and well-being during and after cancer treatment. “Because of the huge link between insulin resistance and cancer, it is critically important for people who have diabetes to manage their blood glucose during cancer treatment,” adds Brooke McIntyre, a clinical oncology dietitian and diabetes program coordinator at CTCA in Tulsa. McIntyre recommends the following tips to help manage cancer and diabetes: Never eat a “naked” carbohydrate. Funny statement, but people remember it! Rather than eating only an apple, eat a handful of nuts or one to two tablespoons of nut butter too. This helps decrease the rise in blood sugar and makes you feel more satisfied. Eat fewer carbohydrates. Decreasing carbohydrate intake not only lowers blood sugar, but can also help lower blood pressure. Eat more veggies, fruits and whole grains. Eating cancer-fighting foods high in fiber can help regulate blood sugar. Foods to add to your diet include: Asian pears, raspberries, blackberries, bananas, blueberries, beans, broccoli, spinach, lentils, peas, corn, flax seeds and whole-grain breads or crackers. Exercise regularly. The American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Diabetes Association recommend 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week to lower risk of cancer recurrence. Add healthy fats to your diet. Say “no” to doughnuts and fried chicken and “hello” to healthy fats such as avocado, salmon and walnuts. Good fats contain antioxidants, help you maintain a steady blood sugar level and feel Continue reading >>

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