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Do Mangoes Lower Blood Sugar?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Are Mangoes Safe For Diabetics Or Will They Cause A Sugar Spike?

Are Mangoes Safe For Diabetics Or Will They Cause A Sugar Spike?

Although we all dread the heat, the one thing that makes us look forward to summer is the mango season. Their incredibly sweet tasteand delightful flavor makes them rival the perennial dessert favorites of chocolate and ice cream. Like every other fruit, mangoes are also a good source of essential nutrients likeVitamins C, A, E, K, fiber, calcium, potassium and copper. However, they are also high in sugar, which is why many believe that the fruit should be kept out of reach for diabetics. Although mangoes have high sugar content, mangiferin in mangoes helps lower blood sugar levels Though it may be true that mangoes have a high amount of sugars , its not all that bad, as they are not only packed with essential Vitamins, but with Mangiferin too, which in addition to being an anti-inflammatory and anti-viral, can also help lower blood sugar levels! In a research on Type-2 Diabetes , the glycemic response to a number of fruits was tested the fruits included bananas, oranges, pineapples, papayas and mango. The portions were standardized so that everyone had 50 grams of carbohydrate per serving. Mango showed the least rise in post-meal blood sugar levels, while oranges and papayas were the next best fruits. Mangoes are packed with Vitamins C and A. In addition, they also provide you with Vitamins K, E, and many from B complex. These vitamins are absolutely essential in your everyday diet for healthy bodily functions and to counter other health complications that can arise as a result of diabetes. Mangoes also contain some Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids, though overall, are very low in fat. Mangoes may have a low glycemic load of 51, but excessive intake will still raise your blood sugar levels, so avoid overeating As much as you love mangoes, and as healthy as they might b Continue reading >>

Stop Fighting Blood Sugar, Start Fixing Insulin Resistance

Stop Fighting Blood Sugar, Start Fixing Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is the underlying condition that is present in all forms of diabetes. Most people believe that insulin resistance is only present in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, however ample research shows that insulin resistance is also present in type 1 diabetes (1-3). It is a common misconception that people with type 1 diabetes do not experience insulin resistance. Even many doctors believe that insulin resistance only affects people with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and that by nature of being “skinny” or “normoweight,” people with type 1 diabetes are insulin sensitive. This information cannot be farther from the truth. In my practice, more than 95% of my clients with type 1 diabetes are insulin resistant, and 100% of my clients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant. If you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, you probably have picked up on the fact that I’m a huge fan of maximizing insulin effectiveness over managing blood glucose. The reason for this is actually quite simple: Trying to control blood glucose without addressing insulin resistance is akin to frequently washing your car and never fixing problems under the hood. Addressing the root cause of blood glucose variability – insulin resistance – is the most successful method of controlling blood glucose. Period. The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster Perhaps you’ve been in this situation before: you wake up in the morning, your blood glucose is 50 points over the normal range. You don’t know why. You eat a standard breakfast, bolus the same amount of insulin that you always give yourself for breakfast, and then continue on with your day. Two hours later, when you check your blood glucose, and it is still high. This time it is 150 points above the norma Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Ex-Diabetic Sidebar: When I was diabetic, my doctors and the hospital's dietitian told me that I would have to avoid fruits. I found that kind of strange, especially, since some of my hospital meals included applesauce, tangerine slices and orange juice! Avoiding fruits was difficult for me because I had a "sweet tooth" -- a strong craving for sweets. Being diabetic, my body craved sugar and I loved sweets -- not just fruits -- I loved apple pie, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, and ice cream. During my research, I discovered how to stop the cravings (see below). I also learned that eating some whole fruit can be beneficial, despite the sugar content in most fruits. Why? Because it's better to eat an apple than some cookies or ice cream to satisfy your craving for something sweet! :-) In addition, studies have shown that the nutrients within most fruits (e.g. antioxidants, Vitamin C, fiber, water) can help prevent and reverse the damage to blood vessels and body tissues caused by Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other similar diseases. The key is to make sure that you follow an effective reverse diabetes nutritional program such as the one defined in the "Death to Diabetes" 10-Step Reverse Diabetes Wellness Program. Most whole fruits are on the moderate to low end of the Glycemic Index (GI), making them a pretty good choice for most people with diabetes. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as water,fiber and antioxidants (flavonoids) such as catechin, quercetin, and anthocyanidin. Top 10 Fruits | Reverse Diabetes The following is a list of the top 10 fruits that most diabetics can eat because, for most diabetics, these fruits don't cause large or sustained blood glucose spikes. As a result, eating these fruits can help to satisfy your sweet to Continue reading >>

10 Foods To Lower Blood Sugar

10 Foods To Lower Blood Sugar

For most of us, balancing our blood sugar level is something we take for granted, or at least don’t think about too much on a daily basis, but then again, most of us don’t know what our blood sugar level is either. However, for many people, dealing with blood sugar levels is part of a daily routine and for some even a matter of life or death. In fact, it’s something we should all pay attention to as chronic high blood sugar levels are toxic to your body, destroying organs and blood vessels and paving the way to a heart attack, type 2 diabetes, stroke, dialysis, nerve damage, erectile dysfunction, or even blindness. Fortunately, there is a natural way of keeping your blood sugar levels in check, or if needed, to lower blood sugar, by eating the right foods and incorporating them into your regular diet. A study published in the Journal of Nutrition in 2010 found that due to their bioactive ingredients, a daily dose of blueberries increases sensitivity to insulin and may help reduce the risk of developing diabetes in at-risk individuals. (1) The reason this is so important is that too many carbs can produce excess insulin, which can in turn, lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Avocados Yes, Avocados are high in fat, but it’s good fat! They are full of monounsaturated fat which helps slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, which means less insulin release. Avocados also contain beta-sitosterol, a compound that can reduce inflammation after an intense workout. You can limit yourself to a quarter of an avocado at a time to avoid calorie overload, or, try avocado oil drizzled on a fresh salad or veggies. Chia Seeds Chi seeds are an ancient gluten-free grain which can stabilize blood sugar, help manage the effects of diabetes, improve insulin sensit Continue reading >>

What Fruits Can A Diabetic Eat?

What Fruits Can A Diabetic Eat?

Diabetics often ask whether it is safe for them to eat large quantities of fruit. Many diabetic patients avoid eating fruit because they are worried that the high sugar content found in most fruits will worsen their condition. Fortunately, there are many fruits a diabetic can enjoy which do not significantly affect blood glucose levels, in fact certain fruits may actually improve glucose control and insulin sensitivity over time. Good Fruits For Diabetics Fiber rich foods are generally safe for diabetics to eat because they tend to have a lower glycemic index (GI) and therefore do not spike blood sugar levels to the same extent as high GI foods. This is because fiber delays the emptying of stomach contents into the small intestine which slows down the absorption of sugar into the blood stream. Fiber rich fruits tend to be fruits with edible skins and seeds as it is these parts of the fruit that are highest in fiber. Fruits high in fiber include (fiber content in brackets): passion fruit (10.4%), raspberries (6.5%), apples (2.5%), pears (2.1%), apricots (2.1%), blueberries (2.7%), kiwifruit (2.1%), strawberries (2.0%), pomegranates (3.4%), and avocados (6.7%). 3 Foods to Throw Out Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com The avocado is not only high in fiber, but is also a rich source of monounsaturated fat. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends a diet high in monounsaturated fat as it can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease which is more common in diabetics than the general population. There is also some evidence that a diet rich in monounsaturated fat can improve glycemic control. Fruits high in fructose, and those with high fructose to glucose ratios are also beneficial to diabetics because fructose does not requ Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Mangoes?

Can Diabetics Eat Mangoes?

There's a lingering myth among diabetics, especially new diabetics, that you just plain can't have sweet things. It isn't a bad rule when it comes to cakes and cookies, but it certainly doesn't apply to healthful fresh fruits such as mangos. A reasonable portion of mango has little effect on your blood sugar and is good for you in many other ways, so feel free to enjoy them in moderation. One popular tool used to manage diet for diabetics is the glycemic index. It measures how quickly a given food causes your blood sugars to rise, comparing it to the effect of pure glucose. A food with a low number, or low GI, has less impact on your blood sugars than a food with a high number. Mangos have a low GI of 51, well below that of comparable tropical fruits such as pineapple or papaya. In other words, a reasonable portion of mango – roughly a quarter of a fruit – is about 1/2 cup of cubed fruit, and will have only minimal impact on your blood sugar. Counting Carbs The American Diabetes Association recognizes the value of calculating the GI of common foods, but it recommends focusing on your total intake of carbohydrates, rather than obsessing over GI numbers. By this standard, mangos still look like a good option. The same 1/2 cup contains 12 grams of carbohydrates, fewer than the 27 grams you'd find in a medium banana or a cup of red or green grapes. Nutrients in Mangos Keeping your blood sugar under control is important, but it's not the only measure of a food. Maintaining a healthy overall diet also means paying attention to how much nutrition a food packs,relative to the calories it provides – its "nutrient density" – as well as other factors such as its fiber content. Mangos score very well when considered in that light. They're high in vitamins C and A, contain t Continue reading >>

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

Adapted from The Carb Sensitivity Program It is no exaggeration—balancing your blood sugar could be a matter of life or death. Chronic high blood sugar levels are toxic to your body, destroying organs and blood vessels and paving the way to a heart attack, type 2 diabetes, stroke, dialysis, nerve damage, erectile dysfunction, or even blindness. The good news? Out-of-control sugar levels can be reigned in and regulated with the right foods. Here are most potent blood sugar-lowering foods so you know how to lower blood sugar levels naturally. Blood Sugar Benefit: A groundbreaking study published in the Journal of Nutrition in 2010 found a daily dose of the bioactive ingredients from blueberries increases sensitivity to insulin and may reduce the risk of developing diabetes in at-risk individuals. That's important because too many carbs produces too much insulin, which could lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adding blueberries to daily smoothies for six weeks also improves insulin sensitivity, so feel free to eat healthy doses of the superfood fruit, too. Added Perk: Low in naturally occurring sugars, blueberries are also packed with antioxidants that fight damage from free radicals, accelerated aging, and diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's. Blood Sugar Benefit: Don't let the fat content of avocados fool you—they're still good for you! Avocados are full of monounsaturated fat, the kind that helps slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, prompting less insulin release, and can even help to lower your cholesterol. Added Perk: Avocados contain beta-sitosterol, a compound that could help quell inflammation after an intense workout. Just limit yourself to one-quarter of an avocado at a time to avoid calorie overload. Or, try avocado oil drizzled on a Continue reading >>

What About All The Sugar In Fruit?

What About All The Sugar In Fruit?

If the fructose in sugar and high fructose corn syrup has been considered “alcohol without the buzz” in terms of the potential to inflict liver damage, what about the source of natural fructose, fruit? If you compare the effects of a diet restricting fructose from both added sugars and fruit to one just restricting fructose from added sugars, the diet that kept the fruit did better. People lost more weight with the extra fruit present than if all fructose was restricted. Only industrial, not fruit fructose intake, was associated with declining liver function and high blood pressure. Fructose from added sugars was associated with hypertension; fructose from natural fruits is not. If we have people drink a glass of water with three tablespoons of table sugar in it, which is like a can of soda, they get a big spike in blood sugar within the first hour (as you can see in my video If Fructose is Bad, What About Fruit?). Our body freaks out and releases so much insulin we actually overshoot, and by the second hour we’re relatively hypoglycemic, dropping our blood sugar below where it was when we started out. In response, our body dumps fat into our blood stream as if we’re starving, because our blood sugars just dropped so low so suddenly. What if you eat blended berries in addition to the sugar? They have sugars of their own in them; in fact, an additional tablespoon of sugar worth; so, the blood sugar spike should be worse, right? Not only was there no additional blood sugar spike, there was no hypoglycemic dip afterwards. Blood sugar just went up and down without that overshoot and without the surge of fat into the blood. This difference may be attributed to the semisolid consistency of the berry meals, which may have decreased the rate of stomach emptying compared Continue reading >>

Mangos - The Fruit That Can Lower Blood Sugar! - Wild Oats

Mangos - The Fruit That Can Lower Blood Sugar! - Wild Oats

By Dr. Daria | 4 Comments | Posted 05/16/2016 My daughter moved to Maui when she was 25 and lived there for a few years. She lived up country and became the most spectacular tour guide for hidden island treasures waterfalls, bamboo jungles, mango and avocado groves, magical places! Mango season in Hawaii is about 6 months long and the sweetness and flavor is such a nice addition to the diet of the islands. Even though mangos can be messy, I love them! Actually, I loved them even before I knew about mangiferin. Mangi-what? Just follow along In the fruit kingdom, mangos are unique. Mangos contain a substance that has been named mangiferin, a unique antioxidant with surprising health properties. This substance was identified in the 1960s with clinical papers appearing by the 1980s and covering all sorts of health benefits. A recent study looked at the effect of adding a small amount of freeze-dried mango to the diets of 20 adults who were obese. The supplemental mango was taken for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, blood sugar levels were significantly reduced. The subjects in the study were not diabetic but were considered to be at risk for developing the condition. Lower blood sugar levels are a good indication that eating mangos could be helpful in keeping blood sugars in check. In an older study published in 2011, laboratory animals were fed a high-fat diet (60% of calories from fat) and another group was fed the same diet with 1% of calories coming from freeze-dried mango. The group that received the mango along with the high fat diet showed a 35% lower (healthier) blood sugar level. In both these studies, the subjects were not diabetic. Fruits are high in sugar. We know that high blood sugar levels correlate directly with diabetes. We know that people with diabetes appropri Continue reading >>

3 Amazing Benefits Of Mango Leaves For Diabetics

3 Amazing Benefits Of Mango Leaves For Diabetics

It is well known that type 2 diabetes can lead to obesity due to elevated blood sugar levels, however this isn’t the only health complication it has. It can be accompanied by other health problems like poor vision, weakness, kidney failure, heart disease, hypertension, and nerve damage. Lifestyle changes and improving your diet has to be the first step to getting better, however there are other supplements, herbs and natural remedies that can help. One addition is mango leaves, which are full of benefits for diabetics. Why Mango Leaves Work Mango leaves are full of active compounds that control the symptoms of diabetes. They include: Caffeic acid which helps lower glucose Mangiferin which lowers cholesterol and triglyceride levels Flavonoids help reduce the occurrence of Type-2 diabetes and can prevent cardiovascular disease Gallic acid reduces the risk of heart attacks in Type-1 diabetes 3 Benefits of Mango Leaves Blood sugar control Managing blood sugar is the best way to manage diabetes. Mango leaves improve glucose distribution which lowers blood sugar. Cholesterol check High cholesterol damages your heart. Mango leaves are rich in pectin, vitamin C and fiber which lower cholesterol. Diabetic retinopathy prevention Retinopathy is a disease of the retina that can result in loss of vision or even blindness. It’s a direct result of uncontrolled blood sugar. The high amount of vitamin A in mango leaves supports good eye health. How to Use Them Boil water, then place 10-15 fresh mango leaves inside Leave them to cool overnight Strain and consume the mango leaves tea before eating or drinking anything else in the morning Repeat daily for 2-3 months The results will take some time to show, but have patience and your diabetes will become more manageable before you know Continue reading >>

How Mangoes Might Affect Blood Sugar And Obesity

How Mangoes Might Affect Blood Sugar And Obesity

Originally from South Asia, mangoes are now one of the most cultivated fruits in tropical regions. In recent years, the potential health benefits of mangoes have been widely investigated. There are a number of varieties of mango, all of which belong to the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. Globally, India grows the most mangoes, producing more than 18 million tons per year. Mangoes contain a variety of vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C, A, E, K, and a range of B vitamins. Other constituents include polyphenols, triterpene, and lupeol, which can benefit our health by providing antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this article, we will discuss some of the recent findings regarding mangoes and their effects on blood sugar, cholesterol, obesity, and diabetes. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about mangoes. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Some evidence suggests that mango consumption can help regulate blood sugar Mangoes contain a range of vitamins, including B vitamins In South Asia, mangoes have been cultivated for thousands of years Mangoes and cholesterol High cholesterol levels can be dangerous. If it builds up, cholesterol can block the arteries, potentially leading to heart disease, stroke, or heart attack. Currently, an estimated 73.5 million Americans have high cholesterol levels. Because of the huge number of people at risk, any simple dietary changes that might help reduce this figure are likely to be investigated. A study, published in The British Journal of Nutrition in 2011, looked at the effect of mangoes on cholesterol levels in mice. The mice were fed a high-fat diet either with or without the addition of freeze-dried mangoes. The team measured the mice's fat content, blood sugar levels, Continue reading >>

The Dark Nasty Truth About Fructose And Type 2 Diabetes

The Dark Nasty Truth About Fructose And Type 2 Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, there's one food you want to avoid at all costs – fructose. Consumption of fructose has been linked to increased weight gain, higher triglyceride levels (cholesterol), high blood pressure, insulin resistance, higher small dense LDL cholesterol and fatty liver, not to mention, it is a form of sugar so may send your blood sugar soaring also. Is that enough to raise your curiosity? Read on to discover the dark and nasty truth about this common food ingredient. What is Fructose? Fructose is a simple sugar that is naturally found in fruits. It is easy to remember this, because the word “fructose” actually sounds similar to the word “fruit.” Different fruits contain different levels of fructose and some vegetables also contain small amounts of it. If you’ve ever turned over a can of soda and looked at the label, you've probably noticed a different kind of fructose listed on it, called high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). This is a processed form of fructose that is used as a sweetener to replace sugar. On labels it can be labelled as HFCS or it may simply be labelled as fructose—either way, it's the same thing. The bad news is, you will find fructose in most processed foods from pizza sauce to crackers to breakfast cereal, just to name a few. And soon you'll find out that fructose is the worst of the worst when it comes to healthy eating… we'll get to that in just a moment. Fructose Nutrition Facts As mentioned earlier, the amount of fructose in fruits and vegetables varies greatly. Here are several examples of food that contain various amounts of natural fructose: 1 medium-sized apple w/skin = 13g of fructose 10 cherries = 4g of fructose 1 medium sized banana = 7g of fructose 1 sweet potato = 0.7g of fructose 5 medium strawberries = 5 Continue reading >>

Effect Of Mango (mangifera Indica, L.) Ingestion On Blood Glucose Levels Of Normal And Diabetic Rats

Effect Of Mango (mangifera Indica, L.) Ingestion On Blood Glucose Levels Of Normal And Diabetic Rats

Abstract The effects of the intake of flour obtained from mango pulp (Tommy Atkins cultivar) (6.85% soluble fiber, 11.96% insoluble fiber, 2.53% protein, 1.3% total lipids and 2.52% ash) on weight gain, dietary intake, glycemia and hepatic glycogen were studied in normal and diabetic rats. The diabetic animals eating diets containing 5, 10 and 15% mango flour during the 30 day study showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in blood glucose level in comparison to the diabetic controls eating a diet containing 0% mango. In the second study, diets with 0 and 5% mango flour were fed to diabetic rats to see if the 5% mango diet would still reduce blood glucose over a longer period. The blood glucose level of the rats consuming mango at the end of ninety days was 66% lower than that in the controls. In this study, it was also observed that the hepatic glycogen level of the animals fed mangos was 64% greater than in the controls, which might have contributed to the reduction in blood glucose in these animals. In addition, the animals fed mango had a higher serum insulin level (p < 0.05) than those in the control group. The results from this research suggest that mango flour can possibly help in the treatment of diabetes. Continue reading >>

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