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Do I Have To Take Metformin For Life

Metformin Forever?

Metformin Forever?

Hi all. We're new here. Just wondering about metformin. Dr wants hubby to start 1 pill a day soon. Is it forever or can he wean once his numbers are in check? Thanks! Moderator T2 since Oct 08, from insulin to no meds =) I can't really say much...but I've known of people going off the meds completely when their BG numbers are in checked...and just maintain it through diet and exercise...so I don't think metformin will be something forever if the BG numbers improves and comes down... Exercising and diet can help a lot in bringing down the BG as well...so if you exercise and ensure that you watch what you eat...you can actually help yourself in taking the meds off later on... Don't be surprise that you find that when the metformin starts, your gut will be really messed up...depending on person...if it happens...do not worry too much...its a common side effect of metformin and it will gradually go away...there are a few post on the forum on the side effect of metformin... ps: Do join the chat room...there are a few regulars there that would be more than willing to help answer any questions you have...cheers HbA1c: Oct 08 - 9.2% | Dec 08 - 5.5% | Feb 09 - 4.4% | June,Sep,Dec 09,Mar 10 - 5.2% | June, Aug 10 - 5% | Nov 10 - 5.3% | Dec 10 - 5.1% | Feb 11 - 5.2% | May 11 - 5.3% | Aug 11 - 4.6% | Dec 11 - 5% | March 12 - 5.1% | June 12 - 5.0% | Sept 12 - 4.9% | Dec 12 - 5.2% | March 13 - 4.8% | May 13 - 5.0% | Oct, Dec 13 - 5.2% | Mar 14 - 5.0% Hi and welcome to DD. Your question is very difficult to answer, many of us have not required any medication at all, yet. On the other hand, many have to take metformin or other oral medication for years and even then progressed onto insulin, we all react differently. Sorry I'm not able to give you any concrete answers. Hang in there, it Continue reading >>

Metformin: Do I Have To Take Diabetes Meds For Life? | Newsmax.com

Metformin: Do I Have To Take Diabetes Meds For Life? | Newsmax.com

Do I Have to Take Diabetes Meds for Life? By Peter Hibberd, M.D. | Friday, 31 October 2014 03:56 PM Question: I was just diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. My doctor put me on metformin. Will I have to take it for the rest of my life? Yes, you will probably be recommended to stay on metformin for as long as you have Type 2 diabetes. It is commonly used indefinitely to control the metabolic disorder. Type 2 diabetes can be controlled and sometimes even cured by weight management, and if this is done effectively, some patients may eventually be able to give up metformin after losing weight. Most patients choose to remain on metformin as it has an appetite-suppressant quality, in addition to regulating glucose metabolism. Your HbA1C a measure of your glucose level will guide you and your doctor in your treatment. Dont forget to have your urine checked for protein and micro-albumen levels, your eyes exmained for retinopathy, and your cholesterol managed properly. Its also a good idea to have at least annual foot evaluations for any signs of neuropathy. The good news is diabetes is a very manageable condition and, fortunately, side effects from metformin are actually quite uncommon. 2019 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Metformin - For Life Or Just For Xmas?

Metformin - For Life Or Just For Xmas?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Firstly - I've been a lurker on the forums since first diagnosed type 2 in July and wanted to express thanks for all the excellent advice in the forums. I guess having some time off has given me the chance to finally write down some of my worries/concerns, so here we go : Like lots of you the initial diagnosis was a shock at 42 and has led me to try and change my ways. I was put straight on Metformin (3x500mg per day) along with Simvastin (statin) and Ramparil (BP) - and given my weight 119kg (18.7 stone) and the shock of it all I didn't protest. Fast forward 6 months and I've lost 30kg(4.7st) through a fairly restrictive 1200cal low(ish) carb (target sub 100g daily) diet. Also, by nature I'm a geek, so I've measured *everything* I've eaten in that period. The local PTC won't give test strips to me, but I've funded my own and am testing first thing in the morning before food and in the evening (typically 2-4 hours after eating evening meal). These readings settled down to a weekly average of 5.2-5.6 in the mornings and 5.2-6.0 of an evening after about 3 months and have kept at those levels. In that whole period I've been lucky enough to have had three appointments with local diabetic nurse but I'm feeling a little lost. Post the diagnosois I've felt I'm not getting any form of personal care but having been put into a generic bucket and prescribed based on that. In my last appointment I confessed to going down the low carb route and I was admonished for not taking the standard advice NHS is giving. When I explained I'd done this in an informed way and done some serious reading and mentioned diabetes.co.uk (a resource give to me by them in intiial info Continue reading >>

Metformin, A Breakthrough In Life Extension Research

Metformin, A Breakthrough In Life Extension Research

As we already covered before, 2016 shows a lot of promise to be a great year for life extension research. One of the most interesting studies planned for this year is the TAME trial[1] (Targeting Aging with Metformin), a study that will test the use of aforementioned compound as a longevity drug in older adults who have cancer, heart disease, or cognitive impairment (or are at risk for these diseases). What is it, exactly? Metformin, also known as Glucophage ®, is an anti-diabetic drug that works by suppressing glucose production in the liver. Unlike the majority of diabetes drugs, however, it does not cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), even when given to non-diabetics. Metformin is a drug of the biguanide class. As such, it resembles the compounds guanidine and galegine, found in the Galega officinalis plant (aka goat’s rue). Goat’s rue was known to have anti-diabetic activity since ancient times, but it proved too toxic to use. The beginning of the history of metformin, however, has almost nothing to do with type 2 diabetes, but with an even worse disease: malaria. Malaria is a disease caused by a parasitic microorganism of the Plasmodium species. The typical treatment for malaria before the advent of synthetic drugs was quinine, an alkaloid extracted from the bark of the South American tree Cinchona officinalis. Quinine was expensive, and some parasites became resistant to it. Furthermore, the drug was imported from Java and the supply was unpredictable. In the 1930s, researchers began to discover and synthesize alternatives to quinine. A chemist named Francis H. S. Curd started investigating pyrimidine analogs at the ICI laboratories at Blackley, Manchester, after he noticed that some drugs with mild antimalarial activity had a pyrimidine ring in their struc Continue reading >>

Take Metformin If You Have Prediabetes

Take Metformin If You Have Prediabetes

Do you have prediabetes? You might be able to ward it off with the help of one of the diabetes drugs. Metformin might stop you from getting diabetes and could also help you in other ways. But persuading your doctor to prescribe it could be a challenge. The biggest and perhaps the best study of people who have prediabetes showed that taking metformin cuts the risk of diabetes by 31 percent. While this was less than the reduction of 58 percent that the “lifestyle intervention” provided, in real life we usually aren’t able to get that much guidance from our medical team. By “lifestyle intervention” the researchers meant being in a program that provided information, guidance, and support to help participants lose 7 percent or more of their weight and to get moderately intense physical activity — like brisk walking — for at least 150 minutes a week. But without that guidance, it typically takes a long time to help, and in fact it most people just don’t do it. Who Metformin Helps Most The study showed that metformin helped the most among younger people, and with people who had a high body mass index (BMI) or a high fasting blood glucose level. It doesn’t help seniors much. But the biggest problem with metformin is to have your doctor prescribe it. Only 3.7 percent of insured adults who had a prediabetes diagnosis were taking it between 2010 and 2012, according to a study that the Annals of Internal Medicine published last year. This very low proportion is probably because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration hasn’t approved metformin — or any other drug — for prediabetes. While doctors are free to prescribe it “off label,” some of them are hesitant to do that. Some Side Effects Like any drugs, metformin sometimes has unwanted side effects. The mos Continue reading >>

Will Metformin Become The First Anti-aging Drug?

Will Metformin Become The First Anti-aging Drug?

A committed group of scientists is seeking to validate metformin as the first-ever anti-aging medication.1,2 In this day of staggering drug prices, metformin is available as a low-cost generic. One mechanism by which metformin works is by activating AMPK, an enzyme inside cells that lowers blood sugar by promoting energy utilization. Activating AMPK has broad-ranging effects that extend far beyond blood sugar control. Studies show that boosting AMPK activity can prevent—and even reverse—the life-shortening effects of aging, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and more.3 In this article, we’ll review data that persuaded the FDA to allow metformin to be studied in humans as the first anti-aging drug.1 Broad-Spectrum Effects The most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug is metformin. It has been in use in England since 1958 and in the United States since 1995. Derived from a compound found in the French Lilac, metformin has a track record of safety and effectiveness at routine doses of up to 2,000 mg daily.4-7 So what evidence is there for the FDA to consider this drug as an anti-aging medication? The reason is simple: Metformin can block or diminish many of the fundamental factors that accelerate aging.8-12 These include protecting against DNA damage glycation, poor mitochondrial function, and chronic inflammation. Metformin has been shown to facilitate DNA repair, which is critical for cancer prevention. By attacking these fundamental degenerative processes, metformin can prevent the development of aging’s most troubling diseases. Metformin has also been shown to increase the production of known longevity-promoting signaling molecules in cells, such as mTOR and AMPK—all of which reduce fat and sugar storage and increas Continue reading >>

Why Is Metformin Considered The Drug Of Choice For Type 2 Diabetes?

Why Is Metformin Considered The Drug Of Choice For Type 2 Diabetes?

Gunda Siska, PharmD, has worked in various fields within the pharmaceutical industry as a licensed pharmacist for more than 20 years. She is currently a staff hospital pharmacist assisting nurses and doctors with drug prescribing, administration, and dispensing, as well as independently monitoring and dosing highly toxic and dangerous drugs. For 2 years, she was concurrently a consultant pharmacist for skilled nursing facilities and nursing homes. Dr. Siska is a member of the New Mexico Society of Health-System Pharmacists and the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine. Follow her on Twitter @GundaSiska Metformin is a medication that I believe is underappreciated by the general public. Many people ttell me that their doctor prescribed this drug for them, but they took themselves off of it, but if they knew what I know about metformin, they would have stayed on the medication. This is what I know: metformin extends life. It’s been proven in animal studies1 and in humans. A prospective observational study of nearly 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and arteriosclerosis found that metformin use was associated with 24% lower all-cause mortality compared to patients who were not taking metformin.2 It is also the number one go-to medication for type 2 diabetes for several years, despite all the new designer medications coming on the market trying to replace it. How does metformin save lives? Mainly through cardioprotection. Metformin reduces cardiovascular risk in humans.3 Most people with T2DM will most likely die from a cardiovascular event, especially if they are not on metformin.4,5,6 Metformin has so many positive effects on the body, no one really knows for sure all the ways it preserves life. It produces modest weight loss in the near term5 and blun Continue reading >>

Dear Mark: Metformin For Life Extension, Too Many Meds, Med For Lifting Addict, And Horseback Riding

Dear Mark: Metformin For Life Extension, Too Many Meds, Med For Lifting Addict, And Horseback Riding

41 Comments For today’s edition of Dear Mark, I’m answering four questions. First, does the diabetes drug metformin have life-extending potential for non-diabetics? Then, the final three questions come from the comment board of last week’s Minimum Effective Dose post. First, is it possible to try to do too many minimum effective dose workouts in a week. Yes, absolutely. I explain why a reader who seems to want to incorporate every single routine listed in last week’s post probably shouldn’t try. Next, what if someone truly loves training? Should he or she still try to figure out the minimum effective dose for his workouts? And finally, is horseback riding an effective stand-in for walking? Let’s go: I wondered if you had seen the New Scientist article on the anti-ageing metformin study being undertaken? Increases life expectancy, lowers heart disease and cancer risk …oh, and it’s a diabetes drug, so it works on lowering blood glucose! Which I imagine a primal blueprint would do too… Dan I haven’t seen the New Scientist article (it’s behind a paywall), but I am aware of the generally positive research being done on metformin. It’s becoming increasingly clear that not only diabetes patients may be able to benefit from metformin. Robb Wolf was beating this drum back in 2012. There are many indications of metformin’s life-extending potential: Metformin activates AMPK, the same autophagy pathway activated by exercise, fasting, polyphenol consumption, and reduced calorie intake. Metformin also seems to protect against many of the conditions that kill people, like cancer. It lowers hyperinsulinemia and may protect against insulin-related cancers (breast, colon, etc). Early treatment during adolesence, for example, protects rats against later tumor gro Continue reading >>

Metformin For Life? - Healthboards

Metformin For Life? - Healthboards

Hi I have been told I have PCOS and I have been taking BC and Metformin for over 6 months now. I read that Metformin gives you B12 dificency, is this true? I was also wondering, do I have to take this for the rest of my life? If I wish to get pregnant, when is a good time to stop taking BC? and do you take Metformin while you are preg? I am so confused and stressed, I am with someone now, who wants to marry but I have not told him that I have this PCOS I fear he will not want to marry a women who cannot give him a healthy baby in the future. Please help. P.s can anyone tell me what is the below: Hey! Don't know anything about the B12 deficiency. Depends on how long you want to ttc. You can stop taking the BC at any time, I've known women who got pregnant the very next day after not taking BC. As far as taking metformin while preggers, well that's something to notify your doctor. Also if he can't accept you for who you are then he is not worth marrying. There is more than one option for having a child. If he can't accept that then hunny move on cuz you'll be placing yourself in a lifetime of heartache no matter what you feel for him. Or just wait long enough for him to come to terms with it. Take care sweetie and lots of luck and baby dust to ya. I too have PCOS and taking 1000mg twice a day. My OB/GYN told me that metformin can be taken throughout first trimester. Unfortunately, it didn't work for me and I am on my first clomid cycle. Wish me luck I'm taking clomid so I can ovulate. I'm actually on my first cycle. I will have to take it for 3 mos hopefully to ovulate since metformin did not help to regulate my period. I was getting my period every other month. So my dr induced my period, she prescribed me provera. Then on the third day of my cycle I started taking clom Continue reading >>

Metformin For Life? | Sparkpeople

Metformin For Life? | Sparkpeople

you make a very good point. People who say they have tried diet alone usually refer to the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association and that is still much too high in carbs. Cutting down to 20-50 grams/day would work for a much larger percentage of type 2 diabetics if they only tried it for a couple of months and if it works keep doing it for life. I took metformin for 9 years. Not quite for life. Like you I just happened to bump into low carb as my way of managing type 2 diabetes after 9 years of freaking pills. Only one of my doctors over the years suggested diet as a management tactic. He did send me to a dietician, but looking back, the dietician really didn't know that carbs are the things to avoid to manage blood sugar. Grrrrrr. Years lost. Those drug commercials on TV that say "when diet and exercise aren't enough ..." True, but who tells you what the diet should be. Now medication free, and eating low carb FOREVER. Starting weight : 195.0 pounds (June 7, 2012) Final weight : 168.2 pounds (July 23, 2013) When I started on the Metformin they had me start with the 500 mg for 2 weeks, then add the 2nd 500 to it. I did have problems then, so I dropped back to the 500 for a couple more weeks and started feeling better with it then. I didn't even have a doctor when I was diagnosed and didn't know that it was carbs that were the problem, just the sugar. I threw out and gave away just about everything I had with sugar in it. Now I sometimes will go ahead and have something with sugar, but I try to not have too much of it and I will eat protein more like a piece of meat for my breakfast or a small omelet (I can't eat more than 1-1 1/2 eggs in the omelet. It was 3 months before I saw the Diabetes Educator and she went through the diet. Before then I got on an Continue reading >>

Metformin For Prediabetes

Metformin For Prediabetes

Prediabetes is, for many people, a confusing condition. It’s not quite Type 2 diabetes — but it’s not quite nothing, either. So how concerned should you be about it? For years, the jargon-filled names given to this condition — impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) — may have made the task of taking it seriously more difficult. But in 2002, the American Diabetes Association (ADA), along with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, inaugurated the term “prediabetes” to convey the likely result of not making diet or lifestyle changes in response to this diagnosis. In 2003, the threshold for prediabetes was lowered from a fasting glucose level of 110 mg/dl to one of 100 mg/dl. Then, in 2008, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) began recommending the drug metformin for some cases of prediabetes — specifically, for people under age 60 with a very high risk of developing diabetes, for people who are very obese (with a body-mass index, or BMI, of 35 or higher), and for women with a history of gestational diabetes. The ADA also said that health-care professionals could consider metformin for anyone with prediabetes or an HbA1c level (a measure of long-term blood glucose control) between 5.7% and 6.4%. But according to a recent study, metformin is still rarely prescribed for prediabetes. The study, published in April in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, found that only 3.7% of people with prediabetes were prescribed metformin over a three-year period, based on data from a large national sample of adults ages 19 to 58. According to a Medscape article on the study, 7.8% of people with prediabetes with a BMI of 35 or higher or a history of gestational diabetes were prescribed metformin — still a very low rate for t Continue reading >>

Dr. Keith Roach: Is Metformin A Lifetime Medication?

Dr. Keith Roach: Is Metformin A Lifetime Medication?

Dr. Keith Roach: Is metformin a lifetime medication? DEAR DR. ROACH: I have been taking metformin 500 mg once daily for several months, with little results. I am in my 70s, and overweight by 25 pounds. My average sugar level is still around 160. I read that metformin will drop your glucose level by only 20 percent. Will that percentage increase if I take more? If so, by how much? Do I have to take metformin for the rest of my life? Will my body ever correct itself? - R.I. ANSWER: Average sugar level, also called estimated average glucose, is a way to describe blood sugar control in people with diabetes or prediabetes. A level of 160 is equivalent to an A1c level (a more commonly used measure of blood sugar control) of about 7.2 percent This is a reasonable level for most people in their 70s, where lower levels ("tighter" control) increase the risk for dangerously low blood sugars. Most medicines are more effective at higher doses. For metformin, 500 mg twice daily is the most common dose I see. Although it can be dosed up to 1,000 mg twice daily, it's not much more effective in most people, and is more likely to cause side effects, especially nausea. Not everybody with Type 2 diabetes needs to be on medicine forever. Losing weight, exercising regularly and having a prudent diet with small amounts of simple sugars all may help treat diabetes, and I have had many patients stop all their diabetes medications when adhering to these recommendations. Readers may email Dr. Roach questions to [email protected] or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803. Digital access or digital and print delivery. Continue reading >>

Gave Up Metformin - Got My Life Back

Gave Up Metformin - Got My Life Back

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Discussion in ' Metformin/Biguanides ' started by fbirder , Jan 23, 2017 . After 7 months on metformin SR and huge problems with diarrhoea I gave up in October. My HbA1c had dropped from 9.9 to 6.8 over the first three months but, after then, my fasting CBG had changed not one jot. It seemed that it was making no positive difference at all. The gut problems were so bad that I just couldn't commit to anything in advance. Then three vital things were scheduled for November and December that I really, really couldn't miss. So I decided to stop the tablets. Straight away two things happened - my bowel habits returned to normal and my fasting CBG started to go up. But it dropped back down after a week. Now, three months later, my HbA1c is down to 6.4 - so I'm off the metformin for the foreseeable future. I wish I'd never been given it and that we'd tried seeing what weight loss (12 kg lost by calorie counting) and exercise alone could do. That way I wouldn't have had a totally ruined summer. - I have had ME for many years which gives me a chemical sensitivity and was diagnosed with type II diabetes in October 2016 I am on the 500 mg tablets of Metformin, whose active agent is Metformin hydrochloride (hence the chemical sensitivity). I'm aware there is a slow release version but in my case after taking Metformin for four or five days, I suddenly have bad aching around the shoulders downwards in my body and also a severe lethargy. - I am in my mid-60s and have never smoked and don't drink any alcohol. - I have also experienced exactly the same bad reaction after 4 or five days to 15 mg tablets of Pioglitazone, whose active agent is Pioglitazone hydrochloride Continue reading >>

Forget The Blood Of Teens. This Pill Promises To Extend Life For A Nickel A Pop

Forget The Blood Of Teens. This Pill Promises To Extend Life For A Nickel A Pop

Nir Barzilai has a plan. It’s a really big plan that might one day change medicine and health care as we know it. Its promise: extending our years of healthy, disease-free living by decades. And Barzilai knows about the science of aging. He is, after all, the director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. And, as such, he usually talks about his plan with the caution of a seasoned researcher. Usually. Truth is, Barzilai is known among his colleagues for his excitability—one author says he could pass as the older brother of Austin Powers—and sometimes he can’t help himself. Like the time he referred to his plan—which, among other things, would demonstrate that human aging can be slowed with a cheap pill—as “history-making.” In 2015, he stood outside of the offices of the Food and Drug Administration, flanked by a number of distinguished researchers on aging, and likened the plan to a journey to “the promised land.” Last spring, Barzilai traveled to the Vatican to discuss the plan at a conference on cellular therapies. It was the second time he’d been invited to the conference, which is a pretty big deal in the medical world. At the last one, in 2013, he appeared alongside a dwarf from Ecuador, a member of a community of dwarfs whose near immunity to diabetes and cancer has attracted the keen interest of researchers. The 2016 conference featured a number of the world’s top cancer scientists and included addresses from Pope Francis and Joe Biden. That Barzilai was invited was a sign not only of his prominence in his field but also of how far aging research, once relegated to the periphery of mainstream science, has come in recent years. That progress has been spurred by huge investments from Sil Continue reading >>

I'm In. Newbie Metformin Questions

I'm In. Newbie Metformin Questions

Well **** it! Here I am. Doc just called it Type 2 and prescribed Metformin and a visit with a diabetes educator plus a follow-up with him in 6 weeks. Is Metformin a lifelong thing can I get off it? Is it OK to push back and start with diet and exercise? If I had a hunch that will greatly help me. Anyhoo Just looking for some general tips on Metformin and maybe some questions to think about. A1C came back at 7.5% and two fasting GC's came back at 139 and 140. I picked up a monitor a month ago when I first saw the doc. AM readings are generally in the 130-140 range - However a few hours after meals i'm between 100 and 115 usually and I never had a random out of normal range. And....listen to your mothers - she warned me I needed to pay attention. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Ok I see this often can I get off this med. Whats more important your life or getting off a med. Can you get off of it some do, my diabetes has never been like that no matter what I have done but many do. Look at what you eat now, write down how many carb grams you eat in a day. If you can walk do so or do other exercise. So either you were high at other times because your a1c does not match your home tests. It is going to take lots of test to figure out if you are coming down to normal. The most common unfortunate side effect with metformin is GI distress. If you have that problem or diarrhea, call your doc's office and ask for an Rx for the extended-release; for many it solves the problem. Some can get off diabetes meds, some cannot. I started with Metformin and now take Metformin and Januvia. I would love to get off diabetes meds but I don't think it will happen any time soon. Make your lifestyle changes and see what your numbers are. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of Continue reading >>

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