diabetestalk.net

Do I Have To Inform The Dvla If I Have Diabetes?

What Medical Conditions Could Affect My Driving Licence?

What Medical Conditions Could Affect My Driving Licence?

When driving, you need to use many skills to control your vehicle, whilst being aware of what's happening around at all times, to be safe – it’s a complicated task. For this reason, there are many medical conditions that can influence your ability to drive. Medical Conditions to tell the DVLA about GOV.UK have a list of conditions online, that might affect your ability to drive. These conditions are divided into 8 categories: Neurological disorders (including epilepsy, tumours, neurodegeneration, implants) Cardiovascular disorders (including angina, arrhythmias, implants, hypertension) Diabetes mellitus (including insulin treatment, complications and transplants) Psychiatric disorders (including anxiety, dementia and learning disabilities) Drug or alcohol misuse or dependence Visual disorders (including cataract, colour blindness and night blindness) Reneal and respiratory disorders (including renal failure, asthma, and carcinoma) Miscellaneous conditions (including deafness, medication effects, driving after surgery and temporary conditions) In this article, we will talk about some of the most common conditions that you need to inform the DVLA about, and in the context of Group 1 licences (cars and motorcycles). Group 1 licences require ‘medical self-declaration’ of medical conditions – meaning that if you have or develop one of these conditions, you have a legal responsibility to tell the DVLA as soon as possible. If you don’t, you could face a £1,000 and be prosecuted if you’re involved in an accident. Vision The law states that to drive you must meet the minimum eyesight requirements. This means that you must be able to read the registration plate of another vehicle from 20 metres away whilst in good daylight (with contact lenses or glasses, if you we Continue reading >>

Driving And Diabetes

Driving And Diabetes

The Accu-Chek drivers survey revealed that many drivers with insulin-treated diabetes are unclear about the DVLA recommendations.1 Having diabetes does not mean you cannot drive, however there are some things to keep in mind before getting behind the wheel. Having diabetes requires you to be aware and take control of your condition whilst driving on the road. It is important to consider how it might impact you and other drivers, so knowing how to deal with your diabetes whilst driving will help you keep you on the road and hopefully hazard free. Practice safe driving Your ability to drive safely may be affected if you have a blood glucose level of 5.0mmol/l or below. If your blood glucose level is less than 4.0mmol/l or you feel hypoglycaemic, do not drive.2 Be prepared: Take regular breaks Keep snacks in your vehicle Always carry a blood glucose meter, additional tests strips and lancets with you Test no more than 2 hours before the start of the first journey and break long journeys to test every two hours whilst driving. More frequent testing may be required if for any reason there is a greater risk of hypoglycaemia for example after physical activity or altered meal routine.2 Some medication may cause hypoglycaemia – check with your healthcare professional Common hypoglycaemic symptoms whilst driving could include: Staying in lane may take more concentration Finding it more difficult to focus your eyes Changes in body temperature - having a warm flush or suddenly feeling cold Starting to feel tired and/or yawning Feeling a tingling sensation, particularly in your fingers, lips or tongue Shaking and uncontrolled movement A rise in your heart beat Feeling hungry Difficulty making decisions Stronger emotions than usual, such as angry, frustrated, worried, confused Wha Continue reading >>

Driving

Driving

Are you safe to drive? If you drive when you’re diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you must notify the DVLA using the confidential medical form DIAB1. It’s possible that the DVLA might write to your doctor to check whether you should continue to drive. The main concern is the possibility of you having a hypo while you are at the wheel, which could cause an accident. This could lead to you being charged for driving under the influence (of insulin), dangerous driving or driving without due care and attention. Even a mild hypo can affect your driving. Legally you need to test your blood glucose 30 minutes before you start driving, and then every two hours of your journey. You don’t have to test before each journey if you are doing lots of smaller trips at one time, as long as you test every two hours. You also need to make sure you have a hypo treatment and a snack with long-acting carbs in your car. If you feel your levels are low, stop driving as soon as it’s safe, remove the key from the ignition and get out of the driver’s seat. Don’t check your glucose level or treat your hypo while you’re driving. Once you’ve treated your hypo, wait for 15 minutes, recheck your blood glucose and eat some carbohydrate. When you feel completely normal, wait 45 minutes until you drive again. If you are considering learning to drive, or have just been diagnosed with type 1, consider discussing your driving and blood glucose management routine with your healthcare team. Driving other vehicles Being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes can also affect your entitlement to drive a minibus, coach, bus or lorry. You’ll need to fill out your medical questionnaire and report, then a specialist medical questionnaire you’re given by your diabetologist or GP. You’ll then need an appoin Continue reading >>

My Diabetes My Way

My Diabetes My Way

Having diabetes does not mean you need to give up driving, but it does mean you have to plan things in advance so your driving is safe and hazard-free. For your car insurance to be valid you must inform your insurance company as soon as you are diagnosed. This applies whether you control your diabetes through diet, tablets or insulin therapy. If your company wants to charge you a higher premium, you should get quotes from other companies for comparison, as the cost of car insurance can vary a lot. The DVLA licence categories are as follows: Group 1 licence: cars/motorcycles/minibuses (up to eight seats/up to 3.5 tonnes) Group 2 licence: large goods vehicles and passenger-carrying vehicles If you manage your diabetes with insulin therapy you must by law inform the DVLA by completing a DIAB1 form to apply for a Group 1 licence. This is decided on a case-by-case basis and if you are approved, your licence will be issued for one, two or three years. There is no fee for renewal. If you have or want to apply for a Group 2 licence, you need to complete a VDIAB1l form and send it to the DVLA. You should also read leaflet INS186 if you want to apply for vocational entitlement to drive larger vehicles (C1, C1E, D1, DIE, C, CE, D or DE). For more information on how to apply for a Group 2 licence and what the qualifying conditions are, click here . If you meet all the criteria your licence will be issued and reviewed annually. You must tell the DVLA if you have or develop any problems that affect your safety to drive. These include the following: Two severe hypoglycaemic episodes (hypos) in a year in which you needed help from another person) Developing complications from your diabetes that may interfere with your ability to drive, such as a deterioration in your sight or the inab Continue reading >>

Applying For A Driving Licence And Informing The Dvla

Applying For A Driving Licence And Informing The Dvla

If you have diabetes and drive, there are a number of factors which can play a part in whether you need to inform the Driving and Vehicle Licence Agency (DVLA). There is a lot of confusion about what needs to be done and additional forms that need to be completed if you have diabetes and are applying for a licence. Essentially, you need to tell the DVLA about your diabetes depending on how it’s treated and the type of licence you want or are applying for. This section details the forms you will have to complete when applying for a driving licence and the conditions you must meet in order to receive a driving licence. Do I need to inform the DVLA? If you don’t tell the DVLA about your diabetes or any other medical conditions that affect your driving when you should, you can be fined up to £1,000 and could even be prosecuted if you are involved in an accident as a result. For all If any of the following factors apply, you must inform the DVLA (denoted by * in the Figure 1): If you have suffered more than one episode of severe hypoglycemia within the last 12 months (driving cars or motorcycles only) If you have suffered any episode of severe hypoglycaemia within the last 12 months (buses, coaches or lorries) If you experience severe hypoglycemia whilst driving If you lose awareness of hypoglycemia If you have visual impairment in both your eyes or in one eye if it is your only fully functioning eye If you need to have laser treatment in both your eyes or in one eye if it is the only fully functioning eye If you have poor blood circulation or loss of sensation (such as caused by neuropathy) that means you need to drive only particular types of vehicles, such as those with automatic gearboxes or with hand operated accelerators or brakes If you develop a complication of Continue reading >>

Diabetic Drivers Who Use Insulin Can Be Fined Up To £1000 If They Fail To Tell Dvla This

Diabetic Drivers Who Use Insulin Can Be Fined Up To £1000 If They Fail To Tell Dvla This

Whether you have a car, motorbike, bus, coach or lorry licence, if your diabetes is treated by insulin they must tell the DVLA (or DVA in Northern Ireland). Failing to do so will result in a £1,000 fine, and if you become involved in an accident you may even be prosecuted. The measures have been put in place to ensure drivers’ safety on the roads. But what happens once you inform DVLA of your condition? Whether you have a car, motorbike, bus, coach or lorry licence, if your diabetes is treated by insulin they must tell the DVLA If you have a car or motorbike licence, you fall under the Group 1 driver category, and your licence will be renewed every one, two or three years. Any changes to your condition or treatment between each licence renewal should be reported. Drivers who are under medical supervision by a doctor and are only using insulin for a temporary period (less than three months) do not need to notify DVLA. The same applies for women with gestational diabetes less than three months after delivery. Mon, January 1, 2018 What types of Diabetes are there? From Types 1 & 2 to Gestational diabetes. If you are diabetic but not on insulin medication you do not need to let DVLA know. The only times you would are are listed by Diabetes UK: If you have had two episodes of severe hypoglycaemia within the last 12 months (where you ere completely dependent on another person to treat your hypo). You develop impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia (where you are unable to recognise the hypo when it starts). You experience a disabling hypo while driving. You have other medical conditions or changes to existing medical conditions which could affect your ability to drive safely. Examples are problems with vision (e.g. laser treatment/injections), circulation, or sensation (e.g. p Continue reading >>

Now You've Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes Does This Effect Driving?

Now You've Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes Does This Effect Driving?

Did you know that all women diagnosed with gestational diabetes should contact their vehicle Insurance providers to inform them of diagnosis? Many companies may say it's fine and that they do not need to know, but we advise that you get them to put a note on their system to protect yourself should you need to make a claim as by law it is YOUR responsibility to disclose this information. Informing your insurance provider should not effect your premium. DVLA notification If you control your gestational diabetes by diet or metformin, you do not need to notify the DVLA of your diagnosis. If insulin is used to control your gestational diabetes it is classed as temporary insulin treatment. You only need to inform the DVLA if you will be using insulin for 3 months or more, or if you continue to use insulin following the birth of your baby (i.e. you are diagnosed with type 1 or 2 diabetes following birth) for 3 months or more. Driving & gestational diabetes when using insulin - "five to drive" If you use insulin or glibenclamide to control your blood sugar levels then you are at risk of hypoglycaemia. Due to this risk, you should test your blood sugar levels before driving, every time you drive. It's advisable for your levels to be 5.0mmol/L or above before driving. Remember this phrase "five to drive." If you test and levels are below 5.0 then you should eat a snack which is suitable for the GD diet, which will raise levels slightly but not enough to cause hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar levels). If at any point you feel unwell then you should stop your vehicle in a safe place and test your blood sugar levels to check for hypoglycaemia. Leave yourself 15 mins before leaving to test and eat if needs be. Good foods to try for raising levels without spiking blood sugar levels to Continue reading >>

Advice For Drivers With Diabetes Controlled By Insulin, Or Other Medications Which Carry A Risk Of Inducing Hypoglycaemia

Advice For Drivers With Diabetes Controlled By Insulin, Or Other Medications Which Carry A Risk Of Inducing Hypoglycaemia

Anyone who is under insulin control for their diabetes or is treated by tablets in the Sulphonylurea or Glinide class, may apply for or renew vocational entitlements to drive categories C1, C1E, D1, D1E, C, CE, D or DE. Applying for or renewing vocational entitlements Stage one – application forms request application form DL1(NI) and a DIAB1 (VOC) medical questionnaire from Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA) customer services by telephoning 0300 200 7861 complete and return these to DVA for assessment before moving onto stage two Stage two – your own doctor's medical questionnaire if you are cleared to move on to stage two, you will be issued with form DIAB2 (VOC) medical questionnaire this form will be sent to either your own GP or your diabetes consultant (whoever manages your condition) DVA will pay for any fee charged for this questionnaire if required, you may also be issued with a DLM1 Medical Examination Report which must be completed by your own doctor* you are responsible for any fees that may be charged for completing the DLM1 form * Please read the ‘Further guidance’ section below for information on whether a DLM1 form is required. Stage three (insulin treatment only) – specialist medical questionnaire and examination This stage only applies to those treated with insulin. an independent hospital consultant who specialises in the treatment of diabetes will be nominated by DVA - the consultant will complete an Annual Diabetes Examination report based on an examination and assessment of you at the examination, the consultant will need to see the preceding three months continuous blood sugar/glucose readings available on a blood sugar/glucose meter with memory function and covering a three month period during which you were on insulin DVA will pay the fee fo Continue reading >>

Driving With Diabetes: The Facts

Driving With Diabetes: The Facts

Given it’s World Diabetes Day today (Monday 14 November) what better time to highlight the potential effects of diabetes mellitus on one aspect of daily life so many people take for granted: driving. Diabetes mellitus, commonly known as diabetes, is a chronic disease linked to high levels of glucose in the blood. Statistics show that the number of people with diabetes is increasing every year. The effects on living with diabetes day to day are well known, but what’s not so well known is how diabetes can also affect your driving. How does diabetes affect your driving? Millions of people with diabetes live full and busy lives. For many, being able to drive plays an important part in that. However, if you have diabetes, there is a risk of developing hypoglycaemia and ‘severe hypoglycaemia’ (a diabetic emergency that will affect your fitness to drive). Hypoglycaemic episodes can be very sudden events, with symptoms ranging from feeling nauseous to a loss of concentration, and potentially loss of consciousness. An episode of ‘severe hypoglycaemia’ means you’ll need assistance from another person. This is why it’s so important that you keep your diabetes under control. Treating diabetes Diabetes can be treated with insulin, tablets and/or diet control – it all depends on the individual. The treatment aims to control your blood glucose levels, and attempt to avoid the extremes of hyper and hypoglycaemia. Do you need to tell DVLA that you have diabetes? If you’re keeping your diabetes under control with diet only, then you don’t need to tell DVLA. However, if you're taking medication to control your diabetes, the following applies: So, to summarise, it’s a legal requirement to tell DVLA if you have a medical condition that could affect your driving. Of c Continue reading >>

Yourdiabetes - Dvla

Yourdiabetes - Dvla

If you are on a diabetes medication that requires you to inform the DVLA, (see table) it is your responsibility to do so. Hypoglycemia (low blood glucose levels) can lead to confusion and affect your ability to drive. This can increase the risk of accidents. Your ability to recognize and treat hypos, and the development of diabetes complications, may affect your ability to drive safely. By law you must inform the DVLA if you are on any of the medications listed in table 1 and / or You need laser treatment on both eyes, or in the remaining eye - if you have sight in one eye only. You are unable to read (with glasses or contact lenses if necessary) a car number plate at 20.5 metres (67 feet) or 20 metres (65 feet) where narrower characters are used. You develop any problems with your circulation or sensation in your legs or feet that make it necessary for you to drive certain types of adapted vehicles. You suffer from more than one episode of severe hypoglycaemia (severe hypoglycaemia is defined as a hypo requiring a third party intervention to treat the hypo) within 12 months, or if you or a carer are at high risk of developing severe hypoglycaemia. For Group 2 (bus or lorry) one episode of hypoglycaemia should be reported immediately. You develop impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia (delay or difficulty in recognizing the warning symptoms of a low blood glucose level) You suffer severe hypoglycaemia while driving. An existing medical condition get worse or you develop any other condition that my affect your driving ability. For drivers on insulin you must inform the DVLA, your licence will then be renewed every one, two or three years. Any changes to your condition or treatment which occurs between renewals should be reported when they happen and not wait until your ren Continue reading >>

New Dvla Standards For Diabetic Drivers

New Dvla Standards For Diabetic Drivers

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) published new standards for drivers who have diabetes mellitus a little over a year ago,1 allowing people with diabetes to drive group 2 vehicles (buses and lorries) for the first time in certain circumstances. Drivers who take insulin are still not allowed to drive emergency vehicles. It is drivers' responsibility to keep the DVLA informed of their diabetic status and how it affects their ability to drive, but GPs need to be aware of the latest standards and their legal and ethical responsibilities. Group 2 vehicles Drivers on insulin or oral medication that can induce hypoglycaemia can drive a group 2 vehicle provided they: Have had no episodes of hypoglycaemia requiring the assistance of another person in the past 12 months. Have full hypoglycaemic awareness (that is, are able to avoid the onset of hypoglycaemia by taking action after warning symptoms). Can demonstrate regular blood glucose monitoring at least twice daily with a meter with memory function. Have no other debarring complications of diabetes, such as eye problems. The DVLA will arrange annual review by an independent diabetic consultant, who must examine three months of blood sugar readings, which the patient collects on a blood glucose meter. If patients change from oral hypoglycaemics to insulin, they must tell the DVLA and stop driving group 2 vehicles.2 Group 1 vehicles Drivers must inform the DVLA if they are taking insulin. Drivers of group 1 vehicles (cars and motorbikes) using insulin must have an awareness of hypoglycaemia, have adequate blood glucose monitoring, not be a danger to the public and meet eyesight standards. Patients must inform the DVLA if they have had more than one episode of hypoglycaemia requiring assistance from another person in Continue reading >>

Driving With Diabetes

Driving With Diabetes

Tweet Having diabetes does not mean you cannot drive a car or a motorbike. Given that your diabetes is well controlled, and your doctor states that you are safe to drive, there is no reason why you cannot have a driving licence or hang on to your existing licence. Nonetheless, you may need to let your car insurance company and the Driving and Vehicle Licence Agency (DVLA) know that you have diabetes depending on your type of diabetes and how it is controlled. You should also keep up to date with the latest DVLA guideline changes to driving with diabetes. Who do I need to inform about my diabetes? No matter how your diabetes is treated, you must by law inform your insurance company that you have diabetes. If your diabetes is treated with insulin, you must inform the DVLA. If you are applying for a driving licence for the first time, and your diabetes is treated with tablets or insulin, you also must inform the DVLA. In addition: You must inform the DVLA if any diabetes complications develop that may affect your ability to drive safely. If you fail to inform the DVLA or your insurance company then your driving insurance will be invalid. You do not need to tell the DVLA if you are treated by diet alone or by tablets that do not bring on hypoglycemia. However, if you change from tablets to insulin treatment, then they must be informed. You do not need to tell the DVLA if you are treated by: Diet alone By tablets which carry no risk of hypoglycemia Non-insulin injectable medication such as Byetta or Victoza (unless you are also on tablets which do carry a risk of hypos) Tablets which are deemed to carry a risk of hypoglycemia are sulfonylureas and prandial glucose regulators. Unless you have other complications or reasons that may affect your ability to drive. For informatio Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Driving

Diabetes And Driving

For information about recent changes to Diabetes and Driving please link to the the Diabetes UK website www.diabetes.org.uk//About_us/News_Landing_Page/DVLA-agrees-to-redraft-licence-forms-for-drivers-with-diabetes/ There is no reason why you cannot be issued with or keep your driving licence if you have diabetes. However it does mean that there are certain points to consider to ensure that your driving is safe and hazard-free. For example, informing the dvla and your insurance company, managing hypoglycaemia and driving, your eyesight and restricted licenses. Download our New Safe driving and the DVLA leaflet Your blood glucose should be above 5.5mmol/l before driving see Driving Safely Informing the Driver Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA) You must by Law notify the Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) about your diabetes when you are diagnosed and if you are treated with Insulin or Tablets. You must tell them if you are already on tablets or insulin and are applying for a driving licence for the first time. You DO NOT need to tell the DVLA about your diabetes if you are treated by diet alone but you must tell them if you start taking tablets or change from tablets to insulin treatment. If your diabetes is treated with INSULIN you will not be able to hold a HGV, PSV OR LGV Vehicle Licence. However, legislation has been introduced to allow an application for the C1 licence needed to drive vans and small lorries (between 3.5 and 7.5 tonnes) subject to individual assessment. Applications will need a general check up by their GP and an individual medical assessment by a consultant. Medical legal requirements for driving Group 2 drivers are required to notify DVLA if they have diabetes treated with tablets. If they are then started on exenatide, liraglutide or a gliptin th Continue reading >>

Do I Need To Inform The Dvla About My Diabetes?

Do I Need To Inform The Dvla About My Diabetes?

Insulin, used for people with type 1 diabetes and some people with type 2, can cause your blood sugar to drop too low - so-called hypoglycaemia episodes, or hypos. So too can some tablets used to treat type 2 diabetes - mostly tablets called sulfonylureas, but also glinides. Hypos can cause drowsiness, dizziness and confusion: in severe cases they can lead to loss of consciousness or even be fatal. But hypos can also affect your ability to drive safely. So the DVLA has set out guidelines for people with all diabetes - and whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you need to know about them. Do I need to inform the DVLA about my diabetes? What precautions should I take if I have diabetes and drive? Diabetes is diagnosed on the basis of high blood sugar. High blood sugar in the long term can cause serious complications, regardless of which kind of diabetes you have. This is why your team will work with you to prevent your blood sugar from going too high. On the whole, however, keeping your blood sugars very tightly controlled may increase your risk of hypoglycaemia if you take medication that can cause it. Unless otherwise stated, the regulations below apply only to people with a Group 1 (car and motorcycle) licence. Your medical team can give you details about the requirements for Group 2 (bus and lorry) drivers. Low blood sugar usually causes symptoms when your blood sugar is below 4 mmol/L. These include: Tingling around the lips or blurred vision. If you don't act on these early symptoms with treatment to increase your blood sugar, later symptoms include: According to the DVLA, an episode of severe hypoglycaemia doesn't specifically depend on the level of your blood sugar, but whether or not you are able to treat the episode yourself. An episode of severe hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Dvla Requirements For Group 2 Drivers

Dvla Requirements For Group 2 Drivers

If you are a Group 2 driver (bus / lorry) and are insulin treated, there are DVLA guidelines that specifically apply to you. GlucoMen Areo has a massive 730 test memory with date and time, to help group 2 drivers comply with the latest requirements for driving. Insulin Treated Group 2 Drivers (Lorries and Buses) If you are insulin treated then you need to satisfy the following blood glucose monitoring criteria to hold a group 2 licence: Regularly monitors blood glucose at least twice daily and at times relevant to driving, (no more than 2 hours before the start of the first journey and every 2 hours while driving), using a glucose meter with a memory function to measure and record blood glucose levels. More frequent testing may be required if for any reason there is a greater risk of hypoglycaemia for example after physical activity or altered meal routine At the annual examination by an independent Consultant Diabetologist, 3 months of blood glucose readings must be available Advised to use a modern blood glucose meter which has a memory chip The following criteria also need to be satisfied: No episode of hypoglycaemia requiring the assistance of another person has occurred in the preceding 12 months Must demonstrate an understanding of the risks of hypoglycaemia There are no other debarring complications of diabetes such as a visual field defect. Who do I need to inform to ensure I keep my licence? You may need to let your car insurance company and the Driving and Vehicle Licence Agency (DVLA) know that you have diabetes depending on your type of diabetes and how it is controlled. No matter how your diabetes is treated, you must by law inform your insurance company that you have diabetes. If your diabetes is treated with insulin, you must inform the DVLA. If you are Continue reading >>

More in diabetes