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Do Diet Drinks Affect Diabetes?

Diet Sodas Might Not Raise Diabetes Risk

Diet Sodas Might Not Raise Diabetes Risk

November 15, 2016 / 8:00 PM / a year ago (Reuters Health) - Drinking colas and other sugary drinks is tied to an increased risk of so-called pre-diabetes, a precursor to full-blown disease, but diet soda is not, a recent study suggests. Regular and mini cans of Diet Coke and Diet Pepsi are pictured in this photo illustration in New York August 5, 2014. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri Previous studies on the link between diet sodas and diabetes have been mixed; some research pointing to a potential connection has suggested this relationship may be explained at least in part by soda drinkers being overweight or obese. In the current study, however, adults who routinely consumed at least one can of soda or other sugar-sweetened beverages a day were 46 percent more likely to develop elevated blood sugar levels than people who rarely or never drink cola. Emphasis should be placed on substituting sugar-sweetened beverages with water, unsweetened teas, or coffee, said senior study author Nicola McKeown, a nutrition researcher at Tufts University in Boston. For daily consumers of sugary drinks, kicking the habit may be a difficult challenge, and incorporating an occasional diet soda, while increasing fluids from other sources, may be the best strategy to ultimately remove sugar-sweetened beverages from the diet, McKeown added by email. Globally, about one in nine adults have diabetes, and the disease will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030, according to the World Health Organization. Most of these people have Type 2, or adult-onset, diabetes, which happens when the body cant properly use or make enough of the hormone insulin to convert blood sugar into energy. People with blood sugar levels that are slightly elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis, are sometime Continue reading >>

Two Diet Drinks A Day Could Double The Risk Of Diabetes, Study Finds

Two Diet Drinks A Day Could Double The Risk Of Diabetes, Study Finds

Two diet drinks a day could double the risk of diabetes, study finds Diet drinks were linked with a raised risk of diabetesCredit:John Taylor Two fizzy drinks a day could double the risk of diabetes - even if they are diet versions -a Swedish study has found. Research by the Karolinska Institute on 2,800 adults found that those who consumed at least two 200ml servings of soft drinks daily were 2.4 times as likely to suffer from a form of type 2 diabetes. Many fizzy drinks are sold in 330ml cans, meaning that one and a half cans would be enough to double the risk. Those who drank a litre of such drinks saw a 10-fold rise in their chance of suffering from the condition. The increased risks were the same regardless of whether the drinks were sugary or artificially sweetened, the research published in the European Journal of Endocrinology found. Researchers said the sugary drinks may have induced insulin resistance, triggering the cases of diabetes. The new research examined links between soft drink consumption and diabetesCredit:Frank Augstein/AP The artificial sweeteners in the diet drinks may stimulate and distort appetite, they said, increasing food intake, and encouraging a sweet tooth. Such sweeteners might also affect microbes in the gut leading to glucose intolerance. The research was a retrospective study, which relied on participants to recall their diet habits. Josefin Edwall Lfvenborg, lead author, said soft drinks might influence glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, leading to the increased risk of latent auto-immune diabetes, a form of type 2 diabetes. In this study we were surprised by the increased risk in developing autoimmune diabetes by drinking soft drinks, he said. We next plan on investigating what could counter this risk. More research was nee Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Diabetes

Diet Soda And Diabetes

In reply to my recent blog entry “Stopping Diabetes Medicines,” Patsy wrote: “I have stop[ped] drinking Diet Cokes, or anything with artificial sweeteners. I can’t tell you what a difference that has made! … I am overweight and have lost 14 pounds. My blood sugar has gone down, too.” How could this be? How could diet sodas, which have essentially no carbohydrates and no calories, raise blood glucose and weight? Or is the whole thing an illusion? Four studies in the last decade have raised concerns about diet soda. In 2005, University of Texas researchers reported that people who drank diet soda were more likely to gain weight than those drank regular soda. Fewer calories = more weight! Strange… In 2006, Dartmouth scientists found that people with diabetes who drank one or more cans of diet soda a day raised their A1C levels by an average of 0.7%, compared to those who didn’t. In 2007, the American Heart Association found that those who drank either regular or diet soda had a higher risk of “metabolic syndrome,” which includes diabetes, high blood pressure, high levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and obesity, compared to nondrinkers. This is just a correlation; it doesn’t show cause, but it’s still interesting. In the January 16, 2009 issue of Diabetes Care, a group of analysts reviewing the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis found that “Daily consumption of diet soda was associated with… a 67% greater relative risk of… Type 2 diabetes compared to non-consumption.” They said the increased diabetes was not due to increased weight, although that happened too. “Associations between diet soda consumption and Type 2 diabetes were independent of baseline measures of adiposity or changes in these measures,” they wrote. The data was adj Continue reading >>

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

I’m confused by news that drinks containing artificial sweeteners can lead to diabetes. I know you advise against the use of artificial sweeteners, but does this study mean that we should drink “regular” instead of diet sodas? You will be much better off not drinking any sodas at all. The results of the study connecting artificial sweeteners with metabolic syndrome, a collection of conditions that together dramatically increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, by no means vindicate sugar. Instead, they suggest that artificial sweeteners are as bad for health as too much sugar. The study, from Israel, showed that artificial sweeteners altered the collection of bacteria (known as the microbiome) in the digestive tract in a way that caused blood glucose levels to rise higher than expected and to fall more slowly than they otherwise would. This finding may solve the longstanding mystery of why drinking artificially sweetened diet sodas doesn’t lead to weight loss. It also strongly suggests that the use of artificial sweeteners has been contributing to the worldwide obesity epidemic and rising rates of type 2 diabetes. To arrive at their conclusions, the Israeli researchers gave 10-week old mice water sweetened with saccharin, sucralose or aspartame, plain water, or sugar-sweetened water. After one week, the mice that received the artificially sweetened water had developed glucose intolerance, the first step on the path to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. With glucose intolerance, the body cannot easily handle large amounts of sugar. The researchers next gave the mice antibiotics, which killed the bacteria in the animals’ digestive systems. The glucose intolerance disappeared, supporting the hypothesis that this condition is caused by a change Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Soda?

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Soda?

When you have diabetes, it's easy to feel limited by what you can eat and drink. Although you might occasionally be tempted to stray from your healthy meal plan, you're best to avoid dietary temptations and consume only what your doctor deems appropriate. If you've been previously accustomed to drinking soda, diet alternatives should be safe for you. Video of the Day The American Diabetes Association lists diet soda among the beverages that are safe for diabetics to consume. Diet soda is typically sweetened with one of five artificial sweeteners, including aspartame. These sweeteners do not contain calories, and the ADA reports that they will not cause a blood glucose reaction. Many common flavors of soda are available in diet versions, including cola, root beer, lemon-lime and orange. Risks of Diet Soda The safety of artificial sweeteners is highly contested, although the National Cancer Institute reports that no proof exists linking the Food and Drug Administration's approved artificial sweeteners to cancer. A greater risk in frequently consuming artificially sweetened soda is consuming unhealthy foods because you aren't drinking a high-calorie beverage. A study published in 2010 in the "Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine" that found those who drink heavy amounts of diet soda are more likely to be obese than those who don't drink diet soda, and obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes. Even if drinking diet soda is safe for diabetics, you shouldn't make a habit of consuming this type of beverage. Diet soda has little nutritional value, and consuming a caffeinated flavor can harm your ability to sleep soundly. Excessive caffeine consumption can also lead to side effects, including anxiety and restlessness. Ceasing to consume caffeine can lead to symptoms su Continue reading >>

Can Diet Soda Cause High Blood Sugar?

Can Diet Soda Cause High Blood Sugar?

Toronto-based journalist William McCoy has been writing since 1997, specializing in topics such as sports, nutrition and health. He serves as the Studio's sports and recreation section expert. McCoy is a journalism graduate of Ryerson University. The lack of carbs in diet soda means it won't cause a blood sugar response.Photo Credit: George Doyle/Stockbyte/Getty Images Whether you are a diabetic who is vigilant about monitoring your blood sugar or someone who is careful to avoid blood sugar spikes because of how they affect your energy, it's safe to include diet soda in your diet. Unlike traditional flavors of soda sweetened with sugar, diet soda doesn't contain carbohydrates and won't cause high blood sugar. Diet soda products are sweetened with artificial sweeteners such as aspartame, sucralose and acesulfame potassium. These sweeteners are an alternative to sugar and not only result in the drink having zero or very few calories, but also no carbohydrates. The lack of carbs in your diet soda means the drink itself won't cause your blood sugar to increase. These drinks are a stark contrast to the traditional forms of soda, which causes a rapid blood sugar increase. Although your diet soda won't result in an increase in your blood sugar, be wary of the snacks you eat while enjoying your drink of choice. Snacks such as fries and crackers, despite not tasting overly sweet, rank high on the glycemic index. This ranking means they cause a rapid blood sugar increase, which can be problematic even if you're not diabetic. A quick rise in your blood sugar soon results in a quick blood sugar fall, which can make you feel hungry and tired. Although diet soda won't cause an increase in your blood sugar, there's evidence that regularly including artificial sweeteners in your diet Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Managing blood sugar levels is an everyday goal for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While eating sugar doesn’t cause either type of diabetes, keeping tabs on carbohydrate and sugar intake is an important part of managing both types of diabetes. Eating healthfully can also reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. In fact, obesity is one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of American adults are considered obese. Obesity puts you at risk for diabetes, as well as other troublesome conditions. Eating processed foods that are high in sugar, unhealthy fats, and empty calories increases your risk of gaining too much weight. Drinking sugary drinks is also a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. If you are working to keep your blood sugar in check or manage your weight, you might choose diet soda. Low in calories and sugar, diet sodas appear to be a good alternative to sugary drinks. Diet coke and A&W’s diet root beer, for example, claim to be entirely sugar-free. Unfortunately, even though they contain no actual sugar, they are loaded with artificial sweeteners and other unhealthy additives. At one time, there was much debate over the safety of artificial sweeteners. Many feared that these sweeteners caused certain types of cancer. Studies performed in the 1970s suggested that the artificial sweetener saccharin was linked to bladder cancer. Since that time, however, saccharin has been deemed safe. Both the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) consider the sweetener nontoxic. Aspartame, another common yet controversial sweetener, has also gained clearance fo Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Diet Soda Increase Your Blood Sugar?

Does Drinking Diet Soda Increase Your Blood Sugar?

If you're watching your blood sugar levels, you're probably aware that drinking regular soda can quickly cause your blood sugar levels to spike due to the large amounts of easily absorbed sugars it contains. But you might not be aware that diet soda may also have an effect on your blood sugar levels, although research in this area isn't conclusive. Drinking diet soda by itself isn't likely to cause spikes in your blood sugar levels. A study published in "Diabetes Care" in December 2009 found that drinking diet soda had the same effect on blood sugar and insulin levels as drinking carbonated water. When consumed along with carbohydrates in the form of glucose, however, the diet soda did increase the amount of a substance called GLP-1 in the blood that may delay stomach emptying and minimize the effect of the carbohydrates on after-meal blood sugar levels, although more research is needed to verify this effect. Fasting Blood Sugar Consuming diet soda at least once a day was associated with an increased fasting blood sugar level and a higher waist circumference compared to not consuming any soda, according to a study published in "Diabetes Care" in April 2009. This translated to a 67 percent higher chance of developing type-2 diabetes and a 36 percent higher risk for metabolic syndrome. Another study, published in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" in April 2012, compared the effects of drinking diet soda on people following either a healthier diet or a typical Western diet and found that people following the healthier diet had a lower risk for metabolic syndrome than those following the Western diet. In addition, the study indicated that drinking diet soda sometimes, but not always, increased the risk for metabolic syndrome somewhat even when following the healt Continue reading >>

Can Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

Can Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. Diet soda has become a staple in the American meal. There are virtually no calories in diet soft-drinks, so we can have as much as we want, right? Well, according to many current published studies, not so fast. Diet soda seems to be one factor in the obesity epidemic and in the development of diabetes. Wait, you say — it's chocolate cake, pizza, and even bread…but don't take away my diet soda! Studies have postulated several mechanisms for the increased risk of diabetes from consumption of diet soda. One ingredient in some diet soda, aspartame, has been shown to be metabolized in a way that potentially causes insulin production to increase too much. Aspartame is a protein derived from phenylalanine and aspartic acid, two proteins that when combined, taste sweet. It is also theorized that because diet soda tastes so sweet, it changes our cravings, making us actually want to eat things that taste sweet. Therefore, consuming more diet soda would prompt us to consume more calories, and not healthy calories. I myself have always thought I tend to eat more food if I have soda as a beverage. If I drink water at a meal, for example, I do tend to eat less. Try it and see for yourself! Another reason to avoid soda would be that soda is acidic in nature and generally not great for the stomach, especially if you suffer from reflux. Let's not forget that diet cola and other drinks can have a considerable amount of caffeine, which can raise Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diabetes is a condition characterized by high amounts of sugar in the blood. These high blood sugar levels are a result of the body's inability to either produce or use a hormone called insulin. Insulin's role is to move sugar from the blood and into the cells of the body where it is used to make energy. Contents of this article: Sugary sodas and diabetes Diabetes is marked by high blood sugar, known medically as hyperglycemia. As such, drinks which have a lot of sugar in them should be avoided as they cause spikes in blood sugar. There are three major types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. There is no direct cause of type 1 diabetes. Factors that can increase the risk of type 1 diabetes include: Drinking cow's milk at an early age may also play a role in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. The body is unable to use insulin fully or make enough of it to keep up with sugar intake. Type 2 diabetes shows links to: Inactivity Genes Age Family history of type 2 diabetes Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes affects women during pregnancy. If the body cannot make enough insulin to carry the sugar to cells to be used or if there is insulin resistance present, the woman may be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. One recent study posted in the BMJ found a link between drinking sugary drinks and the risk of type two diabetes. Another study posted in Diabetes Care found that people who drink 1-2 sugar-sweetened drinks every day have a 26 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who do not. Other things to consider about sugar-sweetened sodas: Plaque loves soda: The bacteria that make Continue reading >>

Diet Soft Drinks - Health Risks Of Artificially Sweetened Fizzy Drinks And Sodas

Diet Soft Drinks - Health Risks Of Artificially Sweetened Fizzy Drinks And Sodas

Diet soft drinks generally don't affect blood sugar levels Soft drinks (also called pop, sodas, fizzy drinks) generally refer to flavoured non-alcoholic drinks. Diet soft drinks, which are artificially sweetened are often a popular option for people with diabetes as they generally have an insignificant effect on blood glucose levels . As a general rule, people with diabetes wishing to have a soft drink will usually want to choose diet soft drinks over sugary versions. Exceptions to this general rule are if someone with diabetes actively needs to treat or avoid low blood sugar levels developing as a result of medication such as insulin . The majority of diet drinks have no sugar and should not raise blood sugar levels. However, it is worth checking the carbohydrate value on the packaging if you are unsure or are trying a new diet soft drink. Diet drinks in pubs, bars and restaurants Most bars and restaurants in the UK these days serve at least one diet soft drink. Diabetes.co.uk is aware that people with diabetes are occasionally served full sugar soft drinks accidentally by bar or restaurant staff. This is more likely to happen in loud or busy environments. It may be possible to reduce the chances of being served a sugary soft drink by accident by: Checking with the bar or waiting person that it is a diet soft drink Asking for the diet soft drink in a can or bottle (where this is possible) Telling the bar or waiting person why you need it to be a diet drink Artificially sweetened soft drinks are often referred to as diet drinks because the sweeteners used are very low calorie. It would make sense to assume that low or zero calorie drinks would not contribute to weight gain but some research studies have indicated that diet drinks may be associated with weight gain. One Continue reading >>

Should You Ditch Diet Sodas?

Should You Ditch Diet Sodas?

The debate about which foods belong in a “healthy diet” (and which don’t) is ongoing – especially when it comes to diabetes. Are carbs the enemy? Should you cut out gluten? Should you sign up for that 21-day detox? And, one of the most controversial questions: Should you drink diet soda? While many organizations, such as the ADA and AND take a fairly neutral stance on artificial sweeteners found in diet sodas, stating that there is room for nutritive sweeteners (non-caloric, alternative sweeteners) in an otherwise healthy diet, I personally take a more conservative approach with my clients. Nutritional science is still a relatively new scientific field, relative to other bodies of scientific research, leaving a lot to still be discovered about long-term effects of many processed foods that have not even been around for a century. In general, I am an advocate for whole foods—foods that are as minimally processed as possible and provide an abundance of nutritive value to those that consume them. Within this logic, since diet sodas fall short of providing any nutritional value, they should be treated more as a novelty than a dietary staple. If you are still on the fence about consuming diet sodas regularly, here are some things to consider before picking up that sugar-free cola: Even “natural” sugar alternatives are processed Some sodas get their sweetness from more natural sources than others – but this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s good for you. Stevia, for instance, is a sugar substitute derived from the stevia plant, which has been used for over a thousand years by native tribes in South America to sweeten foods and teas. Unfortunately, the stevia that is found in your local grocery store is a cousin far removed from the traditional stevia leaf vers Continue reading >>

Will Diet Coke Raise Blood Sugar Levels Up In Diabetics?

Will Diet Coke Raise Blood Sugar Levels Up In Diabetics?

People with diabetes often switch to sugar-free products if they want to indulge a craving. For example, they might try sugar-free cookies or diet products that are made especially for diabetics or contain no added sugars. Based on that concept, switching to drinking Diet Coke might seem like the best choice. However, diabetics need to consider certain things before trying diet sodas. Video of the Day Diet Coke contains two sweeteners: aspartame and acesulfame-K, also known as acesulfame potassium. Diet Coke also contains artificial colorings and flavorings that have no effect on blood sugar. Blood Sugar Reactions Both sweeteners used in Diet Coke are considered safe for diabetes, according to Mayo Clinic. However, while the artificial sweeteners won’t raise blood sugar, the caffeine in it might. A 2004 study led by researchers at Duke University showed that caffeine consumption can increase blood sugar levels by up to 8 percent. Scientists are not sure why caffeine has this effect on glucose but are still recommending diabetic patients cut down their caffeine consumption as much as possible. Although the sweeteners in Diet Coke don’t directly affect blood sugar levels, they can still lead to other problems. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, the sweet taste of Diet Coke can confuse your brain. In normal circumstances, sweet foods have lots of calories. When you drink diet soda, your brain is expecting you to consume calories. When you don’t, your hunger will increase, forcing you to eat more to make up for the calories your brain is expecting. The cravings for extra food can be cravings for carbohydrates as well, which would affect your blood sugar. So indirectly, Diet Coke can affect your glucose if you don’t pay attention and give in to the cra Continue reading >>

Could Artificial Sweeteners Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Could Artificial Sweeteners Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Sept. 17, 2014 -- If you’re one of the millions of Americans for whom diet sodas and artificially sweetened desserts play leading roles in efforts to shed pounds and help prevent long-term diseases like diabetes, new research might give you pause. The work, done with mice and humans, suggests that artificial sweeteners could raise your blood sugar levels more than if you indulged in sugar-sweetened sodas and desserts. Blame it on the bugs in your gut, scientists say. They found that saccharin (a.k.a. Sweet‘N Low), sucralose (a.k.a. Splenda) and aspartame (a.k.a. NutraSweet and Equal) raised blood sugar levels by dramatically changing the makeup of the gut microorganisms, mainly bacteria, that are in the intestines and help with nutrition and the immune system. There are trillions of them -- many times more than the cells of the body -- and they account for roughly 4 pounds of your body weight. Scientists in recent years have focused more and more on the link between the gut microorganisms and health. In the latest research, “what we are seeing in humans and also in mice is this previously unappreciated correlation between artificial sweetener use” and microorganisms in the gut, said Eran Elinav, MD, one of the scientists involved in the new study. Elinav and a collaborator, Eran Segal, PhD, spoke at a press conference held by Nature, the journal that published their team’s findings. Both of the scientists are on the faculty of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. “Initially, we were surprised by the results, which is why we also repeated them multiple times,” Segal said. Industry groups said the small number of mice and people studied make the findings hard to apply to larger populations. But one scientist not involved in the research called the sm Continue reading >>

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