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Do Diabetics Sweat?

5 Reasons For Heavy Sweating With Diabetes

5 Reasons For Heavy Sweating With Diabetes

Whether you are sitting in a stuffy room or working out at the gym, excessive sweating can be noticeably uncomfortable. People with diabetes can be prone to excessive sweating, which can also lead to dehydration and other health complications. Discover 5 reasons for heavy sweating with diabetes and what you can do about them. 1. Blood Glucose Levels Heavy sweating is often linked to low blood glucose levels known as hypoglycemia. When blood glucose levels plummet, it triggers a “fight or flight “response from your body. As a result, your body produces additional norepinephrine and adrenaline. This can lead to heavy sweating as well as shakiness and anxiety. It is important to get your blood sugar back to normal as soon as possible to alleviate this sweating. Keep glucose tablets, a few pieces of hard candy or a can of regular soda handy to increase your blood sugar levels quickly. Try to maintain better blood sugar control by taking medications and insulin as directed, eating regular meals and snacks and exercising daily. Use a blood sugar monitor to gauge your glucose levels. 2. Hyperthyroidism Another reason for heavy sweating is hyperthyroidism, a metabolic condition that people with diabetes may be prone to. The thyroid gland, which is located in your neck, produces key hormones in response to signals sent by your brain. These hormones work to increase or decrease your metabolic rate. When the thyroid gland is overactive, it is referred to as hyperthyroidism. More hormones are secreted than usual, which boosts your metabolic rate. This can cause heavy sweating, weight loss, hair loss, heart palpitations, dry eyes, tremors and nervousness. Some people might also have difficulty breathing or swallowing. Treatments may include medication, radioactive iodine and in Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Makes You Sweat Excessively

Why Diabetes Makes You Sweat Excessively

ByAriba Khaliq , Onlymyhealth editorial team Progression of diabetes causes damage to nerves. Fluctuations in blood sugar levels can cause sweating. Hypoglycaemia should be treated as early as possible. Antiperspirants can help control excessive sweating. Excessive sweating is a common concern of diabetics, especially the patients of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar). According to American Diabetes Association, diabetics have several bouts of excessive sweating no matter how well you are managing your diabetes. Excessive sweating is more common in diabetics who are overweight. Nerve Damage The progression of diabetes over time can damage the autonomic nervous system. It is quite rare but it may impact heart rate, blood pressure, perspiration and digestion. Owing to this, diabetes is often regarded as the causes for autonomic neuropathy. In most cases, nerve damage causes pain while in other cases the body functions get interrupted. Fluctuations in Blood Sugar Levels Despite administration of diabetes, a patient could have blood sugar fluctuations from high to low and low to high. Disorder Treatments The conditions such as hypoglycaemia should be treated as soon as identified. Any delay in treatment for medical conditions such as nerve damage could make blood glucose levels go out of control. Treatments for hypoglycaemia or autonomic neuropathy may result in complications such as excessive sweating. Frequent Night Sweats When you are having have trouble sleeping due to cold sweat in night too often. Generalized sweating When sweating does not confine to head, face, underarms and groin, but wholethe body. Asymmetrical sweating Unusual sweating such as sweating in one armpit is another indication which indicates the need to seek help. Change in sweating pattern Sudden sweat Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Many people with diabetes will experience times when they sweat too much, too little, or at odd times. Diabetes-related nervous system damage and low blood sugars cause these commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Sweating complications can be a sign of poor diabetes management. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial to both prevention and treatment. Contents of this article: Diabetes and sweating problems People sweat for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are normal and some are not. Sweating is a natural response to physical and emotional stress. But excessive sweating, when the reason is unclear, is often a sign that something is not right. Some people with sweating conditions will sweat even on a cold day or during minimal activity. Low blood sugar levels and diabetes-related nervous system damage cause the most commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Extremely low blood sugars cause a fight-or-flight response, triggering the release of hormones that increase sweating. When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, a loss of nerve function can occur. This condition is known as diabetic neuropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) claim that around half of people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy. If the nerves that control the sweat glands are damaged, they may send the wrong message to sweat glands, or none at all. In most cases, neuropathies cause either excessive sweating or an inability to sweat. Sweating caused by hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a term to describe abnormally low blood sugar levels. For most adults, blood glucose levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter are considered hypoglycemic. Individual targets can vary, however. Many diabetes management medica Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sweating After Eating

Diabetes And Sweating After Eating

Although often ill-timed and embarrassing, sweating after eating is something diabetics can treat. This condition is called gustatory sweating, and it often involves profuse sweating on both sides of your face, scalp, neck and chest. This condition is not well understood, but investigational reports have found that a medication and a topical cream help. Ask your doctor if you need treatment. Video of the Day Scientists aren't sure why gustatory sweating happens with diabetics. But the condition has been linked to complications such as nerve and kidney damage, as well as poorly controlled blood sugar. In a "Diabetic Medicine" study, 69 percent of the diabetics who reported gustatory sweating had nephropathy, or kidney damage; 36 percent had neuropathy or nerve damage. Chewing activates the sweating, and the condition is marked by sweating about the face, scalp and neck. Some gustatory sweating is normal, especially after you eat spicy foods, but in diabetes, it's often profuse, inappropriate or unexpected sweating. The American Diabetes Association reports that cheese and chocolate are two of the most common causes of such sweating. Pickles, vinegar, fresh fruit, salty foods and alcohol may also trigger gustatory sweating. Oral medicines and roll-on ointments can be used to treat gustatory sweating in diabetes. A topical ointment called glycopyrrolate successfully stopped it in a case study reported in the "Archives of Internal Medicine." The authors reported it was safe, effective and well tolerated. A Dutch study reported in the "Netherlands Journal of Medicine" that oxybutynin, a pill, provided "striking" relief from gustatory sweating. If you seek treatment of gustatory sweating from your doctor, ask about the side effects of both of these medications. In a study pub Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Sweating Issues

Diabetes & Sweating Issues

Diabetes is a chronic disease resulting from the inability of the body to correctly regulate the levels of glucose in the blood, or blood sugar levels. People with diabetes may experience symptoms in almost any organ of the body, because blood flows through the entire body. Symptoms of diabetes include various issues concerning sweating and heat regulation. Video of the Day Although diabetes is a disease caused by high levels of blood sugar, called hyperglycemia, patients with diabetes occasionally experience the opposite problem of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. Low blood sugar in diabetic patients is most often caused by medicines used to treat high blood sugar, but sometimes they work too well and cause blood sugar to drop to unhealthy levels. When people with diabetes experience a dip in blood sugar, the body releases epinephrine, also called adrenaline, in an attempt to raise blood sugar. In addition to the symptoms of shakiness and anxiety, epinephrine also causes the body to start sweating profusely, the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse explains. Inability to Sweat One frequent effect of diabetes is damage to the nerves connecting the brain to the rest of the body, which is called diabetic neuropathy. If the nerves that control sweat glands are damaged, they may not be able to activate the sweat glands and produce sweat. This inability to sweat is called anhidrosis. One study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that 94 percent of patients with diabetic neuropathy had abnormalities in sweating. People who cannot sweat often have trouble regulating their body temperature, because sweat helps the body to cool down. As a result, diabetic patients with anhidrosis may easily become overheated in warm temperatures or after physical exertion. Some pa Continue reading >>

Sweating In Diabetes

Sweating In Diabetes

Rowan Hillson May 10, 2017 Vol 34.4 May 2017 It was hot in the Peruvian rainforest over 40C. We walked for hours looking for wildlife. That evening my clothes were wringing wet with sweat and the macaws had eaten my soap. Sweating cools our bodies. Adrenaline release causes sweating too. Most sweat is excreted from eccrine glands throughout the skin, especially on the palms, soles, and head. Sweat contains mainly water and sodium chloride, with potassium, bicarbonate, and trace components including glucose. Most of the sodium chloride is reabsorbed. Apocrine sweat glands, mainly in the axillae and anogenital area, excrete sweat containing lipids, proteins and steroids, mixed with sebum. Sweat is odourless but the action of skin bacteria makes it smell, particularly the oily apocrine sweat which may act as a pheromone. Cystic fibrosis affects over 10 000 people in the UK and is recessively inherited. Accumulated thick, sticky mucus impairs lung function and invites infection, causes malabsorption by impairing pancreatic digestive enzyme release, and leads to liver disease. About a third of people with cystic fibrosis develop diabetes. The median survival of 40 years in cystic fibrosis is reduced by having diabetes.1 Cystic fibrosis increases chloride excretion in sweat so diagnosis is by sweat testing.2 Sweating is a cardinal symptom of hypoglycaemia, due to adrenaline release as part of the counter-regulatory hormonal response to the low glucose. It is an autonomic symptom mediated by cholinergic sympathetic nerve fibres.3 A meta-analysis found that 4784% of people with diabetes experienced sweating when they were hypoglycaemic.4 People with diabetes should learn their own early warning symptoms of hypoglycaemia. I am a 71-year-old man with diabetes Ive developed a ver Continue reading >>

Excessive Sweating With Diabetes: Causes And Symptoms - Dlife

Excessive Sweating With Diabetes: Causes And Symptoms - Dlife

7 Causes of Excessive Perspiration in People with Diabetes Unless the weather is swelteringor youre having hot flashes, excessive sweating is most likely an indication of a greater health issue. Ask yourself: Do you have a fever or other signs of an infection? Does it involve your palms, soles, and/or armpits? Is your blood glucose level high (or low) during these sweating episodes? Could sweating be a reaction to your diabetes medication? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, talk to your healthcare provider. What are the possible causes of excessive sweating? For people with diabetes, certain complications can affect the sweat glands, making it difficult for the body to cool down in hot weather, triggering heavy sweating even during light activities, or causing sweating in cool temperatures. This is a condition in which hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) interferes with the nerves that control involuntary functions. The autonomic nervous system manages several systems automatically, including bladder control, heart rate, the ability to detect hypoglycemia, and the ability to sweat appropriately. Dry feet are a common symptom of nerve disease , so it is important to inspect your feet daily to be sure there are no cracks from excessive dryness, a condition that tends to occur alongwith sweating. A low blood glucose level is called hypoglycemia . Hypoglycemia triggers a fight-or-flight response in the body. As a result, the body produces additional norepinephrine and adrenaline, which can lead to heavy sweating as well as shakiness and anxiety. Good diabetes management can help keep your blood glucose levels in check. People with diabetes have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Excessive sweating can be a sign of heart failure, heart attack, or strok Continue reading >>

Is Your Excessive Sweating Caused By A Medical Problem?

Is Your Excessive Sweating Caused By A Medical Problem?

Do you sweat more than other people? Does a five-minute workout on the treadmill leave you sopping wet? Do you wipe your hand before every handshake? At the very least, excessive sweating is a hassle. But sometimes heavy sweating is sign of a medical condition. "It's not always easy for the average person to know the difference," says Benjamin Barankin, MD, a dermatologist in Toronto and a member of the American Academy of Dermatology. Excessive sweating, or hyperhidrosis, can be a warning sign of thyroid problems, diabetes or infection. Excessive sweating is also more common in people who are overweight or out of shape. The good news is that most cases of excessive sweating are harmless. If you are worried about how much you sweat, here's information to help you decide if you should see a doctor for a medical diagnosis. What Is Excessive Sweating? If you just sweat more than other people when it's hot or you're exerting yourself, that's not usually a sign of trouble. Sweating is a normal reaction when your body's working harder and needs to cool itself down. "There are natural variations in how people sweat, just as there are variations in other bodily functions," says Dee Anna Glaser, MD, vice chair of the dermatology department at St. Louis University and president of the International Hyperhidrosis Society. "Some people start sweating more easily than others." True excessive sweating goes beyond the normal physical need to sweat. If you have hyperhidrosis, you may sweat heavily for no reason -- when it's not appropriate to the circumstances. "Let's say that the temperature is mild, and you're not anxious, and you don't have a fever, and you're just watching a movie with your family," says Glaser. "If you're sitting there sweating profusely, that's not normal." Baran Continue reading >>

Why Diabetics Sweat After Eating

Why Diabetics Sweat After Eating

ByHimanshu Sharma , Onlymyhealth editorial team Sweating excessively after eating is often related to nephropathy and dysautonomia Cheese could be regarded as the most powerful stimulus among all The sweating often involves sweating of scalp, neck and chest However, profuse sweating on either sides of the face can also be seen This syndrome of diabetes sweating excessively after eating is often related to nephropathy, peripheral neuropathy and dysautonomia. Gustatory sweating, a complication of diabetes that is related to nerve damage, is indicated by sweating when one chews food. Sweating could be more around neck and chest region. Facial Sweating while Eating (Gustatory sweating) It was observed first observed in diabetics pursuing autonomic neuropathy. Gustatory sweating may be severe, which can be produced by several foodstuffs. Cheese could be regarded as the most powerful stimulus among all. The sweating often involves sweating of scalp, neck and chest along with profuse sweating on either sides of the face. The actual reason of sweating is not known, but studies indicate there is a fair chance of it being related to high blood glucose for a long time. Health experts advise medication and a topical cream help to resolve the gustatory sweating. According to the American Diabetes Association, the most common foods to cause sweating are cheese or chocolate. Spicy pickles, alcohol, vinegar, fresh fruits and salty foods can also make diabetes sweat. The International Hyperhidrosis Society refers hot spices as a trigger of gustatory sweating and recommends limiting these. Chewing is another trigger, which can make diabetes sweat around their face, scalp and neck. A report by the International Hyperhidrosis Society on gustatory sweating recommends avoiding caffeinated b Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2: Sweating Could Be Caused By Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes Type 2: Sweating Could Be Caused By Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes type 2: Sweating could be caused by low blood sugar levels Diabetes type 2: Sweating could be caused by low blood sugar levels DIABETES type 2 occurs when the body can no longer control blood sugar levels due to problems with the hormone insulin. In the hot weather sweating may occur more frequently, but can it be caused by diabetes? Diabetes type 2 can cause excessive sweating, experts have revealed. Healthline, a medical website, claimed the sweating can occur when your blood sugar levels get too low, causing hypoglycaemia. This happens without any effect from exercise or hot weather, which usually cause sweating to help reduce body temperature. The perspiration on your skin will trigger a fight or flight response from your body, added Healthline on its website. The sweating is caused by excess adrenaline and norepinephrine which is produced by the body. Diabetes type 2: Low blood sugar levels can cause you to sweat excessively The NHS said sweating is just one symptom of low blood sugar. Feeling hungry, tingling lips, shaking and trembling and a fast or pounding heartbeat are other warning signs of the condition. A low blood sugar causes different symptoms for everybody, said the NHS online. Youll learn how it makes you feel if you keep getting it, although your symptoms may change over time. Hypos can also occur while sleeping, which may wake you up during the night or cause headaches, tiredness or night sweats in the morning. Diabetes type 2: Low blood sugar levels can cause excessive sweating (Image: Getty) Diabetes type 2: Foods to lower blood sugar Diabetes type 2: Foods to lower blood sugar Diabetes type 2: Sweating caused by hypoglycaemia could be uncomfortable (Image: Getty) Healthline recommended visiting the doctor if someone experiences excessive Continue reading >>

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia can be a very serious condition, with extreme cases causing seizures, coma, and even death. It occurs when blood sugar levels drop too low, and it is most often experienced by people with diabetes. As you learn about diabetes management, being well versed in low blood sugar symptoms will enable you to detect the signs of impending hypoglycemia and act quickly to head it off or minimize its impact. Diabetes Type and Hypoglycemia Risk Hypoglycemia risk varies across the three different types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia most often, as their diabetes management often requires a lot of attention and careful planning. The average person with type 1 diabetes who is attempting aggressive disease control may still experience low blood sugar symptoms frequently, and a full-blown case of hypoglycemia will require close medical attention. "When it comes to type 1 diabetes, the body can't make insulin on its own, so it must be administered," notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, Everyday Health contributor and author of Belly Fat for Dummies. Paying close attention to your diet is important, too. "If the correct amount of insulin is given based on the amount of carbohydrates consumed, blood sugar levels can remain in a healthy range." Type 2 Diabetes These patients experience hypoglycemia less frequently than people with type 1 diabetes; the rate of hypoglycemia for type 2 diabetes patients taking insulin is about one-third that of type 1 diabetes patients. But research shows that the frequency of hypoglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes increases as the disease becomes more advanced. "In people with type 2 diabetes, the body may produce adequate insulin, yet the cells are resistant to it, making the insulin ineffecti Continue reading >>

Diabetic Night Sweats: Controlling Blood Sugar Levels At Night

Diabetic Night Sweats: Controlling Blood Sugar Levels At Night

Home / Sleep Health & Advice / Diabetes and Night Sweats Waking up at night feeling shivery and drenched in sweat is not an unusual occurrence if you suffer from diabetes. Even when the weather is cool you can find yourself clammy and unable to sleep comfortably. Youre not alone almost half of Americans are now thought to suffer with diabetes or pre-diabetes so we thought wed shed some light on the link between diabetes and night sweats, and how you can get some night sweats relief to get a better nights sleep. People with diabetes often suffer night sweats due to low blood sugar levels, or nocturnal hypoglycemia . A drop in blood glucose can cause all sorts of symptoms, including headaches and severe sweating. These symptoms of nocturnal hypoglycemia can result in disturbed sleep due to discomfort and damp bedding, and will likely mean you feel less than refreshed in the morning. So, what causes night sweats in diabetics? There are a number of things you may not realize can cause your blood glucose levels to fall during the night. Did you know that if you enjoy a glass of wine or beer before bed, you may be stopping your liver functioning to produce glucose overnight? If youve ever woken up in a cold sweat after a night out this is the cause! Exercising lots during the day can mean you use up your bodys stores of glucose if you dont replenish these before bed you could suffer from nocturnal hypoglycemia.. Did you know, if you manage your diabetes with insulin you may be more at risk of diabetic night sweats as you cant monitor your blood glucose levels at night? How to control blood sugar levels at night There are a few things you can try to reduce the risk of suffering from low blood sugar at night. The main one is to make sure you manage your diabetes as well as you Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Prevent Night Sweats

8 Ways To Prevent Night Sweats

Do you ever wake up drenched in sweat in the middle of the night—even if the thermostat is turned low? Try these diabetes-friendly ways to prevent night sweats. If you’ve ever awakened a few hours after drifting off to sleep, wrapped in damp sheets and dripping with sweat, you know how disruptive it can be to a good night’s rest. Why might your body’s own thermostat be going haywire? “Night sweats are usually related to hypoglycemia, an episode of low blood sugar,” says L.A.-based diabetes educator Lori Zanini, RD. “Other signs of nighttime hypoglycemia include waking up with a headache and having nightmares,” both caused by fitful sleep. A variety of circumstances can throw your blood sugar off balance, from injecting the incorrect amount of insulin to eating or exercising differently than usual. “Focus on preventing your nighttime lows, rather than reacting to the symptoms caused by the lows,” says Zanini. Here’s how: Eat a bedtime snack. “A protein-rich snack is absorbed and processed by the liver slowly enough to ensure blood sugar remains stable throughout the night,” says Zanini. Opt for one that contains at least 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and one to two ounces of protein. Some ideas include: ¾ cup of blueberries and ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese Slice of whole-wheat, high-fiber toast with 1 to 2 tablespoons natural peanut butter One or two servings of string cheese Ask yourself: Have I been more active today? If the answer is “yes,” be sure to adjust for the extra physical activity by snacking or taking less blood sugar-lowering medication to compensate for burning extra sugar. Avoid late-night drinking. Consuming alcohol in the evening can put you at risk for low blood sugar, since your liver is busy clearing the alcohol from Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes and Excessive Sweating While many people can experience difficulties with sweating, it can also be an issue for people with diabetes. There are three main types of sweating that you may experience. They are: hyperhidrosis: excessive sweating not caused by temperature or exercise gustatory sweating: caused by food and limited to face and neck areas night sweats: caused by low blood glucose during the night Each of these have different types of treatments. Your doctor can recommend the best treatment to help relieve or stop your excessive sweating. However, since sweating can be a sign of other more serious conditions, you should always talk to your doctor if you experience this type of sweating. Hyperhidrosis Hyperhidrosis is the term for excessive sweating. This is sweating that is not from exercising or the temperature. This can occur when your blood glucose gets too low (hypoglycemia). It will trigger a fight or flight response from your body. You produce excess adrenaline and norepinephrine, which cause excess sweating. Once your blood sugar returns to normal, the sweating should stop. If, along with sweating, you have bladder control problems or an unusual heart rate, it could indicate autonomic neuropathy. This is caused by damage to the nerves that control functions like the bladder, blood pressure, and sweating. Excessive sweating can also occur with obesity. Obesity often accompanies diabetes. However, these are not the only ways diabetes and excessive sweating can be connected. Gustatory Sweating Gustatory sweating is different than hyperhidrosis. It is also not unique to people with diabetes. However, people with diabetic autonomic neuropathy are more likely to experience this than those without nerve damage. Luckily, it is easy to identify. If you br Continue reading >>

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