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Do Diabetics Have Problems With Their Teeth?

Diabetes And Your Gums

Diabetes And Your Gums

After five years of writing about diabetes, I still think gum care is among the most important and least appreciated aspects of self-management. Studies keep showing how gum (periodontal) disease and diabetes make each other worse. So are you flossing yet? Severe gum disease (periodontitis) can cause diabetes. According to researchers at Marquette University, “Periodontitis may [raise levels of inflammatory cytokines and serum lipids]… These cytokines can produce an insulin resistance syndrome similar to that observed in diabetes and initiate destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to development of diabetes.” Just as gum disease contributes to diabetes, having diabetes worsens gum conditions. According to the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP), “Periodontal disease is often considered the sixth complication of diabetes. Those people who don’t have their diabetes under control are especially at risk.” The link between diabetes and gum disease is that both cause inflammation, not just locally, but through the whole body. Inflammatory cytokines like interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inflame blood vessels, creating small scars. Soon the vessels block up with plaque. These blockage are linked with heart disease, kidney disease, and strokes, all major complications of diabetes. A study from Bangalore, India looked at 200 people, half of whom had recent strokes or heart attacks. Researchers controlled for family history of stroke, diet, smoking and alcohol consumption, diabetes, hypertension, total serum cholesterol level, and education level. Those with worse gums (pocket depths greater than 4.5 millimeters) had far higher risk of strokes. Along with inflammation, infection of the gums creates a vicious diabetes circle. Gum infection Continue reading >>

Diabetics With Dental Problems In Tulsa – How Diabetes Affects Your Teeth And Gums

Diabetics With Dental Problems In Tulsa – How Diabetes Affects Your Teeth And Gums

The Perfect Smile Tulsa can answer your questions about how diabetes affects teeth and gums and why diabetics are at a higher risk for dental problems. Most diabetics know that when diabetes is poorly controlled, they can eventually have problems with their extremities, particularly toes and feet. But few realize that diabetics are also at a higher risk for dental problems. How Diabetes Affects Your Teeth and Gums It’s important to keep your regular checkups at the Perfect Smile Tulsa. We all know dental problems can occur to anyone. That’s why it’s recommended to see your dentist on a regular basis. Plaque builds up on all of our teeth. However, high blood glucose levels help germs to build up on your teeth and gums, making these problems worse so that you could actually loose your teeth. What does this look like if it’s happening to you? The first signs are red, sore, and bleeding gums. This can lead to periodontitis, which is an infection in the gums and the bone that holds the teeth in place. Pockets form between the teeth, which fill with germs and pus. If not treated and the infection gets worse, your gums may pull away from your teeth, making the teeth look very long, and your teeth will loosen. It may seem that diabetics are singled out for many diseases, but with gum disease about 85% of all adults develop it. 10% have lost all of their teeth to it. It is difficult to get people to brush and floss as often as they should. Many people do not go to the dentist when their gums bleed when they brush or floss. This bleeding is not normal. It needs to be addressed. If the plaque is not brushed and flossed away it hardens into tartar and collects under the gum line. To make matters worse, more plaque forms over the tartar, so you can imagine how the problem ca Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Did you know that trouble keeping your blood sugars in control could lead to an infection? That infection could be in your gums. That’s right. People with diabetes have a higher incidence of gum disease or periodontal disease than people without diabetes. In this article, we will look at the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. We will look at what it is, what are the prevention and treatment options available, some other oral problems that are also linked to diabetes, and more. Just like high blood glucose makes it easier for you to get an infection in other places in your body, high blood glucose levels also make it easier to get a gum infection, or other infection in your mouth. Decaying teeth and poor oral habits contribute to periodontal disease, as does smoking. We will take a look at all of that here. First, let’s see why Martin contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Martin was interested in learning more about his high blood sugars and their effects on his teeth. He had been trying to get his blood sugar levels down, but nothing he seemed to do with diet, exercise, or medications helped in aiming his target range for blood sugars or in an A1C range that he was comfortable with. He was due to pay a visit to his dentist since his last visit was over a year ago. Martin’s dentist told him that he was at the start of a periodontal disease, and in addition, he had a gum infection. He wondered if the infection in his gums may be a reason for why he was unable to keep his blood glucose in a good range. An infection anywhere in your body could be a reason for unruly blood glucose. Let’s see if we can answer Martin’s question in depth. What is periodontal disease? Periodontal disease is an infection that develops of the gum, and underlying bone, that holds the Continue reading >>

7 Signs Of Disease Your Teeth Can Reveal

7 Signs Of Disease Your Teeth Can Reveal

You may have type 2 diabetes istock/FangXiaNuo Red, swollen gums that may bleed are the hallmarks of periodontal disease—an incredibly common condition that affects more than 47 percent of Americans 30 and older and more than 70 percent of adults 65 and older, according to the CDC. Periodontal disease is brought on by bacteria in the mouth that infect the tissues and create plaque. "Diabetes makes periodontal disease worse," says Paulo Camargo, DDS, professor of periodontics and associate dean for clinical dental sciences at UCLA School of Dentistry. "Periodontal disease can also make the blood sugar more difficult to control." Research shows that diabetes is a major risk factor for periodontitis, a more serious form of periodontal disease that can damage soft tissues and destroy the bone that supports teeth. In fact, people with diabetes are three times more susceptible to developing periodontitis than those who aren't diabetic. "If gums bleed a lot and are swollen or the patient is having frequent abscesses or infections, the dentist might start to question if you have a family history of diabetes," says Sally Cram, DDS, a periodontist in Washington, DC, and a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. Diabetes isn't the only health problem associated with periodontal disease: The disease, which triggers a harmful, inflammatory response, is also linked to a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. These are other type 2 diabetes symptoms you shouldn’t ignore. istock/stevanovicigor Eating garlic knots and forgetting to brush your tongue aren't the only causes of bad breath. In some cases, especially if you already have a solid brushing and flossing regimen in place, a lingering case of halitosis can signal a health problem, such as gastroesophageal reflux dis Continue reading >>

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that can affect the whole body — your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart, and other important systems in the body. It can also affect your mouth. People with diabetes face a higher than normal risk of oral health problems. Why are people with diabetes more likely to develop oral health problems? The link between diabetes and oral health problems is high blood sugar. If blood sugar is poorly controlled, oral health problems are more likely to develop. This is because uncontrolled diabetes weakens white blood cells, which are the body's main defense against bacterial infections that can occur in the mouth. Just as studies have shown that controlling blood sugar levels lowers the risk of major organ complications of diabetes — such as eye, heart, and nerve damage — so to can diabetes control protect against the development of oral health problems. Specifically, what are some of these oral health problems? People with diabetes face a higher risk of: Dry mouth — Uncontrolled diabetes can decrease saliva flow, resulting in dry mouth. Dry mouth can further lead to soreness, ulcers, infections, and tooth decay. Gum inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontitis — Besides weakening white blood cells, another complication of diabetes is that it causes blood vessels to thicken. This slows the flow of nutrients to and waste products from body tissues, including the mouth. When this combination of events, the body loses its ability to fight infections. Since periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, people with uncontrolled diabetes might experience more frequent and more severe gum disease. Poor healing of oral tissues — People with uncontrolled diabetes do not heal quickly after oral surgery or other dental procedures because blood flow to the treatmen Continue reading >>

Medical Conditions

Medical Conditions

It’s important to realize that your dentist sees much more than just your teeth! Some health-related conditions that show up in the mouth include: temporomandibular disorder (TMD) HIV/AIDS thyroid problems iron deficiency/anemia leukemia eating disorders (bulimia and anorexia) Communication with your dentist is vital. During your visit, talk to your dentist about your ongoing health concerns so that he or she may help you. Your dentist may adjust your treatment if you have certain medical conditions, use certain prescription drugs or are currently undergoing medical treatment, such as radiation or chemotherapy. Diabetes Research shows that gum disease and diabetes may affect one another. For instance, gum disease can intensify the complications associated with diabetes by increasing blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels over an extended period of time are associated with premature degeneration of eyes, kidneys, nerves and blood vessels. Studies have also shown that people with diabetes face a greater risk of developing oral infections and gum disease than those who do not have diabetes. The good news is that the treatment of either gum disease or diabetes can lead to improvements in the other. Your dentist has the training and experience necessary to assess your oral health, and to determine a course of treatment that is best for you. Some of the most common oral health problems associated with diabetes are: tooth decay gum disease dry mouth fungal infections lesions in the mouth taste impairment infection and delayed healing If you are a diabetic, speak to your dentist about the best course of treatment for you. Make sure to let him or her know: if the diabetes is under control if you take insulin and when your last usual dose of insulin was administered if the Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Teeth?

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Teeth?

It is important to take good care of your teeth when you have diabetes. Did you know that people with diabetes are more likely to have problems with their teeth and gums? The good news is that you can take steps to help keep your teeth healthy. By reading through the information and tips in this blog, you will be well on your way to understanding more about Diabetes and Oral Health Problems and why Healthy Teeth Matter! Oral Diseases Oral diseases such as dental decay (cavities), gingivitis (bleeding gums), and periodontal disease (gum disease) are all contagious diseases. Each of them are caused by a certain germ just like the common cold and flu and can be passed from person to person. The germs that cause dental diseases can be spread from person to person via affectionate contact such as kissing, or sharing of toothbrushes, food, eating utensils or drinks. Plaque is the main cause of gum disease, but diabetes can also be a culprit because it may weaken your mouth’s germ-fighting powers. High blood glucose levels can make gum disease worse, and at the same time, gum disease can make diabetes harder to control. Often gum disease is painless. You may not even know you have it until it causes serious damage. Regular dentist visits are the best option for prevention. While gum disease may not hurt, there are warning signs to watch for. Bleeding gums when you brush or floss. This bleeding is not normal. Even if your gums don’t hurt, get them checked. Red, swollen or tender gums Gums that have pulled away from teeth. Part of the tooth’s root may show, or your teeth may look longer. Pus between the teeth and gums (when you press on the gums) Bad breath Permanent teeth that are loose or moving away from each other Changes in the way your teeth fit when you bite Changes Continue reading >>

Diet, Diabetes And Tooth Decay

Diet, Diabetes And Tooth Decay

If you are one of the 16 million Americans with diabetes, you're probably aware that the disease can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. What you may not know is that diabetics are more susceptible to developing oral infections and gum (periodontal) disease than those who do not have diabetes. Diet and tooth decay Your teeth are covered with plaque, a sticky film of bacteria. After you have a meal, snack or beverage that contains sugars or starches, the bacteria release acids that attack tooth enamel. Repeated attacks can cause the enamel to break down and may eventually result in cavities. When diabetes is not controlled properly, high glucose levels in saliva may help bacteria and plaque thrive. Plaque that is not removed can eventually harden into tartar. When tartar collects on your teeth, it makes a thorough cleaning of your teeth more difficult. This can create conditions that lead to chronic inflammation and infection in the mouth. Diabetes lowers your resistance to infection and can slow the healing process. What you can do Reduce or eliminate sugars and starches from your diet, eat healthy foods and exercise regularly. Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and clean once a day between your teeth with floss or an interdental cleaner to remove decay-causing plaque. Keep teeth and gums strong by keeping track of blood sugar levels. Also, have your triglycerides and cholesterol levels monitored. Treat dental infections immediately. Diabetics who combine good dental care with insulin control typically have a better chance of avoiding gum disease. Provide your medical and oral health histories to both your medical and dental care providers. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

What do brushing and flossing have to do with diabetes? Plenty. If you have diabetes, here's why dental care matters — and how to take care of your teeth and gums. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar can take a toll on your entire body — including your teeth and gums. The good news? Prevention is in your hands. Learn what you're up against, and then take charge of your dental health. Cavities and gum disease Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, managing your blood sugar level is key. The higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk of: Tooth decay (cavities). Your mouth naturally contains many types of bacteria. When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with these bacteria, a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth. The acids in plaque attack the surfaces of your teeth (enamel and dentin). This can lead to cavities. The higher your blood sugar level, the greater the supply of sugars and starches — and the more acid wearing away at your teeth. Early gum disease (gingivitis). Diabetes reduces your ability to fight bacteria. If you don't remove plaque with regular brushing and flossing, it'll harden under your gumline into a substance called tartar (calculus). The longer plaque and tartar remain on your teeth, the more they irritate the gingiva — the part of your gums around the base of your teeth. In time, your gums become swollen and bleed easily. This is gingivitis. Advanced gum disease (periodontitis). Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to a more serious infection called periodontitis, which destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth. Eventually, periodontitis causes your gums and jawbone to pull away from your teeth, which in turn causes your teeth to loosen and possibly fall out. Periodontitis Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes: Teeth And Gum Problems To Be Aware Of

Living With Diabetes: Teeth And Gum Problems To Be Aware Of

New research reported in HealthDay News says that one in five people who suffer from gum disease are also type-2 diabetics. The severe gum disease caused by diabetes is called periodontitis. This disease causes gum infections that result in swollen gums and deterioration of the bones that support your teeth. If you have diabetes, it's harder to fight off infections and inflammation, so daily brushing and flossing is critical for a healthy mouth. Signs of Poor Oral Health Fruit-like odor from mouth Inflamed gums Receding gums Bleeding gums Painful chewing How Gum Disease Can Lead to Other Health Problems The reason gum disease is such a problem for diabetics is that their blood sugar levels are often high. This causes sugar to appear in saliva, as well. The sugar is a breeding ground for bacteria, which causes gum disease. For diabetics, gum disease can lead to other health problems like heart disease, risk of stroke and respiratory diseases. The reason this happens is if it hurts to chew, your food choices are limited. This results in poor nutrition that often leads to erratic blood glucose levels. Good Oral Hygiene Tips for Diabetics According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, getting gum disease under control can actually lower blood sugar for people with type 2 diabetes. Follow these simple oral hygiene tips to help you lower your risk of gum disease: Work with your doctor to regulate your blood sugar. Make sure you brush and floss every day. Let your dentist know if you're diabetic. Visit your dentist every six months. If you notice swollen gums, consult your dentist. Quit smoking if you're a smoker. Dr. JoAnn Gurenlien of the American Dental Hygienist's Association recommends that anyone with diabetes should visit the dentist twice per year, as wel Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you hav Continue reading >>

Dental Care Tips For Those With Diabetes

Dental Care Tips For Those With Diabetes

Poor dental hygiene can cause a host of problems; missing teeth, sensitivity, gum disease, dry mouth and oropharyngeal cancer are all potential issues when people fail to take care of their teeth. Now while all of these are scary, with a little work, they can be managed and will cause most people only minor problems. However, throw diabetes into the mix and it is much more serious, as well as much more difficult to manage. What is Diabetes? Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, is a metabolic disease that causes a person to have high levels of glucose in their blood. This can happen because of inadequate insulin production, or because the body’s cells do not process insulin properly. It is a long term condition, and as of today, there is no cure. Symptoms include frequent urination, intense thirst, unusual weight gain or loss, fatigue and bruises that do not heal. It is this last symptom that causes such great concern for dentists. Blood circulation can be compromised, which causes wounds to heal more slowly. What dental problems do dentist see in their diabetic patients? Diabetics have the same problems as non-diabetics; the concern dentists have is that their problems can lead to very severe consequences. A few of the most serious concerns are: • Gum Disease: The most common problem dentists see in their diabetic patients is gum disease. In fact, there is a much higher prevalence of gum disease in diabetics than in the population at large. • Slow healing: when blood sugar is high, wounds take much longer to heal; this means that invasive dental work must be monitored closely to ensure patient’s work heals completely. • Infections: people with badly controlled diabetes are much more susceptible to infections, especially if the wound doesn’t heal properly. If the Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose & Your Teeth

Blood Glucose & Your Teeth

"People with diabetes who keep their blood glucose levels in a target range have no more dental problems than the rest of the population," says Dr. Carol Alexopoulos, a dentist who practices in Toronto, Ontario. "However, those with poorly managed blood glucose levels have a decrease in saliva and an increase in salivary sugar, which leads to dry mouth, ulcers, fungal infections, increased tooth decay, loss of teeth, and difficulty wearing dentures,” explains Dr. Alexopoulos. Insufficient moisture can cause both dry mouth and a burning sensation on your tongue. This lack of moisture can eventually lead to an irritation of the entire lining of the mouth, since normal volumes of saliva actually protect your teeth from cavities and make chewing and speech comfortable. If you wear dentures and develop a feeling of dry mouth, you may find them irritating and more difficult to wear. In addition, poorly managed blood glucose (sugar) levels can lead to: Severe toothaches due to impaired circulation to your teeth. If you cannot eat solid food because chewing is difficult, try alternatives such as milk, soup, cereals, pudding, or fruit juices to replace your carbohydrate allowance. More severe gum disease and at an earlier age. Thickening of the small blood vessels of the gingiva (gums) which can lead to infection of the gum and bone tissues. Periodontal disease that, in turn, can make it hard to manage blood glucose (sugar) levels. Because periodontal disease is an infection, bacteria produce toxins that affect the carbohydrate metabolism in individual cells. It is also thought that the host response to periodontal bacteria can increase insulin resistance and, therefore, blood glucose (sugar) levels. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

Resize font A- A A+ Diabetes and Oral Health During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.1 What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a serious disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other foods into energy. Normally, insulin helps get sugar from the blood to the body's cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble making and/or using insulin, so your body does not get the fuel it needs and your blood sugar stays too high. High blood sugar sets off processes that can lead to complications, such as heart, kidney, and eye disease, or other serious problems.2,3 If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease. Are There Different Types of Diabetes? It is estimated that more than 20 million adults and children in the United States have some form of diabetes–14 million having been diagnosed with the disease and 6 million being unaware they have it. There are different types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Most Americans (around 90%) who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.2,3 What Is Periodontal Disease? Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection of the gums, ligaments, and bone that support your teeth and hold them in the jaw. If left untreated, you may experience tooth loss. The main cause of periodontal disease is bacterial Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Cause Problems With My Teeth And Gums?

How Does Diabetes Cause Problems With My Teeth And Gums?

People with diabetes are at an increased risk for gum disease. It is very important to visit your dental office at least twice a year (or more if recommended) for a dental exam and professional cleaning. You should also practice meticulous home care -- brushing twice daily and cleaning between your teeth once a day. One product that has been tested on people with diabetes and found to really help reduce bleeding and gingivitis is the Water Flosser. It has also been shown to be as effective as string dental floss. If you have diabetes, you are at greater risk of developing some oral health problems. Because of lowered resistance and a longer healing process, gum disease appears to be more frequent and more severe among those with diabetes. Gum disease is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. See your dentist if you suspect you have gum disease because the sooner you treat it the better. When you have poorly managed blood glucose levels, it can increase the risk of problems with your teeth and gums. Also, a dry mouth is more common in diabetics and can increase the risk of tooth decay. Gingivitis (gum disease) and periodontitis (severe gum disease) can happen to anyone, but having diabetes increases the risk of these oral health problems. High blood sugar worsens dental problems with diabetes. If you smoke and have diabetes, you may develop a more serious form of gum disease. If you have diabetes, see your dentist for a thorough evaluation and then follow up daily with brushing, flossing and excellent oral home care. Continue Learning about Diabetes and Oral Health Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treat Continue reading >>

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