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Do Diabetics Get Sleepy After Eating Sugar?

Feeling Tired After Eating Sugar

Feeling Tired After Eating Sugar

You would be amazed to know that all the food that you eat has high sugar content, if you were not buying sugar-free products. Popping these stuffs would provide you with an instant burst of energy, but on the other hand, this instant burst would die soon. Consuming sugar increases the metabolism of the body, and hence you feel sleepy and tired. Although medical practitioners and researchers have always condemned the use of excessive sugar, there are very few people who understand the reason behind it. People usually think that consuming sugar would provide them with instant energy. This however is not true. You might feel energetic for sometime after having sugar because of the increased metabolism, but as soon as the sugar is burnt you start feeling tired and sleepy. Researchers have a lot to say on this topic. One of the main reasons as to why you feel tired is explained below. When you consume sugar or product containing a high amount of sugar, then it causes an increase in the blood sugar levels. The increase in the blood sugar level results the release of insulin from the pancreas, which would result in sudden decrease of the blood sugar levels. This sudden diminishing of the levels makes you feel sleepy and tired. This can also result in cravings in your body as it tries to recover from this sudden change. The sluggishness caused as a result of sugar consumption can also be attributed to sugar sensitivity. This is caused when you have an increased blood sugar level because of low serotonin and low beta-endorphin. Both beta-endorphin and serotonin are chemicals that are found in the brain. When the level of serotonin is low, then you will experience fatigue, and at times would be unable to focus on issues. If the level of beta-endorphin falls, then it can result i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Common symptoms of low blood sugar are: Feeling dizzy, shaky, or lightheaded Feeling nervous or anxious Having a fast heart beat Sweating Continue reading >>

Diabetes Warning Signs

Diabetes Warning Signs

Because type 2 diabetes can lead to serious health complications, it's important to be aware of any diabetes warning signs and get tested for diabetes if you have any of these symptoms. Treating diabetes early can help prevent serious complications. We'll explain the various diabetes warning signs and also warning signs of specific diabetes problems. Discover why it's important to listen to your body and alert your doctor if you notice any new signs or problems. Sometimes type 2 diabetes can develop without any warnings signs. In fact, about a third of all people who have type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. That's why it's important to talk to your doctor about your risk for diabetes and determine if you should be tested. Common warnings signs of diabetes include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) If you have any of the above mentioned warnings signs of diabetes, give your doctor a call and schedule a diabetes test. With the right diabetes diet, regular exercise, and medications, if needed, you can manage type 2 diabetes and live an active, productive life. If you have symptoms of the following diabetes complications, it's important to seek immediate medical attention. Each brief discussion links to more in-depth information. As you'll learn in this health topic, hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when the level of sugar or glucose in the blood drops too low to fuel the body. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a condition that results from a variety of causes. Hypoglycemia is most commonly a complication of diabetes treatment (diabetic hypoglycemia). You can develop hypoglycemia by taking too much insulin or other diabetes medications or Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

What exactly is fatigue? Is it just being tired after working a long week or not getting enough sleep? The answer is no. Fatigue is excessive tiredness that makes carrying out simple tasks difficult and interferes with one or more life functions. Sounds terrible, doesn’t it? Well imagine having a chronic illness along with the fatigue. Diabetes and fatigue have a strong relationship, and it can make a person’s life very difficult. The following article will discuss the relationship, along with ways to beat and reduce the risk of living with diabetes and fatigue. What is diabetes fatigue? As it was mentioned above, diabetes fatigue is an extreme tiredness that individuals with diabetes can experience. It is a tiredness that disrupts a person’s life and makes it difficult to function. It is very common, and studies have shown that 85% of those with diabetes experience fatigue. Some signs of fatigue include: Dizziness Irritability Headache Inability to concentrate Problems remembering things Blurry vision Slowed reflexes and muscle weakness Is feeling fatigue a sign/symptom of diabetes? Feeling fatigued is definitely a symptom of diabetes. However, fatigue can also be a sign or symptom of many other diseases, so it is important that you talk to your doctor about any problems that you are having. I advise reading the following: Reactive hypoglycemia, a term used to define the crash that a person gets after eating a lot of sugar and carbs, can be an early sign of diabetes. In order for the body to use the sugars and carbs that are consumed for fuel, each molecule must be paired with insulin to get into the cell. If there isn’t enough insulin available, then the sugar molecules stay in the bloodstream and cause high blood sugar. What happens is that over time, eating Continue reading >>

Here's Why Eating Too Much Can Give You A 'food Coma'

Here's Why Eating Too Much Can Give You A 'food Coma'

This article was written by Angus Stewart from Edith Cowan University and was originally published by The Conversation. We’ve all done it, enjoyed a delicious meal only to nod off in a comfy chair for a while. For some of us, this is just a habit. But for others, it’s unavoidable. So what is it about food that can make us so sleepy? When we’re eating, the stomach is producing gastrin, a hormone that promotes the secretion of digestive juices. As the food enters the small intestine, the cells in the gut secrete even more hormones (enterogastrone) that signal other bodily functions, including blood flow regulation. But what does this have to do with sleepiness? Well, as we’re digesting our meal, more of our blood is shunted to the stomach and gut, to transport away the absorbed newly digested metabolites. This leaves less blood for the rest of the body and can cause some people to feel a bit 'light-headed' or tired. Still, the body is a lot more sophisticated than that; it doesn’t respond to food volume alone. What you eat is just as important as the size of your meal. For many years now, researchers have been investigating the link between food and sleepiness, but from another perspective. If we understand more about people’s sleep patterns, we might gain insight into what causes some people to put on weight and develop diseases such diabetes and atherosclerosis (a disease of the arteries that develops with fat deposits in artery walls). We’ve known for many years that meals with an imbalance of nutrients - that are rich in either fats or carbohydrates - are associated with feeling sleepy. But this is not the case when nutrients are balanced or the meal is rich in protein. And that leads to the burning question: what is causing this effect? Scientists in Ge Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

Fatigue is one of the most common disabling diabetes symptoms. Diabetes fatigue can disrupt and interfere with all aspects of daily living. What causes diabetes fatigue, and why is it so common? We’ve written about fatigue before and received tons of great comments on those posts. But this time let’s go deeper and find the whole range of causes and solutions, even if it takes a few weeks. Hopefully, everyone will find something that might help them, because this is a serious problem. For example, Melanie wrote, “[Fatigue] really takes a toll on my family and things we can do. I just want to have the energy to play with my son and to do things around the house or with friends…I can’t drive more than 30 minutes because my husband is afraid I will fall asleep…and wreck [the car]. (I have dozed while driving before.)” Maria commented, “Fatigue is a constant and I have had to learn to do only what I can. I don’t push myself anymore as I pay for it dearly. I get tired of explaining why I don’t feel good, don’t want to do anything. Some understand and some don’t.” And Jan wrote, “I sleep from midnight to noon each day. Then I get depressed because I wasted half a day.” Because of my multiple sclerosis (MS), I live with fatigue sometimes, and I know how limiting it is. I know how difficult it can be to manage. There are more than 15 known causes for fatigue. It helps to figure out what is causing yours, so you can address it. Here are some possibilities. First, diabetes can directly cause fatigue with high or low blood sugar levels. • High blood glucose makes your blood “sludgy,” slowing circulation so cells can’t get the oxygen and nutrients they need. Margaret commented, “I can tell if my sugars are high in the morning, because ‘grogg Continue reading >>

Fatigue After Eating: It’s Not As Natural As You Think

Fatigue After Eating: It’s Not As Natural As You Think

For millions of people, fatigue that occurs after a meal may seem to be of no concern. After all, there are few people who haven’t experienced the affects of that wave of tiredness that often washes over the body after consuming a large meal. The thing is, though, that this is not how the body is supposed to work! In fact, the consumption of food should have the effect of supplying the body with the nutrients it needs to create energy. You should feel revitalized and more energetic after a meal. The problem many people fail to understand is that this fatigue can be the sign of a more serious issue when it occurs on a more frequent basis. And, as every fatigue sufferer knows all too well, the type of complete exhaustion experienced by these patients can make it difficult to manage even the most mundane tasks in life. Since no one can survive without eating, this is one type of fatigue that simply cannot be ignored. The good news is that fatigue after a meal can be addressed in a healthy and proactive way, but only when you recognize what is happening to your body and why. That’s why it is important to learn to identify the symptoms of fatigue after eating, the potential reasons why it is occurring, and the best steps for resolving the issue. Symptoms of Fatigue after Eating Fatigue after eating is more than just that feeling of lethargy that many people experience when they eat things like turkey – especially in large quantities. Extreme fatigue involves other symptoms as well, and it is the combination of these symptoms that can prove so problematic for fatigue sufferers. Common fatigue symptoms can include the following: An extended period of extreme lethargy Problems focusing on tasks or concentrating Diminished motivation General lack of physical and mental ene Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Why Do I Feel Tired After Eating?

Why Do I Feel Tired After Eating?

We’ve all felt it — that drowsy feeling that sneaks in after a meal. You’re full and relaxed, and you’re struggling to keep your eyes open. Why are meals so often followed by a sudden urge to take a nap, and should you be concerned about it? In general, a little bit of sleepiness after eating is completely normal and nothing to worry about. There are several factors that contribute to this post-meal phenomenon, and there are a few things you might be able to do to minimize those drowsy effects. Your Digestion Cycle Your body needs energy to function — not just to run after your dog or put in time at the gym — but to breathe and simply exist. We get this energy from our food, which is broken down into fuel, or glucose, by our digestive system, and then macronutrients provide calories, or energy, to our bodies. More than just changing food into energy, our digestive cycle triggers all kinds of responses within our body. Hormones such as cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon, and amylin are released to increase satiety, blood sugar rises, and insulin is produced to allow this sugar to go from the blood and into the cells, where it is used for energy. Interestingly, there are also hormones that can increase in the brain, such as serotonin, that can lead to drowsiness. Melatonin, the other hormone that induces sleep, is not released due to eating, but food does influence melatonin production. Your Diet Though all foods are digested in much the same manner, not all foods affect your body in the same way. Some foods, like turkey, can make you sleepier than others. Turkey and other high-protein foods, along with spinach, soy, eggs, cheese, tofu, and fish contain the amino acid tryptophan, which is used by the body to create serotonin, possibly responsible for that post-me Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance: Tired After Lunch?

Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance: Tired After Lunch?

When the clock strikes 2:00 in the afternoon, does fatigue drop on you like a heavy load? The time frame over the couple hours after lunch can send the best of us down for the count. If you notice that you are so exhausted you want to curl up and take nap after your midday meal, you may be experiencing your blood sugar levels shifting. For many people, eating a higher carbohydrate meal, like a sub sandwich or a pasta dish, or even sushi can really knock the wind out of their sails, because their blood sugar will spike and then drop after the body releases insulin. If you find that you are tired almost every day around the same time after lunch, then you may be experiencing a symptom of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a condition where your body doesn't process carbohydrates and sugars like it is supposed to. Insulin is a fat-storing hormone, and insulin resistance simply means your cells don't respond like they should to this hormone. Insulin is the key that unlocks the cell door to let glucose inside. With insulin resistance, the insulin key isn't fitting properly and so your body will store the glucose that cannot get inside cells as fat. This condition of insulin resistance can make it extremely difficult to lose weight, and insulin causes your body to become very eager to store fat. People can have varying degrees of insulin resistance, some more severe than others. When you have insulin resistance for a long time, it almost always leads to type 2 diabetes. The good news is, insulin resistance is easily reversible with the right type of meal plan and nutrition. At Cederquist Medical Wellness Center, we can determine the level of your insulin resistance, and formulate a customized program to first help reverse your insulin resistance, and second, to help yo Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Wednesdays, it's Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society. Asked by Mike from Tennessee Can diabetes be a (possible) cause of fatigue, leg and lower back aches? I have had bursts of energy for 10 to 15 minutes, but then need to sit for about 10 minutes, and I'm ready to go full steam again. PLEASE, Thank You, Mike Expert answer Dear Mike: Thanks for an important question, as a lot of people with diabetes complain of these symptoms. The answer is that diabetes itself probably is not the cause of your fatigue, lower back and leg aches. The things that cause type 2 diabetes (also called adult onset diabetes), such as a weight problem and lack of exercise, are commonly the cause these symptoms. Fatigue incorporates three components: 1. The inability to initiate activity. 2. Reduced ability to maintain activity. 3. Difficulty with concentration and memory. Fatigue should be distinguished from sleepiness, shortness of breath on exertion and muscle weakness, although these can also be associated with fatigue. Fatigue lasting six months or more is referred to as chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue is not necessarily the entity known as chronic fatigue syndrome, which is a diagnosis after exclusion of all other causes. Fatigue in anyone should be evaluated by a health care provider to exclude all possible causes and to get counseling on how to treat it. Other medical causes of fatigue are the side effect of drugs, thyroid dysfunction, high calcium levels, rheumatologic illnesses, adrenal, kidney or liver problems. Some infections such as tuberculosis or hepatitis can cause fatigue, and indeed, fatigue can be their only symptom. Depression is also a major cause of fatigue. While unus Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance?

What Is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin resistance is a condition that develops when the body cannot use insulin properly, which, over time, causes the development of chronic diseases of aging. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps the body use glucose (a form of sugar that is the body’s main source of energy). Our digestive system breaks food down into glucose, which then travels through bloodstream to cells throughout the body. Glucose in the blood is called blood glucose, also known as blood sugar. As the blood glucose level rises after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin to help cells take in and use the glucose. When people are insulin resistant, their muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin. As a result, their bodies need more insulin to help glucose enter cells. The pancreas tries to keep up with this increased demand for insulin by producing more. Eventually, the pancreas fails to keep up with the body’s need for insulin and excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream. This blood sugar disregulation contributes to obesity, cholesterol abnormalities, elevated blood pressure (hypertension), osteoporosis, cancer, and ultimately the development of Type 2 diabetes (also called adult-onset diabetes) and cardiovascular disease (heart attack/stroke). Therefore, controlling your insulin levels is one of the most powerful strategies you can possibly implement. Symptoms of Insulin Resistance Fatigue The most common feature of Insulin Resistance is that it wears people out; some are tired just in the morning or afternoon, others are exhausted all day. Brain fogginess Sometimes the fatigue of Insulin Resistance is physical, but often it’s mental. The inability to focus is the most evident symptom. Poor memory, loss of creativity, poor grades in school often acco Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Lots of people wonder if they have hypoglycemia (pronounced: hy-po-gly-SEE-mee-uh), but the condition is not at all common in teens. Teens who do have hypoglycemia usually have it as part of another health condition, such as diabetes. Hypoglycemia happens when a person's blood sugar levels are abnormally low, and it's a potentially serious condition. If you know someone who has diabetes, you may have heard them talk about "insulin shock," which is the common name for a severe hypoglycemic reaction. The body's most important fuel is glucose, a type of sugar. When you digest most foods, sugar is released, and that sugar ends up in your bloodstream as glucose. Your body, particularly your brain and nervous system, needs a certain level of glucose to function — not too much, and not too little. If your blood glucose level isn't right, your body will react by showing certain symptoms. People with diabetes may experience hypoglycemia if they don't eat enough or if they take too much insulin — the medicine most commonly used to treat diabetes. What Are the Symptoms? Some symptoms of hypoglycemia are caused when the body releases extra adrenaline (epinephrine), a hormone that raises blood sugar levels, into the bloodstream to protect against hypoglycemia. High blood levels of adrenaline can make the skin become pale and sweaty, and a person can also have symptoms such as shakiness, anxiety, and heart palpitations (a fast, pounding heartbeat). Other symptoms of hypoglycemia are caused when not enough glucose gets to the brain; in fact, the brain is the organ that suffers most significantly and most rapidly when there's a drop in blood sugar. These symptoms include headache, extreme hunger, blurry or double vision, fatigue, and weakness. At its most severe, insufficient gluco Continue reading >>

Why Do I Get So Tired After Eating Sweets?

Why Do I Get So Tired After Eating Sweets?

Many people feel so tired after eating cake or cookies they have to lie down. That's because sugar wreaks havoc on your metabolism, quickly raising your blood glucose (sugar) levels and, in turn, forcing your pancreas to release insulin. The insulin then lowers your blood sugar levels quickly, which makes you feel tired. What Makes Food Sweet Causes If you consistently get tired after eating high-carbohydrate foods--not just sweets but also pasta, potatoes and other foods that are metabolized into glucose (sugar) by your digestive system--your body is probably having trouble keeping your blood sugar levels even. If you get tired after eating food that has artificial sweeteners in it, your body, thinking it is about to get a lot of sugar, might be increasing your level of insulin, which makes you hungry and lowers your blood-sugar levels, making you tired. Effects of Food on Blood Sugar When you eat, your body converts the food into glucose. This raises your "blood sugar" levels (the amount of glucose in your system). In response, your pancreas releases insulin to help your cells keep their glucose levels within a safe range. Glycemic Index Foods that greatly and rapidly raise your blood sugar levels--such as sugary sweets, white bread, pasta, corn and white potatoes--are said to be high on the "glycemic index." They make your blood sugar levels "spike." Foods that raise your blood sugar level less or more slowly, such as whole grains, vegetables and proteins are low on the glycemic index. Prevention/Solution You can prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels by sticking to a diet consisting mainly of low-carbohydrate, low-glycemic foods such as fish, meat, fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Avoid foods with sugar and artificial sweeteners, both of which can cause quick Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Risk Factors

Prediabetes Risk Factors

Incredibly, one in four Americans over age 20 has prediabetes -- and most don't even know it. Being prediabetic means that your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but short of being classified as diabetic levels. Studies show that most people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years, unless they lose weight and make dietary and exercise changes. Because prediabetes develops gradually over years, it's often said that there are no obvious symptoms. But it's possible to notice certain warning signs of growing insulin resistance, the inability to process the energy in food properly that's a key aspect of prediabetes, says Beth Reardon, director of nutrition for Duke Integrative Medicine at Duke University. Paying close attention to such warning signs gives you plenty of time to make changes before the situation progresses to type 2 diabetes, she says. "These symptoms usually occur in tandem with one another; together they create a bigger picture that says insulin resistance is going on," Reardon says. "Some signs can be measured, some we feel, some we can just see." If you're experiencing the following signs, you should ask your doctor about an insulin response test to measure your insulin and blood sugar levels. If the tests confirm that your body is starting to have trouble managing its glucose, it may be incentive for you to commit to the diet and exercise changes that can help move you away from the path toward diabetes. What Feeling Tired and Sluggish After Eating Might Mean Ready to nap right after a big meal? This is a normal response to an influx of carbs (think of that post-Thanksgiving dinner feeling). But if it happens often, your body may be sending a message that your diet is too diabetes-friendly. After eating, all carbohydrat Continue reading >>

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