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Do Diabetics Feel Tired After Eating?

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

The Big Secret About Sweet Potatoes That Nobody Wants You To Know

The Big Secret About Sweet Potatoes That Nobody Wants You To Know

You and I have been lied to. I don’t know why, and I don’t even know if it’s on purpose, but it pisses me off. And here’s why I’m annoyed… As of 2014, 29 MILLION people in the US had Diabetes (type 2), and 86 MILLION people were pre-diabetic. That’s over 105 MILLION people who have problems with insulin sensitivity and blood sugar. And my dad and my mother-in-law fall into those categories – my dad’s been type 2 diabetic for over a decade, and my mother-in-law has been pre-diabetic for about the same amount of time. So this particular issue hits very close to home (literally) for me – and presumably for almost anybody in the US, since you almost certainly know a few people who are at least pre-diabetic. The Myth About Sweet Potatoes… Everyone (from doctors, to medical researchers, to even the American Diabetes Association) seems to unanimously state that sweet potatoes are unequivocally great for diabetics (please note that when I mention diabetes in this article, I’m referring to type 2 diabetes). If you don’t believe me, here are just a few examples: And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Even on websites that supposedly pay attention to blood-sugar and glycemic load issues, sweet potatoes are almost always classified as a “better” food than things like white potatoes. Unfortunately…It’s All Completely Untrue! Listen. I’m not bashing sweet potatoes. Entire cultures have lived very healthily on sweet potatoes. I eat sweet potatoes myself. But I also have pretty good insulin sensitivity. It’s like this. Fish is pretty darn nutritious, and almost everybody agrees. But if you’re allergic to fish, you shouldn’t be eating it. It’s pretty simple. So the question is whether sweet potatoes are a problem for people with blood sugar Continue reading >>

Find Out If An Underlying Metabolic Disorder Is Causing Your Fatigue

Find Out If An Underlying Metabolic Disorder Is Causing Your Fatigue

Anyone who is overworked or not getting enough sleep at night can feel tired towards the end of the day. Add the daily stresses of family, kids, commuting, and work and it is not surprising that some days we just feel exhausted and ready for bed long before it is time. In mild cases of an afternoon slump, a good nights' sleep and eating healthier foods can usually resolve the symptoms, but not all afternoon slump symptoms are so easily addressed. For a growing percentage of those who suffer severe afternoon slump, extreme fatigue could be a warning sign of a serious metabolic disorder. Severe symptoms include a profound and intense desire to sleep, muscle fatigue, sweating, the shakes, headaches, changes in vision, or any combination of these symptoms. These symptoms are not signs of "normal" sluggishness but are often signs of pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, or insulin resistance. Sitting Disease As more employees have become sedentary, the number of desk workers who develop "Sitting Disease" is on the rise. Sitting disease is a disorder that puts workers at an increased risk of pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and for cardiovascular problems. Experts reported that even people who sit for extended periods but regularly hit the gym are at risk. Exercise in itself, though obviously critical to our bodies overall, doesn't seem to counter the damaging effects of all this time spent seated. There are many reasons people develop a sluggish feeling in the afternoon (and for some, the "afternoon" slump occurs in mid-morning.) But when symptoms worsen or become severe enough that they decrease your ability to complete tasks, you may want to seek advice from a physician to rule out certain health problems. Pre-Diabetes and Insulin Resistance Pre-diabetes is a condition in which bod Continue reading >>

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Thought the only sign of being diabetic is being overweight? Think again... Around 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes, yet according to Diabetes UK, around 590,000 suffer - but they don't even know about it. And while diabetes - a lifelong condition - can be successfully managed once it’s diagnosed, delaying that diagnosis puts people at risk of serious complications, including amputation and blindness. This is a key concern for Type 2 diabetes, the type associated with weight which accounts for around 90% of all cases. Type 2 occurs when the body can no longer make enough insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas which enables us to use sugar/glucose), or the insulin being produced isn’t doing its job properly. Type 1, on the other hand, has absolutely nothing to do with weight or lifestyle and tends to develop during childhood when a fault in the body causes insulin-producing cells to be destroyed. “The symptoms of Type 1 and Type 2 are very similar, however they tend to come on a lot quicker in Type 1, and you can end up very poorly and in hospital if not diagnosed straight away,” says Diabetes UK clinical advisor Libby Dowling. “Type 2 is a little different. A lot of people put the symptoms of Type 2 down to getting older, and the condition can sometimes go undiagnosed for up to 10 years, by which time complications could have started to develop.” [Read more: Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 - Do you know the difference?] But, aside from increased thirst, needing to be more and tiredness, what are those symptoms? Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Continue reading >>

Signs You May Have Hypoglycemia | Healthcentral

Signs You May Have Hypoglycemia | Healthcentral

Many people - even those without diabetes - exhibit signs of low blood sugar. Read on for 5 subtle signs of hypoglycemia. Feeling suddenly weak or shaky is one of the better known signs of low blood sugar, but that doesnt mean its always easy to notice. Weakness, particularly in the arms or legs, or a feeling of being jittery or trembling could also mean its time to eat. Physical symptoms arent the only signs of low blood sugar; emotional instability can also occur. In fact, if you suspect you have fluctuating blood sugar, your symptoms might include things such as feeling suddenly overwhelmed, frustrated, angry, irritated, or like you could burst into tears. Find yourself breaking into a cold sweat for no reason? Low blood sugar may be to blame. The stress on your body means that it has to work harder, and a cold sweat is a classic sign that your body is having to work too hard to function. Other symptoms might be a rapid or irregular heartbeat, or even blurred vision. Hypoglycemia can bring on feelings of nausea or extreme hunger. Traditionally, eating sugar helps raise blood sugar levels, but try to eat a balanced snack or meal soon afterward, to avoid a repeat sugar crash. When blood sugar is low , it can make you a little spacey. You may find yourself rambling, or others may have a tough time following your conversation. But slurred speech or confusion are more serious signs of dangerously low blood sugar, and should not be taken lightly. Continue reading >>

Lifecoach: Low Blood Sugar Level Symptoms

Lifecoach: Low Blood Sugar Level Symptoms

DOUBTS ABOUT DIABETES Q I have been through the diabetic checklist online and I don’t think I am diabetic. However, from time to time I get light-headed and shaky, and desperately need food. This often happens midmorning even if I have eaten a big bowl of bran flakes for breakfast. Any suggestions? Marion T, by email A SARA STANNER WRITES: Feeling sick or light-headed when you don’t eat can indicate a condition called hypoglycaemia, which is a low blood sugar level. While most cells in the body can use a variety of nutrients for fuel, your brain needs glucose. Related Articles Lifecoach: how can I treat my migraines 11 Apr 2012 Lifecoach: What is the best way to treat psoriasis? 27 Mar 2012 Lifecoach: eye strain caused by an LED computer screen 20 Mar 2012 Lifecoach: Contracting "flu" even after a flu jab 13 Mar 2012 Lifecoach: Is swimming the best exercise for a bad back? 29 Jan 2012 Lifecoach: Do breathing exercises help with long-term asthma? 13 Feb 2012 Hormones in the body keep your blood sugar from rising too high or dropping too low but it can vary slightly after meals, strenuous exercise, or periods of fasting. It can occur in some people if they wait too long to eat. Because your brain cells need glucose, the lack of ingested calories accompanied by a falling glucose level triggers a chain of events that cause the symptoms associated with hypoglycaemia – nausea, lightheadedness, palpitations, weakness, nervousness, sweating, intense hunger, headache or irritability. Some people will never know that their blood sugar level has dropped because, once detected, their bodies make the necessary adjustments. It isn’t clear why others experience symptoms, although some researchers suggest certain people may be more sensitive to the body’s release of some horm Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Diabetic Lethargy

How To Deal With Diabetic Lethargy

Bouts of sleepiness, especially after meals, are some of the most common and disabling symptoms of diabetes. However, there are many causes of lethargy, besides diabetes. So how do you know whether you have diabetic lethargy and, if you do have it, what can you do to combat it? Many diabetics feel, at times, extremely tired, fatigued or lethargic. Having periods when you feel so exhausted that you can only prevent yourself from falling asleep with great difficulty can seriously disrupt your daily life. This tiredness can be caused by blood glucose levels that are too high or too low. But it can also be due to a dozen or so other causes such as stress, overwork, lack of a good night’s sleep and so on. The glucose-insulin system Glucose, a simple sugar, is your body’s primary source of energy. In fact, your muscle cells need glucose all the time so you can talk, walk, run, read a book, think etc. When your food is being digested, glucose is released from your stomach into your bloodstream and carried to your muscle cells. At the same time, insulin, a hormone (type of chemical), is released into your bloodstream from your pancreas. Insulin is needed to enable the glucose to enter your muscle cells. To do this, the insulin attaches itself to receptors in the surface of the cells and causes the cell membranes to allow glucose to enter. The cells then use the glucose as fuel. Of course, if the receptors in your muscle cells are blocked by fat, the insulin will not be able to open them. This is the essential problem faced by type 2 diabetics and is the reason why the only way to beat your diabetes is to eat an extremely low-fat diet designed to unblock the cell receptors. Causes of diabetic lethargy Two common reasons for tiredness or lethargy are having blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Fatigue After Eating Sugar? Here's What All You Need To Know

Fatigue After Eating Sugar? Here's What All You Need To Know

We all love sweets and often consume them to satisfy our taste buds. Some of us even get sugar cravings, which no other foods can satisfy. Sweets or any other high sugar content food item, for that matter, can alleviate our mood or so we think. In some people however, it has an adverse effect. Following are the causes, certain accompanying symptoms and preventive measures to be taken to alleviate the condition. Homeostasis There is a myth associated with sugar that it provides instant energy to the body. The truth is that when a person consumes sugar, the blood sugar levels rise. The pancreas then produce insulin to maintain homeostasis or stable blood sugar levels in the body. This causes a sudden decrease in the blood sugar levels, making a person feel tired. Thus, fatigue after eating sugar is your body's natural response to the increased sugar level. Most of the time, it goes away on its own, once the blood sugar levels become normal again. To stop this tiredness after eating sweets, limit their intake to the maximum you can. Also, refrain from foods containing refined carbohydrates like bread, pasta and rice, among others. Eat a balanced diet and maintain a regularity in the meal timings. Avoid any drastic change in your diet like going on a crash diet or a liquid diet, so that the blood sugar levels are stable. Imbalance of Serotonin Serotonin is a chemical that transmits signals from one area of the brain to another. It influences brain cells related to a number of body functions like sleep, appetite and memory. When a person eats foods high in sugar, the natural response of the body initiates. The blood sugar levels rise and the pancreas releases more insulin into the blood to balance it. In some people, excessive insulin production takes place, causing a protei Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During th Continue reading >>

8 Causes Of Tired After Eating (no.6-8 Deadly)

8 Causes Of Tired After Eating (no.6-8 Deadly)

Have you ever felt so drowsy and tired after eating? Most people had this experience and sometimes this phenomenon makes people become little bit concerns about their health conditions. People tend to afraid that they are suffering from specific diseases and they ended up asking questions like “Why am I tired after eating?”. Sponsors Link For many people, feeling tired after eating, especially after they get their lunch, could be very disturbing since it will affect your productivity throughout the day. The most common thing on why people tend to feel tired after eating is related to food that you consume. The tiredness after eating is a form of reaction from your body to types of food you are consuming. Some experts say the tiredness after eating is a normal condition. But, when you can’t keep your eyes open and just want to sleep so bad no matter what you eat, you should be more concerns about your health since it could be a signal for health problems. In this article, you will find the causes on why you feel so tired after eating. Tired after Eating is a Normal Condition In most cases, the tiredness that you feel after eating a food is a normal situation. Everybody will experience this thing. Here are some explanations on why feeling tired after having a meal is a normal condition. Body Reactions Against Food That You Eat This is the most ideal explanation on why you always feel tired after having a meal. You just feel tired because of your body reacts to the food that you already just ate. After you consume sweet or bakery products, that’s pretty normal if you feel tired afterwards. Food that has a great amount of sugar causes your brain to release high amounts of neurotransmitter and serotonin hormone, which will make people tend to fall asleep. Besides, ea Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

Why Eating Makes You Tired

Why Eating Makes You Tired

Nutritionist Lisa Guy reviews the latest health news and tells why eating can make you tired and why apple cider vinegar aids digestion. Feeling a little tired after eating a heavy meal is perfectly normal. However, if you feel like having a nap after most meals there could be some underlying health problem that needs addressing. When we feel overly tired after eating, it can be related to eating processed foods that contain high levels of sugar and refined carbohydrates. Eating these types of foods causes a rise in blood sugar levels, followed by a drop, which results in low energy levels. Excessive secretion of insulin, which is the body's way of trying to balance blood sugar levels, causes tryptophan to move into the brain, where it is metabolised into serotonin and melatonin. These neurotransmitters have a calming effect and help regulate sleep. To help balance blood sugar and insulin levels, choose natural foods that are high in fibre and protein such as wholegrains, legumes and nuts. Other reasons for feeling tired after eating might be related to food allergies or intolerances, which are usually associated with digestive problems such as bloating, indigestion, wind, constipation or diarrhoea. If you suspect you are allergic or intolerant to a certain food try taking it out of your diet for two weeks, and then reintroduce it again. This a good way to identify any offending foods. General overeating and the consumption of particularly fatty meals can leave you feeling sleepy. Having poor digestion can also leave you feeling tired after meals. Apple cider vinegar aids digestion Apple cider vinegar, made from fermented apple cider, has been popular since the 1970s as a multi-purpose remedy for improving a variety of different ailments. Taken before each meal, apple c Continue reading >>

Feeling Drugged / Extremely Drowsy / Sleepy After Eating?

Feeling Drugged / Extremely Drowsy / Sleepy After Eating?

Hello. I feel extremely drowsy like I'm drugged or something after eating certain foods. This includes oatmeal, white bread and candy, and I think to a lesser extent most food. My blood sugar is normal before eating and after, and I've been tested for diabetes multiple times as well as for celiac and vitamin and mineral deficiencies, all negative. What could cause such a reaction? How long after you have eaten do you get symptoms ? How long do they last ? Do you have any symptoms on waking day after. Whats your day to day diet ? The symptoms last for about 2 hours. It hits immediately after eating one of these foods, but it slowly disappears on taking naps and drinking water. I only have symptoms the next day if I eat one of these foods before going to sleep. My day to day diet isn't really very good, and consistst mainly of cheese sandwitches and dinner, as I have had to eliminate several foods due to gastro symptoms. Hi wk, this could be from a few different causes. Full list of every symptom you suffer would help work out which 1 or more its likely to be. So common causes can be low stomach acid. (Other signs would be weak nails, chronic fatigue, extreme dry skin, multiple food intolerances, undigested food in stool etc and more symptoms) Food intolerances. (I use to fall asleep straight after eating) (other symptoms can range from digestive to mind problems, full list is long) Low digestive enzymes (this can lead to real serious problems, i can pm you more info if you need it. (Symptoms range from undigested food in stool, brain fog, not absorbing vits/mins from foods and lots more symptoms) Poor diet, eating to much in one go. More serious causes can be Afs. (Some can actually fall asleep while eating) day to day extreme fatigue etc) postprandial hypoglycaemia (nor Continue reading >>

Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin For Diabetes

Take metformin just after a meal or with a snack. The most common side-effects are feeling sick, diarrhoea and tummy (abdominal) pain. These symptoms usually pass after the first few days of treatment. Keep your regular appointments with your doctor and clinics. This is so your progress can be checked. About metformin Type of medicine A biguanide antidiabetic medicine Used for Type 2 diabetes mellitus Also called Bolamyn®; Diagemet®; Glucient®; Glucophage®; Metabet®; Sukkarto® Available as Tablets and modified-release tablets; oral liquid medicine; sachets of powder Insulin is a hormone which is made naturally in your body, in the pancreas. It helps to control the levels of sugar (glucose) in your blood. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if it does not use the insulin it makes effectively, this results in the condition called sugar diabetes (diabetes mellitus). People with diabetes need treatment to control the amount of sugar in their blood. This is because good control of blood sugar levels reduces the risk of complications later on. Some people can control the sugar in their blood by making changes to the food they eat but, for other people, medicines like metformin are given alongside the changes in diet. Metformin allows the body to make better use of the lower amount of insulin which occurs in the kind of diabetes known as type 2 diabetes. Metformin can be given on its own, or alongside insulin or another antidiabetic medicine. There are a number of tablets available which contain metformin in combination with one of these other antidiabetic medicines (brands include Jentadueto®, Competact®, Komboglyze®, Janumet®, and Eucreas®). Taking a combination tablet like these can help to reduce the total number of tablets that need to be taken each d Continue reading >>

Why Do We Feel Sleepy After We Eat?

Why Do We Feel Sleepy After We Eat?

"I feel like I am falling down in the afternoon most of the time. I feel so tired after lunch that I cannot keep my eyes open." My friend told me this as we sipped coffee at Starbucks one Sunday. I looked at the empty Splenda packets and the bottle of honey in front of her. Besides that she had a half-eaten bran muffin which she picked at in between the sips of coffee. She is not a known diabetic and she is not on any medications. She is a bit overweight which she claims she got from heredity. Over the years I haven't seen her eat really bad or junk food. Once in awhile she indulges in fast food or partying at night on weekends like any other person. So what's wrong with her? Why does she feel sleepy after eating? "When was the last time you had your blood tests done?" That was the first question that came to my mind. I was afraid she might get angry at me because most people don't like to be asked about their health related issues. "Well, about a year and half ago", she said defiantly. "Maybe you should go for a complete blood test including HbA1c, fasting and postprandial blood sugars", I said. Now that did it. She looked at me as if I was asking her to hang herself to death. After that she avoided meeting with me for a long time. I cursed myself for running my mouth and ruining a good friendship. But how would I become a good friend without wishing well and giving good advice, right? Most people, diabetic or non-diabetic, do feel sleepy after eating meals depending on the kinds of food they eat. For normal people even though the blood sugars come up immediately after intake of food they tend to become normal soon but diabetics do not have that luxury of eating whatever they want and keeping sugars under control. They have to watch what they eat for every meal. Unfort Continue reading >>

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