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Do Diabetic Socks Really Work?

How To Improve Circulation With Socks

How To Improve Circulation With Socks

Poor circulation occurs when insufficient blood flows to your extremities, according to the UAB Health System. The causes of poor circulation to the feet and legs include excess weight, age, nerve damage due to diabetes or other conditions, alcoholism, vitamin deficiencies, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and lack of exercise. Poor circulation is a serious condition that can lead to amputation, stroke and heart attack. You can use socks to improve circulation in your legs and feet by selecting special socks or wearing socks at certain times. Video of the Day Choose well-fitting socks that do not have tight elastic bands at the top. The elastic bands can impede circulation in your legs. Wear socks to warm your cold feet in the winter, around the house and when you go to bed. Poor circulation and nerve damage can make your feet feel cold. Socks improve circulation by warming your feet. Talk to your doctor about wearing compression socks to improve your circulation. Compression socks squeeze your blood vessels and muscles to create contractions that move the blood along your legs and back to your heart. Graduated compression socks provide more compression at the ankle and decreased compression incrementally along the length of the sock. Compression socks are made of rubber, Lycra or spandex. Ask your doctor which compression level is appropriate for your condition. Compression levels range from 8 to 10 mm HG, a measurement that represents millimeter of mercury, up to 40 to 50 mm Hg. Socks with compression levels higher than 20 mm Hg require a prescription. Purchase compression socks, wear them during the day and take them off at night. Avoid wearing compression socks longer than the doctor-prescribed length of time. Your compression socks should fit without bunching. Continue reading >>

So What Are These Socks Really Good For?

So What Are These Socks Really Good For?

You visit the doctor and he tells you to buy compression socks. Your runner friend suggests the same thing. Now what? Whatever the reason you decide to try them out, you’re going to need to do your research first. Wearing the wrong type of socks at the wrong time can result in serious injury or can have no effect at all. Keep reading for a beginner’s guide on compression socks, types, and uses. Types When shopping for compression stockings/socks, you’ll soon learn that there are LOTS of varieties that vary by style, size, material, color, length, and compression level. The type you buy depends on what you’re trying to achieve. If you suffer pain from any of the following, you should visit a doctor for sock advice: Swelling Diabetes Arthritis Varicose veins/spider veins Pregnancy Edema Sclerotherapy If you’re looking for socks to combat general fatigue or to help during exercise, you don’t need to visit a doctor first. In addition to the prevention of certain illnesses, this type of sock is commonly used in the running community. Runners claim they are able to achieve faster times because their legs stay energized during long runs. Hikers enjoy the same feeling as well as the added benefit of a barrier against small injuries like scratches and bug bites. Material: Not all socks are created equal. Material varies by brand. It’s important to pay attention to the material when deciding which socks to buy. The three most common materials are Lycra, spandex, and rubber. The only reason to buy one material over another is for personal comfort. Try a few and wear whatever you like best. Compression stockings (image above) are usually made from a combination of nylon and cotton. Typically used for medical purpose, they are a special type of elastic hosiery that can Continue reading >>

Do Miracle Socks Really Work?

Do Miracle Socks Really Work?

Miracle Socks hope to relieve you of the pain and swelling in your feet and legs. Most of us have experienced sore legs and feet at one point or another, but for some it can be habitual, and unbearable. A pair of compression socks is the usual fix, but those come with some major drawbacks. Can Miracle Socks really be miraculous in providing a solution? Overview Compression socks have been used for many years, and have even been prescribed by doctors as a solution for those who experience swelling in their feet. The problem is that these prescription socks are usually big and bulky, and some people have trouble putting their shoes on after putting these socks on. Traditional compression socks are also not very fashionable, so people didn’t like wearing them in place of normal socks. The Claim The claims come fast and furious with Miracle Socks. They start off by saying that it’s great for those who travel, and more and more people are realizing they need to be careful about the circulation in their legs when going on long flights. They say that it boosts circulation throughout the legs, which reduces fatigue. This means you won’t wear out as quickly during your daily routine, and you’ll be able to recover more easily from a day spent walking around or standing for long periods. They also claim that their compression technology is better than those used in medical compression socks. They even state that it can help with cases of plantar fasciitis and varicose veins. Miracle Socks claim that they provide instant relief when you put them on. They also say they it’s great for those who work all day on their feet, and allows them to keep working without getting tired and needing to sit down. They also say that Miracle Socks fit into any shoe, and that they soothe an Continue reading >>

Does Putting A Raw Cut Onion In Your Sock Cure Medical Ailments?

Does Putting A Raw Cut Onion In Your Sock Cure Medical Ailments?

Placing a raw, cut onion in contact with your foot overnight “purifies your blood”, removes “toxins”, and heals your body. Like so many questionable bits of scientific misinformation, the claim that putting onions on your feet will do something unspecified that has to do with “toxins” is repeated with similar or identical language on many different web sites. One site that has given this concept undue attention is that of David ‘Avocado’ Wolfe, a prolific purveyor of misinterpreted science and blenders. He explains the basic rationale in a November 2016 post: The Chinese found that there are thousands of tiny nerve endings on the bottom of the feet. These nerve endings act as access points to the internal organs. They are also closely linked to the nervous system. Onions have strong anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties. When you cut an onion and place it on the bottom of the foot, it gets right to work removing toxins and healing your body. If that explanation isn’t doing it for you, Wolfe provides additional reasoning as well. But, like a desperate student called on in class after a heavy night of not studying, Wolfe lists numerous unrelated, disconnected, illogical, and wholly inaccurate claims about how an onions on your feet might impart a health benefit in the hopes that the sheer volume of answers will not betray his own lack of knowledge. Only three of these five explanations hold even a modicum of relevance to the onion sock theory: Onions detox the body – Onions are rich in sulphuric compounds. These compounds are responsible for their strong odor. Sulfer [sic] helps the body release unwanted toxins, especially in the liver. Onions purify your blood – While the onion is next to your foot, phosphoric acid is released. It enters your blo Continue reading >>

Compression Socks And Sleeves – Do They Really Work?

Compression Socks And Sleeves – Do They Really Work?

Not that long ago, pretty much the only time you heard about compression socks was the treatment of varicose veins or complications of diabetes. And for sure, compression hose can make a big difference in both conditions, improving circulation and relieving many of the painful symptoms associated with diabetes and varicose veins. But in recent years, compression socks and sleeves have gained considerably more attention as a way to improve healing and enhance athletic performance – naturally. Tune in any football or soccer game, and you’re likely to see at least a few players wearing compression garments. Even Olympic athletes like Alpine skier Lindsey Vonn have begun singing their praises, using compression garments from Incrediwear to speed recovery after injury or surgery or to help enhance their training activities. How do compression socks and sleeves work? It all starts with a basic understanding of circulation: The heart pumps oxygen-rich blood from the lungs throughout the rest of the body via the arteries, delivering nutrients to all the organs and tissues, including the muscles. Once the nutrients and oxygen have been “delivered,” the blood blood returns to the lungs and heart through the veins. Veins contain tiny valves that keep the blood moving in the right direction. Compression socks work by providing additional support to the blood vessels, particularly the veins that have to work against gravity to return the blood to the heart. Compression garments provide graduated compression, providing increased pressure at one end of the garment and less pressure in other regions to promote blood flow. And it’s not just the veins that benefit. Some studies have shown arterial blood flow increases as much as 30% during the recovery phase of exercise when mu Continue reading >>

How Do Compression Socks Work For Diabetics?

How Do Compression Socks Work For Diabetics?

Compression therapy is particularly beneficial for patients with diabetes. Compression socks are worn to improve circulation in patients with various medical issues, such as diabetes and varicose veins or those at risk of developing blood clots. As a non-invasive treatment method, compression therapy serves as a tool for maintaining the right amount of pressure in your feet and legs. So, how do compression socks work and why are they particularly helpful for people with diabetes? What Causes Poor Circulation? When patients experience circulation problems in the lower extremities, it is often due to a condition known as venous insufficiency. As you know, the circulatory system consists of arteries that deliver oxygenated blood throughout the body, and veins that return deoxygenated blood and waste products back to the heart and lungs for recirculation. The muscles in your feet and calves act as a pump to help blood flow back up through the legs against the pull of gravity. In some people, vein walls in the legs lose their elasticity and become weak, causing the valves inside the veins to pull apart. These valves normally open and close to allow blood to flow up in one direction. When valves become pulled apart due to weakened vein walls, they do not close properly, allowing blood to flow in two directions. This causes blood to pool in the lower extremities and results in peripheral edema (swelling) in the legs, ankles, and feet. How Do Compression Socks Work to Improve Circulation? Compression socks improve circulation by gently squeezing the foot and calf muscles, which in turn straightens out the vein walls to a better working state. This gentle compression allows the valves to function properly by opening to allow blood flow toward the heart and closing to prevent blo Continue reading >>

Do Compression Socks Really Work? The Science Behind The Claims

Do Compression Socks Really Work? The Science Behind The Claims

Over the last several years there has been increasing interest in, and use of, graded compression socks by athletes for training, racing, and recovery. Advertisements for these garments claim much. Member AMSSM Over the last several years there has been increasing interest in, and use of, graded compression socks by athletes for training, racing, and recovery. Advertisements for these garments claim that wearing them provides more energy, greater endurance, and enhanced performance. Advertisements also report that graded compression socks improve recovery when worn after athletic events. While exciting in theory, in reality there is little evidence behind these claims. The theory behind graded compression technology: In modern medicine, compression stockings are used to prevent and minimize edema (swelling of the extremities) from incompetent veins (blood vessels that return deoxygenated blood to the heart), which occur in some medical conditions (e.g. diabetes, advanced age, heart failure, kidney failure). They are also used to prevent blood from stagnating in the veins and forming blood clots when the muscles are not actively contracting to push blood through the veins and back to the heart (e.g. prolonged bed rest and after surgery). As applied to athletic performance, theories postulate that wearing graded compression technology will help speed blood to the muscles and improve venous return to the heart, thereby improving performance. Other purported benefits of the product include: reducing pain from shin splints by reducing vibration and promoting healing, removing lactic acid from the muscles (lactic acid is a byproduct of intense exercise which can cause muscle aching), increasing blood flow to the Achilles tendon, warming and soothing pulled muscles, and preven Continue reading >>

Do Compression Socks Really Work?

Do Compression Socks Really Work?

Compression socks: they’re trendy, they come in fun, neon colors and bright patterns, and some athletes wouldn’t dream of running without them. But what do compression socks – and other compression apparel, like calf sleeves, thigh sleeves, and tights – really do besides make a fashion statement? The science behind compression socks Athletic compression socks are a version of compression stockings that have long been used in the medical field. Compression socks and stockings are tight – they put extra pressure on the feet, ankles, and calves. Compression stockings were first prescribed to treat and prevent blood vessel problems in the legs. By putting pressure on the lower limbs, compression socks increase blood flow in the legs and send the blood back up towards the heart where it belongs. This stops blood from pooling in the lower legs, combats varicose veins, and reduces leg swelling. Traditionally, compression stockings have been used to help prevent and treat complications associated with diabetes, pregnancy, deep vein thrombosis, among other conditions. Compression socks and running So, just how does this help runners and other endurance athletes? Compression garment manufacturers claim the apparel does a lot – everything from preventing cramps, decreasing lactic acid, and speeding up recovery. Some runners say wearing compression socks during races helps them run longer before fatiguing, which results in speedier race times. However, there’s no science to back many of these claims up – especially when it comes to wearing compression socks during a run. Most research shows no significant statistical difference in performance or recovery in subjects who wore compression socks while running vs. those who didn’t. A few small, lab-based studies found Continue reading >>

Compression Guide

Compression Guide

Previously found on the legs of diabetics and airplane pilots, compression socks, tights, pants, shorts, and other various sleeves have been making their way onto plenty of runners and athletes from other sports to help them possibly improve their performance. Perhaps that's because they've been shown in studies to stimulate blood flow, helping legs recover faster from a hard run. Companies that sell compression garments—any variety of compression pant, sock, tight, or calf sleeve for men and women—claim they have the ability to assist in blood circulation, reduce blood lactate concentration during running, and control the amount of muscle oscillation that results from pounding during running—or any sport. Research has been mixed on how well items like a compression sleeve or sock helps you when you’re running, but when it comes to post-exercise help, plenty of research supports the link between decreased post-exercise soreness and the use of compression. (Note: No research has shown that compression gear decreases your running performance.) There’s also a psychological benefit to wearing items like a compression calf sleeve, tight, and other gear because you “feel” like you’re doing something to actively help your recovery and boost your performance for the next run. That’s why compression clothing is mostly used by men and women in attempt to recover from a hard run or workout, along with after races, as quickly as possible. For example, if your legs are feeling beat up after a hard marathon or half marathon, the snug, knee-high socks and leggings are meant to increase circulation and reduce the lactic acid build-up you’re feeling. Some runners wear compression gear—like compression sleeves on the calf or arms—while training and racing. High co Continue reading >>

Why You Should Wear Compression Socks On Your Next Flight

Why You Should Wear Compression Socks On Your Next Flight

We've all been there. Long flight, cramped in coach. You finally land and discover your ankles have swollen to twice the normal size and maybe it even hurts to walk to baggage claim. Traveling is so rewarding but can take a toll on your circulation. While the risk of developing blood clots on a flight is low, it goes up as travel time increases. Enter compression socks. Yes, really. Your grandmother and marathon runners are on to something. These stockings help increase circulation and reduce the risk of swelling or worse deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and clotting on a long flight. According to the Mayo Clinic, "Compression stockings steadily squeeze your legs, helping your veins and leg muscles move blood more efficiently. They offer a safe, simple and inexpensive way to keep blood from stagnating." But as cute as they can be, if, like me, you don't like wearing them all the time, just toss a pair in your carry-on and change on the plane. I never fly without them now and gift them to other travelers all the time. They're also great for hiking, skiing and other outdoor activities where you're on your feet all day. If you're new to putting on compression socks, it takes a litle practice. The best way to put them on is to grab the toe and fold the rest of the stock inside out. Place your foot into the toe area and roll the rest of the stocking over your ankle and leg. And remember: If they feel too tight or painful, you got the wrong size. And that can actually cause more harm than good. Compression socks should feel like your calves are getting a gentle hug, not being strangled. If you've tried compression socks and just hate the feeling, the Mayo Clinic also recomends these actions to help circulation while traveling: Continue reading >>

Siren Diabetic Socks Vs. Diabetic Socks

Siren Diabetic Socks Vs. Diabetic Socks

Socks are an important preventive tool for people who have diabetes because they work to protect the feet from a potential injury. This is important because for individuals with diabetes even the most minor foot wound can turn into a serious complication. For those with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, the dangers of foot injuries are even higher because they are unable to feel the pain or irritation of an injury. So, small scrapes or cuts may quickly develop into larger problems. We recommend wearing socks daily, especially while at home, to help protect your feet. But, some socks do a better job of protecting your feet than others. Not All Socks Are Created Equal Whenever you go to the store, you’ll probably see socks. You can find them everywhere from the local corner store to a high-end boutique, but not all socks are created equal especially for people with diabetes. Because individuals living with diabetes are at risk for foot injuries and infection due to circulatory and nervous system damage, diabetic and smart socks are designed to help keep your feet protected in the best possible way. What socks are good for people with diabetes? You’ll want to select socks with the following features: Padded or cushioned Non-Binding Seamless Moisture Wicking Non-Elastic The goal of socks is to keep your feet dry and protected from the elements and foreign objects that could cause an injury. Additionally, you can choose a light or white colored sock to see if there are any visual indicators of an injury like drainage or bleeding. What types of socks are there for people with diabetes? Regular Diabetic Socks Diabetic socks are designed to reduce pressure, prevent injury, and reduce the accumulation of moisture around the feet. These types of socks are usually made from a co Continue reading >>

Can Copper Help Prevent Lower Extremity Complications In Patients With Diabetes?

Can Copper Help Prevent Lower Extremity Complications In Patients With Diabetes?

Issue Number: Volume 24 - Issue 12 - December 2011 Author(s): Gary M. Rothenberg, DPM, CDE, CWS The wound care arena of the 21st century offers the practicing clinician a wide array of products and technologies to utilize in the management of diabetic foot ulcerations. Our patients are benefitting from the explosion of emerging technologies and evidence-based algorithms are helpful in guiding treatment interventions. Some technologies are innovative and a reflection of modern discoveries while others like medicinal applications for copper were in use in ancient times. Copper has been used for centuries as a disinfectant of fluids, solids and tissues. It is known to have both natural antibacterial and antifungal properties. Constant exposure to high copper concentrations is toxic to microorganisms yet resistance is extremely rare. There are several theories given for the potent biocidal activity of copper. These theories include: alteration of proteins and inhibition of their biological assembly and activity; plasma membrane permeabilization; and membrane lipid peroxidation.1 As a vital trace element, copper is known to be safe and tolerated by humans. The United States National Academy of Sciences Committee recommends a daily allowance of 0.9 mg of copper for normal adults. Common naturally occurring dietary resources of copper include vegetables, legumes, nuts, grains and fruits, as well as shellfish, avocado and beef. Given that copper is present in the earth’s crust, most of the world’s surface water and ground water used for drinking purposes contains small amounts of copper. Copper is required for the normal function of many human tissues including skin and is postulated as an important cofactor in angiogenesis and wound repair. Copper is necessary (along with Continue reading >>

Copper Fit Socks Reviews

Copper Fit Socks Reviews

About Copper Fit Socks Copper Fit Socks are a new type of athletic footwear that claim to combine a cotton blend fabric with a powerful copper-infused footbed that wicks moisture and prevents foot odor. On top of this, regardless of which activities you enjoy, Copper Fit Socks are claimed to feature high-quality construction and a comfortable fit for extended wear. As any athlete (who’s required to wear shoes) will tell you, choosing the right sock can make all the difference. Socks that are too thick won’t allow your feet to breathe properly, while socks that are too thin might result in blisters. With this in mind, while Copper Fit Socks’ ability to wick moisture could be a benefit, where do they land as far as overall performance? In other words, what types of activities are they best suited for, and are they ultimately worth the price? While Copper Fit Socks are a brand new product, we’ve reviewed numerous copper-based products here at HighYa, so allow us to help you become a more informed consumer before you hand over your hard-earned money. How Do Copper Fit Socks Work? Unlike Miracle Copper Socks, which are intended to be used as compression garments, Copper Fit Socks are constructed of a standard cotton blend that wicks moisture away from your feet. This, in combination with Copper Fit Socks’ copper-infused footbed, is claimed to help prevent the buildup of sweat and to help eliminate foot odor. Despite these anti-moisture and anti-odor capabilities though, Copper Fit Socks are claimed to be durable, comfortable, and performance-oriented, regardless of the activity you’ll be using them for. On top of this, the manufacturer claims that Copper Fit Socks are equally effective for men and women. How Much Do Copper Fit Socks Cost? Can They be Returned? Co Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetic Socks

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetic Socks

Diabetes is a disease that requires many medical equipment for daily treatment and monitoring. The most common supplies includes blood glucose monitor, glucose test strips, lancets, and syringes. Although not a lot of people consider diabetic socks a necessity, they are crucial to better health and prevention of various complications. If you are wondering if you should invest in diabetic socks, this article will help you decide by explaining these topics below: What are Diabetic Socks? Diabetic socks are specially designed socks to 1) reduce pressure in the lower leg and foot, 2) prevent blistering on the skin surfaces, and 3) minimize moisture accumulation. Ultimately, their jobs are to protect your feet and provide maximum comfort. These socks are typically non-elastic and seamless. The non-elastic feature is to prevent constriction due to common feet swelling tendencies. The seamless design is to minimize friction to the nerves and minimize neurological discomfort and pain. These socks simply fit well to prevent restrictions in the calf from a tight sock line that can limit circulation. When circulation is decreased, it becomes harder for the body to heal. High blood sugar which is associated with diabetes also causes the immune system to slow down. Specialized socks are one way to combat this duo of issues to prevent the need for future amputation or even death due to foot injury. Aside from the two special structures, these socks are always slightly cushioned to prevent injury. At the same time, there are reinforced moisture-wicking ability so that sweat and humidity from your shoes are not trapped between the sock and foot. By keeping your feet dry, your feet are at less risk of developing blisters and fungal infections. Who Should Use Diabetic Socks? Not all peop Continue reading >>

Diabetic Sock

Diabetic Sock

A diabetic sock is a non-binding and non-elasticized sock which is designed alleviate pressure of the foot or leg.[1] Typically sufferers of diabetes are the most common users of this type of sock.[2] Diabetes raises the blood sugar level, which can increase the risk of foot ulcers. Diabetic socks are made to be unrestrictive of circulation.[citation needed] Some diabetic socks also control moisture,[2][3] a feature which can reduce the risk of infection. Another beneficial feature of diabetic socks is seamless toe-closures to reduce pressure and blistering.[2] Varieties[edit] Various sock constructions are available, including cotton blend with stretch tops, non-cotton with antimicrobial properties, compression type, and plain non-binding to allow circulation to flow more freely. Extra wide socks are available for excessive edema. Diabetic socks may appear like regular socks, and are available in both low-cut and mid-calf styles. Although various colors are available, white may be preferable for people with open wounds or sores, as this could alert wearers with compromised sensation to a draining wound. The diabetic socks should fit well, without constricting cuffs, lumps, or uncomfortable seams. The socks are generally made of material that does not wrinkle.[4] The advice of a podiatrist may be helpful in choosing a diabetic sock.[5] See also[edit] Compression stockings, which provide the opposite features Diabetic foot Diabetic shoe [edit] Continue reading >>

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