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Do Diabetes Cause Weight Loss

Unexplained Weight Loss With Diabetes

Unexplained Weight Loss With Diabetes

You might be aware that as a metabolic disorder, some forms of diabetes come with excessive weight. But diabetes might also cause a sudden drop in weight too. In fact, many patients who are ultimately diagnosed with diabetes first go to their doctor with concerns about unexplained weight loss. Several mechanisms are behind this symptom. Weight loss can occur as a consequence of high blood sugar, dehydration, muscle breakdown and problems with your thyroid. Video of the Day Although both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can involve fairly dramatic weight loss over several days at the onset of the disease, it tends to be more common among people with type 1. In both cases, the cause is that your body fails to adequately deal with insulin. The job of insulin is to transport glucose from the foods you eat into your cells to provide energy for all the work that’s required to keep you alive. However, most type 1 diabetics don’t produce insulin. Type 2 diabetics either don’t produce enough insulin or their bodies don’t respond to it properly. Consequently, even if you eat normally, that blood sugar simply builds up and gets excreted in your urine. This causes weight loss, but it could also damage your organs if you don't receive treatment. If you experience an unexplained weight loss, surpassing 5 percent of your body weight within days, see your health care provider as soon as possible. Another symptom of diabetes associated with weight loss is frequent urination. When you urinate more frequently and don’t drink enough to replace the lost fluid, you become dehydrated. Urination increases in diabetes, because your kidneys have to work harder to filter the excess glucose building up in your system. The increased glucose in the urine draws fluid from your tissues. When you l Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss In Some People And Weight Gain In Some Others?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss In Some People And Weight Gain In Some Others?

To understand dynamics of body weight first we have to understand Energy balance equation which states Calorie intake - calorie lost = Weight So if, Calorie intake > calorie lost = Weight Gain Calorie intake < calorie lost = Weight Loss Calorie intake = calorie lost = Weight is maintained Let's try to understand it in patients with diabetes Scenarios causing weight gain in Diabetes 1. In patients with type 2 Diabetes some may have predominantly insulin resistance ( cells are not as much sensitive to action of insulin as they should be ) This makes their pancreas to secrete excess insulin in an attempt to overcome this resistance . Excessive insulin coupled with high calorie intake causes weight gain 2. A patient of Type 1 Diabetes or type 2 Diabetes who has good control of glucose but consumes excess calories than he needs is bound to gain weight . A good number of patients resort to defensive eating for the fear of hypoglycemia and this also causes weight gain Scenarios causing weight loss in Diabetes 1. Any patient with uncontrolled diabetes will usually have weight loss . This is due to the fact that cells of our body are deprived of glucose as a source of energy and therefore body resorts to using fat and protein as alternative sources causing weight loss 2. A patient of Type 1 Diabetes or type 2 Diabetes who has good control of glucose but consumes less calories than he needs loses weight . In addition associated thyroid disorders may also have some influence on weight . Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss

Unexplained Weight Loss

Tweet Unexplained weight loss is the term used to describe a decrease in body weight that occurs unintentionally and can be a warning sign of diabetes. The amount you weigh is determined by a number of factors including age, your calorie intake and overall health. Once you reach middle adulthood, your weight should remain relatively stable from year to year. Losing or gaining a few pounds here and there is normal, but unexplained weight loss that is significant (10 lbs/4.5kg or more or over 5% of your body weight) or persistent may signal an underlying medical condition. Unexplained weight loss means weight loss that occurs without trying through dieting or exercising. What are the possible causes of unexplained weight loss? Unintentional or unexplained weight loss can be caused by a number of things, including depression, certain medication and diabetes. Potential causes of unexplained weight loss include: Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need lon Continue reading >>

I Am Trying To Lose Weight. I Have Reduced My Food Intake By 60%. How Much Water Should I Drink Every Day In View Of Reduced Food Intake?

I Am Trying To Lose Weight. I Have Reduced My Food Intake By 60%. How Much Water Should I Drink Every Day In View Of Reduced Food Intake?

All the answers suggested that - One should not reduce the food intake. But should be in calorie deficit mode. Both the above statements are contradictory to each other. I suggested that I am reducing the food intake by 60%. Every body said that food intake should not be reduced but there should be calorie deficit of about 15 to 25%. Crash dieting is bad for health. The answers suggested that I should refer to BMR table, consult nutrition experts or doctors. Most of the people suggested to drink 3 to 6 liters of water on average. No reasons were given for that suggestion. Question was specifically asking about water intake and not food intake. Now allow me to give feedback - I reduced the food intake for about 2 months. On some of the days I did take nuts and some dry fruits. Say about 15 days. Yes there seems to be some damage. I used to get tired. My resting metabolism crashed. My feet and legs started paining by even minimal walking. My feet started paining - which was not the case earlier even if I were to walk for 30 kms non stop. Now it was just less than 1 kms and sole of the feet will pain. I put on weight after I started eating normal. During the period I was eating less there was no weight loss. Today I weight about 2 kg more than my weight when I started. I am still not able to eat my normal food. I feel uneasy even after eating my very normal food. I cannot dream of eating more than normal food. Where earlier I could eat almost 100% more than normal food it I loved the food. It seems that my blood sugar has gone up. Though I have not taken reading. I am sure if I had continued doing this for another 3–4 months I would have been BP patient and diabetic. I feel some extra pressure on my heart as well. Now I am trying my best to reach my normal food intake an Continue reading >>

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

People with diabetes receive mixed messages about weight loss from magazines, newspapers, friends, family, and, yes, even health professionals. Few subjects have accumulated as much misleading and potentially dangerous folklore as the subject of obesity. A common message is that losing weight is just a matter of willpower, and if you have been losing weight and reach a plateau, it's because you've lost your willpower and are no longer following your diet. Furthermore, for people with type 2 diabetes, the message often is that weight loss is the answer to improving glucose control: “If you just lose 20 lb, you won't need insulin.” What does research tell us about these issues, and what should our messages as health professionals be to people with diabetes? Obesity is a serious worldwide problem and is associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Today, more than 1.1 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese.1 In the past 20 years, the rates of obesity have tripled in developing countries that have adopted a Western lifestyle, with the Middle East, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, India, and China facing the greatest increase. Consequently, the number of people with diabetes in these countries is expected to increase from 84 million in 2000 to 228 million by 2030. Thus, preventing obesity is a high priority for the prevention of diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to some obesity researchers, it may not be possible to decrease the current numbers of overweight and obese people in the United States, but we need to try to slow or prevent the increase that has been occurring at an alarming rate.2 The hope is that slowing the rising prevalence of obesity will also slow the diabetes epidemic. Can this be accomplished? Thus fa Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

I recently was included in a discussion on a Facebook group for athletes with diabetes about how hard it can be to lose weight through exercise. While I would never claim to have all the answers on this topic, here are some ideas about what can make you gain weight or keep you from losing weight with diabetes, based on my decades of professional and personal experience with diabetes and weight management, and what you can do about it. Insulin My former graduate student with type 1 diabetes went on an insulin pump and promptly gained about 10 pounds, even though his blood glucose control improved only marginally. Why did this happen to him (and why does it happen to so many other insulin users)? As a naturally occurring anabolic hormone, insulin promotes the uptake and storage of glucose, amino acids, and fat into insulin-sensitive cells around your body (mainly muscle and fat cells). It doesn’t matter whether it’s released naturally, injected, or pumped—all insulin and insulin analogues have these same effects. Going on intensive insulin therapy is associated with fat weight gain (1), for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Some of the weight gain comes from that if you’re using insulin to keep your blood glucose in control, you’ll be keeping and storing all of the calories that you’re eating instead of losing some glucose through urine (during hyperglycemia). Unfortunately, this realization has led some people to try skipping or limiting their insulin use to help them lose weight (2), but that is a dangerous practice that can lead to loss of excess muscle mass and life-threatening conditions like DKA. The best way to balance your insulin use and your body weight, in my opinion, is to be physically active to keep your overall insulin levels lower. I Continue reading >>

Digestive Weight Loss Center

Digestive Weight Loss Center

Diabetes is a very serious disease that causes high blood sugar levels (elevated blood glucose). The American Diabetes Association estimates that about eight percent of Americans suffer from diabetes. Diabetes: What You Need to Know People with diabetes have an increased risk of strokes, heart attacks, high-blood pressure, kidney disease and blindness. If you are obese, you can reduce your risk of developing diabetes by eating a low-fat, low-sugar diet and exercising regularly. If you can lose 5-10 percent of your body weight, you will lower your risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. Johns Hopkins can help you lose this weight with our weight loss services, including behavior modification, nutritional counseling and a new, special endoscopic procedure. Learn more about our weight loss services. Types of Diabetes There are three types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and gestational (diabetes that occurs during pregnancy). Type 1 typically occurs during childhood. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type and is linked to obesity. See a table that explains blood sugar values and types of diabetes. How diabetes is harmful Most people don’t really understand the way diabetes works, but a firm grasp of how it affects your body chemistry will help you better control the disease. Your body is made up of millions of cells, and these cells use glucose as their energy source. Your body gets glucose from the food that you eat. After a meal, your body secrets a hormone called insulin into your blood; insulin works as a signal to let your cells know that glucose is on the way to feed your cells. But, for people with diabetes, the signals that tell the cells to absorb the sugar are defective, or the body does not make enough insulin. As a result, high levels of glucose remain in the Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Rapid Weight Loss?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Rapid Weight Loss?

So, I’m going to assume that you’re talking about type 1 diabetes. There are two types of diabetes that are distinctly different metabolic disorders. The answer to your question is the effects of insulin in the body. When type 1’s lose their production of insulin, their bodies no longer are able to store fat or even utilize what blood sugar is being produced by the body. This causes the body to basically consume first fat and then even lean muscle mass. If you look at left hand picture of this type 1 before the discovery of insulin you’ll see the emaciated look of someone starving. The picture on the right shows a more normal body weight after insulin injections were started. So, for type 1’s the lack of insulin can cause rapid weight loss. The lack of insulin causes the body to start basically eating itself. Type 2’s can lose weight if their bodies stop producing insulin; however, for most type 2’s things work in reverse. They have a problem of insulin resistance caused by too much insulin in their system. Too much insulin normally causes the type 2’s to store fat and gain weight. That’s the connection between type 2 diabetes and obesity. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Millions of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes could be cured of the disease if they just lost weight, a new study suggests. Scientists at Newcastle University have shown the disease is caused by fat accumulating in the pancreas and losing less than one gram from the organ can reverse the life-limiting illness and restore insulin production. Type 2 diabetes affects 3.3 million people in England and Wales and, until now, was thought to be chronic. It can lead to blindness, stroke, kidney failure and limb amputation. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal” Professor Roy Taylor, Newcastle University But now researchers at Newcastle have shown that the disease can be reversed, even in obese people who have had the condition for a long time. 18 obese people with Type 2 diabetes who were given gastric band surgery and put on a restricted diet for eight weeks were cured of their condition. During the trial the patients, aged between 25 and 65, lost an average of 2.2 stone, which was around 13 per cent of their body weight. Crucially they also lost 0.6 grams of fat from their pancreas, allowing the organ to secrete normal levels of insulin. The team is now planning a larger two year study involving 200 people with Glasgow University to check that the findings can be replicated and weight loss can be sustained for two years. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal,” said Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University who also works within the Newcastle Hospitals. “So if you ask how much weight you need to lose to make your diabetes go away, the answer is one gram. But t Continue reading >>

How Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. An analysis published in The BMJ aims to let doctors and the public in on a little-known secret: Type 2 diabetes, in many cases, is curable. People can reverse their diabetes by losing about 33 pounds, say the authors of the new paper, despite popular belief that the diagnosis is always a permanent one. If more people were striving for this goal, and if more doctors were documenting instances of diabetes remission, complication rates and health-care costs could both be reduced dramatically, the authors say. The analysis is based on evidence from recent clinical trials. In one from 2011, people who were recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes returned their blood sugar levels to normal when they lost weight on a calorie-restrictive diet. In a 2016 follow-up study, people who had been diabetic for up to 10 years were able to reverse their condition when they lost about 33 pounds. TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now Mike Lean, professor of human nutrition at the University of Glasgow in Scotland, is an author of both the new analysis and of those earlier trials. He says a person’s likelihood of remission from diabetes is greatest in the first five years after being diagnosed. Type 2 diabetes, he wrote in an email, is a disease “best avoided by avoiding the weight gain that drives it.” For people who do develop it, he believes that evidence-based weight-loss programs could help them achieve lasting remission. “Not all can do it, but they should all be given the chance with good support,” Lean writes. “Taking tablets or injections for life to reduce blood sugar is a poor second rate treatment.” Current guidelines for the managemen Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

Not everybody with diabetes needs to lose weight. Some people have the opposite problem; the pounds just won’t stay on. Although certainly a great source of calories, filling up on hot fudge sundaes isn’t the best way to fill out your frame if you have diabetes. Before we talk about some healthful strategies for weight gain, it is important to make sure your efforts to add a few pounds are not sabotaged by out of control blood glucose numbers. If your glucose level is very high, all the extra calories in the world won’t have the desired effect. When the body perceives it is starving –that is essentially what occurs when it can’t use all the glucose building up in the blood stream– glucose (energy or calories) spills into the urine. So instead of keeping those precious calories to add muscle and some fat you will end up losing weight. If you are losing weight and your glucose levels are in good control then a visit to your health care provider is in order to look for other causes of weight loss. The old adage says; to gain a pound a week, add 500 calories a day to your current calorie level. Now new research tells us that this isn’t entirely accurate, but it is still a good place to start. You can find out about how many calories you are eating now by using any one of a hundreds of nutrition management websites on the internet: Caloriecount.com, Myfitnesspal.com and Fitday.com are three options. One of the first things to look at when you are trying to gain weight is low calorie foods to eliminate. Plain beverages such as black coffee or tea, broth soups, low calorie salads all fill you up without providing much in the way of calories. All of your food chooses should be as calorie dense as possible. If you like salads for example, keep the lettuce to a mini Continue reading >>

Weight Loss As A Symptom

Weight Loss As A Symptom

As a rule, if you have lost weight and do not know why then see a doctor. A doctor's assessment and tests will usually be able to find the cause. Weight loss is often a matter of choice - we choose to change our diet and exercise habits to become more healthy. If there is a clear and healthy reason then weight loss is normal. However, it is also common to lose weight if you have a serious disease. For most serious diseases, there will usually be one or more other symptoms that develop well before any weight loss. The weight loss in these situations is explained and can often be expected. However, occasionally, the first symptom to develop in some serious diseases is weight loss. Other symptoms usually develop at some point later. Also, some people with weight loss as a first symptom actually have one or more symptoms if they were questioned about them. But, they may not have been aware of the significance of the other symptoms. For example, weight loss is a common symptom of untreated type 2 diabetes. Some people may see a doctor to say that they have lost weight and don't know why. A doctor may then ask if they have been passing more urine than usual (a typical symptom of diabetes). To this question the person may say something like "now you mention it, yes I have. But I had just put that down to my ageing prostate gland and not thought much about it." The rest of this article lists some of the more common conditions where weight loss is sometimes the first symptom noticed by the person, relative or friend. It does not relate to people who are dieting or exercising to lose weight deliberately. The list is not exhaustive. On the Forums 56 years (male, former smoker)- I am 5 feet 5 inches. Generally my body weight varies between 59 to 62 kgs when I am healthy. I have bee Continue reading >>

10 Reasons Why Unexplained Weight Loss Is A Serious Problem!

10 Reasons Why Unexplained Weight Loss Is A Serious Problem!

Read in Hindi You are not dieting; you don’t work out to lose weight; and you are losing weight quickly. Initially, you are not concerned, maybe even you are pleased a little. However, unexplained weight loss and fatigue are two of the commonest symptoms you will experience with a progressive illness. There are many possible causes of sudden weight loss and some of which might be caused due to a serious illness. Here are 10 common conditions that cause unexplained weight loss. #1 Diabetes Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which you may have high blood glucose levels (blood sugar) either because sufficient insulin is not produced in your body or because your body does not respond properly to insulin, or even both. Here are some expert tips to keep diabetes in control. Symptoms: Frequent urination, excessive thirst, intense hunger, weight gain (type-2 diabetes), significant and sudden weight loss (especially in type-1 diabetes), fatigue, cuts and bruises not healing properly, numbness or tingling in feet and hands. #2 Depression Depression is a mood disorder in which feelings of sadness, loss, anger, or frustration interfere with everyday life for weeks or longer. Here are 5 interesting facts about depression. Symptoms: Not sleeping or sleeping too much, difficulty concentrating, negative thoughts, feelings of hopelessness and /or helplessness, irritable, suicidal, significant and sudden weight loss. #3 Overactive thyroid The thyroid gland produces the hormones thyroid which regulates your body’s metabolism, for example, your heart rate, how quickly you burn calories, and digestion. Thyroid gland also produces a hormone calcitonin that regulates the level of calcium in your blood. When the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone (overactive), the condition i Continue reading >>

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