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Do Diabetes Cause Weight Loss

Your Weight And Diabetes

Your Weight And Diabetes

Diabetes is a group of disorders characterized by chronic high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to the body's failure to produce any or enough insulin to regulate high glucose levels. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which often occurs in children or adolescents, is caused by the body's inability to make insulin or type 2 diabetes, which occurs as a result of the body's inability to react properly to insulin (insulin resistance). Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent than type 1 diabetes and is therefore seen in roughly 90% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes is predominantly diagnosed after the age of forty, however, it is now being found in all age ranges, including children and adolescents. The impact of diabetes goes beyond chronic hyperglycemia. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness (diabetic retinopathy), end stage kidney diseases (diabetic nephropathy) and non-traumatic lower extremity amputations (diabetic neuropathy) in working-age adults. People with diabetes are also two to four times more likely to experience cardiovascular complications and strokes. Diabetes and its related complications result in an estimated 200,000+ deaths each year, making diabetes one of the major causes of mortality in the U.S. In 2012, the NIH reported an estimated 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) living with diabetes. Of these, an estimated 8.1 million persons were unaware that they had the disease. How does my weight relate to type 2 diabetes? There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes such as age, race, pregnancy, stress, certain medications, genetics or family history, high cholesterol and obesity. However, the single best predictor of type 2 diabetes is overweight or obesity. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes a Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss In Some People And Weight Gain In Some Others?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss In Some People And Weight Gain In Some Others?

To understand dynamics of body weight first we have to understand Energy balance equation which states Calorie intake - calorie lost = Weight So if, Calorie intake > calorie lost = Weight Gain Calorie intake < calorie lost = Weight Loss Calorie intake = calorie lost = Weight is maintained Let's try to understand it in patients with diabetes Scenarios causing weight gain in Diabetes 1. In patients with type 2 Diabetes some may have predominantly insulin resistance ( cells are not as much sensitive to action of insulin as they should be ) This makes their pancreas to secrete excess insulin in an attempt to overcome this resistance . Excessive insulin coupled with high calorie intake causes weight gain 2. A patient of Type 1 Diabetes or type 2 Diabetes who has good control of glucose but consumes excess calories than he needs is bound to gain weight . A good number of patients resort to defensive eating for the fear of hypoglycemia and this also causes weight gain Scenarios causing weight loss in Diabetes 1. Any patient with uncontrolled diabetes will usually have weight loss . This is due to the fact that cells of our body are deprived of glucose as a source of energy and therefore body resorts to using fat and protein as alternative sources causing weight loss 2. A patient of Type 1 Diabetes or type 2 Diabetes who has good control of glucose but consumes less calories than he needs loses weight . In addition associated thyroid disorders may also have some influence on weight . Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Losing weight is at the top of many people's to-do lists. But for those with type 2 diabetes, weight control is especially important. “Carrying excess body fat increases the body's resistence to insulin, making blood glucose management more challenging,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, past 2009 national president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association. "According to the World Health Organization, 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese." In fact, research indicates that the longer someone has a high body mass index or BMI (a common measure of being overweight or obese), the greater their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It’s no secret that losing weight — and keeping it off — isn’t easy. But it is possible, and the benefits for those with diabetes are great. So how do you get started? Experts say the right way to lose weight is to incorporate a healthful diet into your overall diabetes management plan. Diabetes Diet Control: Steps to Success Here's how to get started on the path to weight-loss success: Get physical. Exercise can help keep off the weight. “Research shows that people who increase physical activity along with reducing calorie intake will lose more body fat than people who only diet,” says McLaughlin, now a certified diabetes educator at Nebraska Medicine, Children's Hospital and Endocrine Clinics, in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska. For confirmation, look at the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR), a database of 10,000 men and women who have lost a significant amount of weight and kept it off. Only 10 percent reached and maintained their weight-loss goal without exercise. Most people in the register chose walking as their form of exercise. Eat breakfast. The most effective diabetes die Continue reading >>

Why Am I Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes?

Why Am I Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. If you have type 2 diabetes, weight loss can be a good thing. This is assuming the weight loss is part of a balanced approach to your diabetes management, involving sound nutrition and physical activity. Why weight loss is (usually) a good thing Decreased weight is a goal usually associated with type 2 diabetes for many reasons: it helps in lowering blood sugars, decreases your risk of heart disease, and contributes to overall health, to name a few. In fact, a decrease in body weight by as little as five to 10 percent can result in tremendous benefits when talking about blood glucose and health in general. But if you have type 2 diabetes and you’ve had unintentional weight loss, take it as a warning sign, and consult your physician. More on diabetes and weight loss: How Does Losing Weight Help With Type 2 Diabetes? Weight Loss and Diabetes: A Balancing Act There are three worrisome causes of unintentional weight loss for those with type 2 diabetes: 1. Continual high blood sugar With type 2 diabetes, the body is not able to effectively get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells for use in all bodily functions. And if your type 2 diabetes is not managed or controlled, blood sugar gets high very quickly and stays high until something is done about it. If nothing is done to resolve high blood sugar, the glucose that is causing the high blood sugar can’t get into the body’s cells for energy and is excreted in the urine. In other words, if you eat carbohydrates to fuel your body, those carbohydrates that are broken down into glucose aren’t used as fuel, Continue reading >>

One Man's Weight Loss Was A Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

One Man's Weight Loss Was A Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

Kim Palmaffy was diagnosed with diabetes at age 51. (KIM PALMAFFY) If you have type 2 diabetes, you may feel abnormally thirsty and have a need to urinate frequently. One other possibility? You may lose weight without even trying. If it sounds like a weight-loss dream come true, it's actually more of a nightmare. Because your body doesn't have enough insulin or is losing sensitivity to insulin, you can't shuttle blood sugar into muscle cells. Blood sugar rises to toxic levels and you begin to excrete that excess sugar into the urine. At this point some people may shed pounds without dieting. Kim Palmaffy, 61, a contractor in Maplewood, N.J., was close to 300 pounds when he began to show signs of type 2 diabetes ten years ago. At 5'10", he knew he needed to lose weight. And then it started happening all on its own. The pounds started flying off, sometimes up to three pounds a week. "I got down to like 250 pounds over a period of weeks." You may feel exhausted His clothes began to fit better, but Palmaffy was feeling terrible. "I couldn't sleep, I started to urinate all the time, and I was always thirsty." It began to interfere with his work. "I had to get off the roof and take a leak all the time, as dumb as it sounds," he says. A visit to his doctors showed that Palmaffy's blood glucose, the type of sugar the body uses for energy, was a whopping 450 mg/dL, four times what's considered normal on a fasting blood glucose test110 mg/dL. ​​"He started me on a whole battery of medications; I found that the medications were very positive," he said. "We finally settled on Glucotrol (glipizide), five milligrams twice a day." He also takes a cholesterol-lowering drug. Palmaffy had to make some dietary changes to cope with the diagnosis. He found it wasn't that difficult. His Continue reading >>

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Our society is obsessed with weight, if you haven’t noticed. More than two thirds of US adults are overweight or obese, there are more diet books published than we can count, and, of course, we have the privilege of watching shows like The Biggest Loser to help keep us in line. And according to government statistics, more than 85% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. So it stands to reason that much of the focus of managing Type 2 diabetes is based on reaching and staying at a healthy weight. It’s important to note that thin people can get diabetes too, and not just Type 1 diabetes. In a 2008 study published in the journal Diabetes Care, adults age 60 to 79 years old with a body-mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5 (which is considered to be underweight) were 30% more likely to get Type 2 diabetes than adults with a “normal” BMI of 18.5 to 24.9. In a society where being thin equates with beauty, youth, intelligence, and success, there is often little sympathy or patience for people who are too thin and who desperately want to gain weight. If you’ve struggled with losing weight and keeping it off, you know all too well how challenging that can be. People who want to gain weight often face the same kind of battle. And to have diabetes on top of that can make it doubly difficult. First things first: identify the cause If you have diabetes, are underweight, and would like to gain weight, it’s helpful to first have a talk with your doctor. Make sure there are no health or medical reasons for you being underweight (especially if you’ve recently lost weight without trying) such as having an overactive thyroid, a digestive disorder (such as Crohn disease), or cancer, for example. A physical exam, blood work, and other tests may be needed to rule out certai Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Millions of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes could be cured of the disease if they just lost weight, a new study suggests. Scientists at Newcastle University have shown the disease is caused by fat accumulating in the pancreas and losing less than one gram from the organ can reverse the life-limiting illness and restore insulin production. Type 2 diabetes affects 3.3 million people in England and Wales and, until now, was thought to be chronic. It can lead to blindness, stroke, kidney failure and limb amputation. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal” Professor Roy Taylor, Newcastle University But now researchers at Newcastle have shown that the disease can be reversed, even in obese people who have had the condition for a long time. 18 obese people with Type 2 diabetes who were given gastric band surgery and put on a restricted diet for eight weeks were cured of their condition. During the trial the patients, aged between 25 and 65, lost an average of 2.2 stone, which was around 13 per cent of their body weight. Crucially they also lost 0.6 grams of fat from their pancreas, allowing the organ to secrete normal levels of insulin. The team is now planning a larger two year study involving 200 people with Glasgow University to check that the findings can be replicated and weight loss can be sustained for two years. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal,” said Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University who also works within the Newcastle Hospitals. “So if you ask how much weight you need to lose to make your diabetes go away, the answer is one gram. But t Continue reading >>

I Am Trying To Lose Weight. I Have Reduced My Food Intake By 60%. How Much Water Should I Drink Every Day In View Of Reduced Food Intake?

I Am Trying To Lose Weight. I Have Reduced My Food Intake By 60%. How Much Water Should I Drink Every Day In View Of Reduced Food Intake?

All the answers suggested that - One should not reduce the food intake. But should be in calorie deficit mode. Both the above statements are contradictory to each other. I suggested that I am reducing the food intake by 60%. Every body said that food intake should not be reduced but there should be calorie deficit of about 15 to 25%. Crash dieting is bad for health. The answers suggested that I should refer to BMR table, consult nutrition experts or doctors. Most of the people suggested to drink 3 to 6 liters of water on average. No reasons were given for that suggestion. Question was specifically asking about water intake and not food intake. Now allow me to give feedback - I reduced the food intake for about 2 months. On some of the days I did take nuts and some dry fruits. Say about 15 days. Yes there seems to be some damage. I used to get tired. My resting metabolism crashed. My feet and legs started paining by even minimal walking. My feet started paining - which was not the case earlier even if I were to walk for 30 kms non stop. Now it was just less than 1 kms and sole of the feet will pain. I put on weight after I started eating normal. During the period I was eating less there was no weight loss. Today I weight about 2 kg more than my weight when I started. I am still not able to eat my normal food. I feel uneasy even after eating my very normal food. I cannot dream of eating more than normal food. Where earlier I could eat almost 100% more than normal food it I loved the food. It seems that my blood sugar has gone up. Though I have not taken reading. I am sure if I had continued doing this for another 3–4 months I would have been BP patient and diabetic. I feel some extra pressure on my heart as well. Now I am trying my best to reach my normal food intake an Continue reading >>

Diabetes Digest: Medications That Promote Weight Loss In Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Digest: Medications That Promote Weight Loss In Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes epidemic has reached unprecedented scale; about 9% of all Americans (30 million people) have diabetes, and the trend continues to rise. At the same time, it is estimated that 85 million individuals have prediabetes. These are staggering statistics with tremendous cost to patients and society. Ninety five percent of all patients have type 2 diabetes, which is due to excessive body weight, especially abdominal adiposity or fat. Unlike individuals with type 1 diabetes who have full insulin deficiency, type 2 diabetes patients produce plenty of insulin. But due to excess adiposity insulin does not work well and so blood sugars rise. Surprisingly, insulin is one of the main therapies for type 2 diabetes. Yet insulin is a powerful ‘building’ hormone that can cause significant weight gain, an undesirable consequence in someone who is already overweight or obese. In addition, insulin can also trigger unwanted hypoglycemia (low blood sugars) manifestation of which could vary from feeling hungry to becoming unconscious or developing seizures. So it is reasonable for patients to use other medications that promote weight loss rather than weight gain in type 2 diabetes. Such two drug classes are ‘GLP-1 agonists’ and ‘SGLT-2 inhibitors’; which both can cause 5-15 lbs weight loss. Individuals with type 2 diabetes could therefore benefit greatly from these therapies compared to insulin. Metformin is a frequently prescribed medication that can also cause weight loss in certain patients, in addition to being inexpensive and having few adverse effects. Presently there are five FDA approved ‘GLP-1 agonists’; Bydureon, Byetta, Tanzeum, Trulicity and Victoza. These medications have several benefits such as appetite suppression, eating smaller food portions, increasin Continue reading >>

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

At age 14, Erin Williams was tired of medicine. Williams was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic at age 11, and after three years of enduring a never-ending regimen of insulin shots and strict diet restrictions, she was frustrated. Embarrassed by her disease, she kept it a secret from everyone but her closest family and friends. At birthday parties, she made up excuses about why she couldn't have soda or cake. When a classmate saw her drinking juice boxes in the nurses office, she endured weeks of being called the "juice box thief" rather than just tell her classmates she had low blood sugar because of diabetes. Eventually, Williams rebelled the only way she could, she decided not take her insulin. She just didn't want to adhere to the strict diet and medical regimen even though it was vital to her health. "It wasn't this dramatic moment," recalled Williams. "It was mostly like I want to be like everybody else." The next morning when Williams woke up, she felt fine. "Well, nothing bad happened to me," Williams remembered thinking. "It creeps up on you. That's how it does it." Emboldened by her experiment, she continued to restrict her insulin. Without a regimented amount of insulin in her body to process glucose, Williams' body started to burn through fat and muscle. She lost weight very quickly even as she ate all the same foods. Classmates started commenting on her weight loss and remarked that she looked great. "You hear all these things and you're like, 'This is the greatest thing in the world,'" said Williams. "It takes a hold of your life like nothing else." After living with type 1 diabetes for three years, Williams was exhibiting the first signs of a disorder often called diabulimia. The term refers to the dual diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and an eating disorder. Man Continue reading >>

Weight Loss As A Symptom

Weight Loss As A Symptom

As a rule, if you have lost weight and do not know why then see a doctor. A doctor's assessment and tests will usually be able to find the cause. Weight loss is often a matter of choice - we choose to change our diet and exercise habits to become more healthy. If there is a clear and healthy reason then weight loss is normal. However, it is also common to lose weight if you have a serious disease. For most serious diseases, there will usually be one or more other symptoms that develop well before any weight loss. The weight loss in these situations is explained and can often be expected. However, occasionally, the first symptom to develop in some serious diseases is weight loss. Other symptoms usually develop at some point later. Also, some people with weight loss as a first symptom actually have one or more symptoms if they were questioned about them. But, they may not have been aware of the significance of the other symptoms. For example, weight loss is a common symptom of untreated type 2 diabetes. Some people may see a doctor to say that they have lost weight and don't know why. A doctor may then ask if they have been passing more urine than usual (a typical symptom of diabetes). To this question the person may say something like "now you mention it, yes I have. But I had just put that down to my ageing prostate gland and not thought much about it." The rest of this article lists some of the more common conditions where weight loss is sometimes the first symptom noticed by the person, relative or friend. It does not relate to people who are dieting or exercising to lose weight deliberately. The list is not exhaustive. On the Forums 56 years (male, former smoker)- I am 5 feet 5 inches. Generally my body weight varies between 59 to 62 kgs when I am healthy. I have bee Continue reading >>

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

There's no question about it. If you're overweight and have type 2 diabetes, you will lower your blood sugar, improve your health, and feel better if you lose some of your extra pounds. You'll want to work closely with your doctor or diabetes educator, because your blood sugar, insulin, and medications will need special attention while you're losing weight. If you drop even 10 or 15 pounds, that has health perks, such as: Lower blood sugar Lower blood pressure Better cholesterol levels Less stress on your hips, knees, ankles, and feet More energy Brighter mood The Right Balance for Diabetes and Weight Loss Keep tight control over your blood sugar levels while you lose weight. You don't want to get high or low levels while you change your eating habits. It’s generally safe for someone with diabetes to cut 500 calories a day. Trim from protein, carbohydrates, and fat. The USDA says that calories for adults should come from: 45% to 55% carbs 25% to 35% fat 10% to 35% protein Carbs have the biggest effect on blood sugar. Those that have fiber (whole-grain bread and vegetables, for example) are much better than eating sugary or starchy carbs, because they’re less likely to spike your blood sugar and quickly make it crash. How Exercise Helps One of the many benefits of working out is that it helps keep your blood sugar in balance. You're also more likely to keep the pounds off if you're active. If you're not active now, check in with your doctor first. She can let you know if there are any limits on what you can do. Aim to get at least 2.5 hours a week of moderate aerobic exercise, like brisk walking, to improve your health. You can split up the time any way you choose. To help yourself lose weight you’ll need to do more physical activity. You should also do strength tr Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Rapid Weight Loss?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Rapid Weight Loss?

So, I’m going to assume that you’re talking about type 1 diabetes. There are two types of diabetes that are distinctly different metabolic disorders. The answer to your question is the effects of insulin in the body. When type 1’s lose their production of insulin, their bodies no longer are able to store fat or even utilize what blood sugar is being produced by the body. This causes the body to basically consume first fat and then even lean muscle mass. If you look at left hand picture of this type 1 before the discovery of insulin you’ll see the emaciated look of someone starving. The picture on the right shows a more normal body weight after insulin injections were started. So, for type 1’s the lack of insulin can cause rapid weight loss. The lack of insulin causes the body to start basically eating itself. Type 2’s can lose weight if their bodies stop producing insulin; however, for most type 2’s things work in reverse. They have a problem of insulin resistance caused by too much insulin in their system. Too much insulin normally causes the type 2’s to store fat and gain weight. That’s the connection between type 2 diabetes and obesity. Continue reading >>

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