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Do Carrots Make Your Blood Sugar Go Up?

Carrots & Blood Sugar Level

Carrots & Blood Sugar Level

Carrots are a nutritious low-carbohydrate snack. Carrots don't contain a lot of calories per serving, with only 50 calories per cup of raw carrots, but they do provide significant amounts of vitamins and minerals, including potassium and vitamins A, C and K. Since they are also relatively low in carbohydrates and low on the glycemic index, they aren't very likely to cause your blood sugar levels to spike after you eat them. A cup of raw, sliced carrots contains 11.7 grams of carbohydrates, a cup of boiled and drained sliced carrots contains 12.8 grams, and the same amount of canned, sliced carrots contains 8.1 grams. This is a relatively small amount of carbohydrates per serving. For example, diabetics who are counting carbohydrates can typically eat a total of 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal, including three servings consisting of 15 grams of carbohydrates each, making carrots a good option for those watching their carbohydrate intake. The glycemic index measures how much the carbohydrate-containing foods increase your blood sugar levels. Foods that have a low GI of 55 or less are unlikely to cause large increases in your blood sugar levels. Carrots are a low-GI food with a glycemic index of between 16 and 49 depending on how they are prepared. The glycemic load may be an even more accurate way to estimate the effect of a food on blood sugar levels, since it takes into account both the glycemic index of the food and the amount of carbohydrates in each serving of the food. This is important because some foods have a high glycemic index, but the relatively small amount of carbohydrates they contain makes them unlikely to have much of an impact on your blood sugar. The glycemic load is calculated by multiplying the glycemic index by the grams of carbohydrates in Continue reading >>

9 Vegetables That Help Lower Sugar In The Morning

9 Vegetables That Help Lower Sugar In The Morning

9 Vegetables That Help Lower Sugar In The Morning Your blood sugar will be higher on a morning. This is normal for anyone. As you sleep, you fast. Your body needs to create glucose to keep everything running properly. There is nothing to worry about if youre a healthy person and not at risk of diabetes. However, many of us are at risk. Even if we currently have normal blood sugar levels, our diets are putting us at a higher risk of developing Type II diabetes later in life. We want to do as much as we can now to prevent blood sugar levels from becoming a major issue. Those who already have diabetes will also have cause for concern. The blood sugar is naturally much higher on a morning in diabetic patients because the body creates more glucose. Of course, the main way for the body to tackle high blood sugar is through the use of insulin. The body will create more insulin, and soon it becomes used to those levels. You want to lower all the risks. The best way to do that is through eating the right foods. Vegetables are extremely low in sugar, even natural sugars. You want to add these to your diet, especially first thing in a morning. Here are nine that you want to add to your mornings to lower the blood sugar levels at the start of the day. Lets start with broccoli. This is one of the most powerful vegetables for all types of needs, but especially when it comes to blood sugar levels. You can help to lower blood sugar by adding more fiber to your diet. It helps to keep the metabolism working and encourages it to stop metabolizing the sugar as quickly through your system. This is why complex carbs are good for you. The complex carbs like brown pasta and potatoes have fiber as well as sugars. The fiber helps to balance out the sugar levels, making it harder for the sugars Continue reading >>

Best Vegetables For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Vegetables For Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes often feel left out at big family meals and at restaurants, but it should not mean having to avoid delicious food. In fact, no food item is strictly forbidden for people with type 2 diabetes. Healthy eating for people with diabetes is all about moderation and balance. The best vegetables for type 2 diabetes are low on the glycemic index (GI) scale, rich in fiber, or high in blood pressure-lowering nitrates. Why choose vegetables? When considering foods to avoid, many people with diabetes might think about sugary or high-carbohydrate foods, such as cinnamon rolls or bread. Certain vegetables, though, can also cause blood glucose problems. The GI refers to how quickly foods cause blood sugar levels to rise. Foods high on the GI, such as most potatoes, rapidly release glucose, potentially triggering blood glucose spikes. They can also cause weight gain when eaten in excess. Low to moderate GI vegetables, such as carrots, offer better blood glucose control, and a lower risk of weight gain. Nitrates are chemicals that naturally occur in some vegetables. They are also used as preservatives in some foods. Eating nitrate-rich foods, not foods processed with added nitrates, can lower blood pressure, and improve overall circulatory health. This means that nitrate-rich foods, such as beets, are among the best vegetables for people with type 2 diabetes who have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This is still true despite their high level of carbohydrates. The key to good food management, in this instance, is to reduce carbohydrate consumption elsewhere, such as by eliminating bread or sugary snacks. Fiber and protein are both very important in a healthful diabetes diet. Protein is vital for good health, and can help people feel fuller for longer, Continue reading >>

Carrots | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Carrots | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Discussion in ' Prediabetes ' started by darrenjallen , Nov 27, 2017 . Morning. Axsilly question but are carrots bad for us. Just checked the carb level and it's pretty high. As with every type of food the only way of telling whether it affects your BG is to test, eat and test a couple of hours later. Sure, carrots have a high carb level but that depends how much you eat, how much it affects your BG and whether there are any other benefits (such as being able to see in the dark i grate 2 carrots into my salad. the bowel lasts 4 meals. 1 medium carrots around 6 If you have issues with insulin resistance, lots carrots every day would not be a good option. But I would not turn down a salad while eating out just because it contained some carrot. It will.also change on if you eat them.raw or cooked. And its not a silly question. When I was first dx I thought I could eat fruit and porridge. Not being able to eat carrots or onions never even occurred to me. when I look at carbs I too look on my all together level of carbs in a day.. if eating very few carbs , I think it is also a good idea that those carbs you eat are from a healthy food.. so I believe I would say a few carots are okay , just remember to count them into your total number of carbs in a day..actually counting your number of carbs in a day is the most essential ... where is your daily carb levels at is it 100 grams a day or is it 150 grams a day ... or maybe even only less than 50 grams a day ? carots are not fast spiking especially if they are raw .. they also have a lot of fibres which is healthy too together with its very high level of beta-carotine that is fine for eye health .... knowing a Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Foods That Have Little Impact On Blood Sugar

5 Surprising Foods That Have Little Impact On Blood Sugar

What is the most important information I should know about TREMFYA®? TREMFYA® may cause serious side effects, including infections. TREMFYA® is a prescription medicine that may lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections and may increase your risk of infections. Your healthcare provider should check you for infections and tuberculosis (TB) before starting treatment with TREMFYA® and may treat you for TB before you begin treatment with TREMFYA® if you have a history of TB or have active TB. Your healthcare provider should watch you closely for signs and symptoms of TB during and after treatment with TREMFYA®. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have an infection or have symptoms of an infection, including: warm, red, or painful skin or sores on your body different from your psoriasis diarrhea or stomach pain shortness of breath have any of the conditions or symptoms listed in the section “What is the most important information I should know about TREMFYA®?” have recently received or are scheduled to receive an immunization (vaccine). You should avoid receiving live vaccines during treatment with TREMFYA®. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. What are the possible side effects of TREMFYA®? TREMFYA® may cause serious side effects. See “What is the most important information I should know about TREMFYA®?” The most common side effects of TREMFYA® include: upper respiratory infections, headache, injection site reactions, joint pain (arthralgia), diarrhea, stomach flu (gastroenteritis), fungal skin infections, and herpes simplex infections. These are not all the possible side effects of TREMFYA®. Call your doctor f Continue reading >>

Life Extension Magazine

Life Extension Magazine

Although traditional recommendations suggest a diet with 65% of calories supplied by complex carbohydrates, high-carbohydrate diets still increase blood sugar and stimulate insulin production, according to Steven Whiting, PhD. This is likely because complex carbohydrates tend to have a high glycemic load. While the glycemic index indicates how quickly a food raises blood sugar level, the glycemic load is a measure of how much sugar is in a food. Glycemic load is calculated by multiplying the number of grams of carbohydrate in a serving of food by the food’s glycemic index. Some foods such as carrots have a high glycemic index but a low glycemic load. Thus, carrots raise blood sugar quickly, but contain relatively few carbohydrates. Whole grains tend to have a lower glycemic index than white bread, but because they are rich in carbohydrates, they have a high glycemic load. Foods with a higher glycemic load are expected to cause a greater increase in blood glucose over time and thus a greater need for insulin. Long-term consumption of foods with high glycemic loads is associated with an increased risk of type II diabetes and coronary heart disease.34 Thus, both glycemic index and glycemic load are important dietary factors to consider when choosing foods to promote optimal blood sugar. Dr. Gerald Reaven, head of endocrinology, gerontology, and metabolism at Stanford University, says, “Why trade one insulin-raising nutrient for another? It is far safer, and just as nutritious, to decrease carbohydrates and maintain protein at a reasonable level, while increasing your intake of ‘good’ unsaturated fats.”35 If fewer carbohydrates are available, the body will convert protein to glucose. This is a much slower process, so shifting the balance between carbohydrates and Continue reading >>

Can Carrots Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Can Carrots Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Nonstarchy vegetables don't usually cause large increases in blood sugar.Photo Credit: Howard Shooter/Dorling Kindersley RF/Getty Images Carrots are a nutrient-rich vegetable, providing significant amounts of fiber, potassium and vitamins A, C and K. They also contain carbohydrates, making it possible for them to raise your blood sugar levels. Carrots, however, aren't likely to cause large spikes in blood sugar if you eat them in moderation due to their low glycemic index and glycemic load. A cup of raw carrot slices contains 11.7 grams of carbohydrates, and the same amount of cooked carrot slices has 12.8 grams of carbohydrates. This is just a little less than the 15 grams of carbohydrates that make up one serving of carbohydrates for a diabetic. Diabetics usually limit their carbohydrates to 45 to 60 grams per meal to help maintain the proper blood sugar levels. You can use the glycemic index to estimate how a particular food will affect your blood sugar levels. Foods with a score below 55 are considered low on this scale and unlikely to cause spikes in your blood sugar levels. Boiled carrots have a GI between 32 and 49, while raw carrots have a much a much lower score of about 16. The longer you cook foods, the higher the GI is likely to be. The glycemic load takes into account not only the glycemic index of a food but its typical serving size as well, making it an even better indicator of the potential effect of a food on your blood sugar levels. Any score under 10 is considered low; boiled carrots have a glycemic load between 1 and 2, and raw carrots have a score of just 1. This low GL may be partly due to the relatively high fiber content found in carrots, since foods higher in fiber tend to have less of an effect on blood sugar. Whether you cook your carrots, ho Continue reading >>

Carrot Juice For Diabetics

Carrot Juice For Diabetics

The glycemic index, or GI, of a food indicates how quickly and how high a food will raise blood glucose levels. By following a diet rich in low GI foods, such as carrot juice, those with diabetes can work to better manage blood glucose levels. While carrot juice does contain sugar and carbohydrates, because it is a low GI food, it will not cause a rapid rise in blood glucose levels. A diet based on GI can be difficult to follow and, like all diets, may not work for everyone. Glycemic Index When you eat carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into sugars called glucose. The body uses glucose for energy. Different foods contain different types of carbohydrates, which can affect how quickly the food is broken down into glucose and used by the body. The GI measures how much a food raises your blood glucose level. Foods with a high GI are broken down faster and may raise your blood glucose levels more quickly than foods with a low GI. Foods with no carbohydrates, such as fats and meats, have no GI rating. High GI Foods Foods that have a high GI can cause blood sugar levels to spike very quickly after meals. You may even feel energized, but the feeling will not last long. When blood sugar levels are elevated, the body releases insulin to help bring blood glucose levels back down. Because of this, high GI foods may perk you up for a short period, but soon after, you will feel very sluggish and hungry. A GI over 60 is generally considered to be high. Foods with a high GI include sugars, syrups, sodas, white bread, cookies, cakes, potatoes, rice cereal, corn flakes, pineapple, pretzels and ice cream. Low GI Foods Foods with a low GI are used more slowly by the body. These foods are broken down into glucose, and the glucose is used by the body over a longer period. This results Continue reading >>

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

If you have type 2 diabetes — the most common form of diabetes — eating a healthy, well-balanced diet is critical to controlling your weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol. By enriching your diet and creating a meal plan tailored to your personal preferences and lifestyle, you'll be able to enjoy the foods you love while minimizing complications and reducing further risk. Although there isn’t any research that directly supports individual dietary choices in the fight against type 2 diabetes, it doesn’t hurt to maintain a balanced diet. More often than not, the average diet is lacking in these key nutrients: calcium magnesium fiber potassium vitamins A, C, D, and E vitamin B-12 for those on metformin Adding foods rich in these nutrients is often a great first step in diabetes management. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the following are considered to be diabetes superfoods: Fat-free milk and yogurt are both a good source of vitamin D, which promotes strong bones and teeth. Whole grains containing germ and bran are often rich in magnesium, chromium, and folate. Regardless of the type, berries are an excellent source of antioxidants and fiber. Citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, and limes, are high in vitamin C. Not only are beans high in fiber, they’re a solid source of potassium and magnesium. Omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce your risk of heart disease, so don’t shy away from salmon dishes. In addition to providing magnesium and fiber, nuts can help with hunger management. Some nuts and seeds also contain omega-3s. Tomatoes contain crucial nutrients such as vitamins C and E. Swap regular potatoes for sweet potatoes, which are chock-full of potassium and vitamin A. Dark green leafy vegetables like collards and kale a Continue reading >>

Healthy Foods That Do Not Spike Blood Sugar

Healthy Foods That Do Not Spike Blood Sugar

Your blood sugar levels rise when you consume foods with easily accessible carbohydrates, potentially increasing your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity or other health problems. Selecting foods based on their glycemic index, a system that ranks foods based on their potential effect on your blood sugar levels, helps you to find foods that keep your blood sugar levels low; the lower the GI ranking, the less of an impact on your blood sugar levels. Glycemic Index of 20 or Lower Foods without carbohydrates, including meats, eggs and fish, do not have a GI index ranking and do not have a notable impact on your blood sugar levels. Ranked foods with a score of less than 20 also have minimal impact. Such foods include carrots, eggplant, cauliflower, green beans, broccoli, peppers, onions, lettuce, zucchini, tomatoes, peanuts and walnuts. These foods are generally safe for you to eat at each meal without spiking your blood sugar. Cooking raw vegetables makes their carbohydrates more bioavailable and increases their GI ranking -- eat vegetables raw for the smallest impact on your blood sugar. Glycemic Index of 21 to 40 A GI ranking of 21 to 40 represents a small impact on your blood sugar levels. Many vegetables with an otherwise low GI ranking, such as carrots, jump into the 21 to 40 category when cooked. Examples of foods in this small-to-moderate category include peas, beans, lentils, whole wheat pasta, egg noodles, wheat tortillas, pearled barley, rye, cherries, plums, grapefruit, apples, apricots, milk, yogurt and soy milk. Enjoy these foods in moderation to keep your blood sugar in check. Glycemic Index of 41 to 60 Foods with a GI rank of 41 to 60 have a moderate impact on your blood sugar. Examples include rolled oats, kidney beans, chickpeas, popcorn, sweet potatoe Continue reading >>

Foods That Don’t Raise Blood Sugar

Foods That Don’t Raise Blood Sugar

When you know about all the right foods that don’t raise your blood sugar—it can actually become very easy to keep your blood sugars in check. Certain foods will make your blood sugar go up quite rapidly. Also known as high-glycemic foods, these foods include sweets like candy, cakes, muffins, cupcakes, doughnuts, crackers, chips, French fries, pizza dough, wraps, white bread, white pasta, croissants, white rice, sugar, fruit juices like orange juice and apple juice, sweets, cookies, syrup, hamburger buns, rolls, bagels, oatmeal, corn, quinoa, couscous, macaroni and cheese, fettuccini, spaghetti, soda, and honey. You'll want to steer clear of those foods, so that your blood sugar levels stay nice and balanced. Once you add in more foods that don't raise your blood sugar, you won't miss those foods. Here is a list of foods that don't raise blood sugar. This is a list of diabetic-safe foods that are both healthy and delicious. Vegetables Artichoke hearts, Asparagus, Bamboo Shoots, Bean sprouts, Beets, Brussel sprouts, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Cucumber, Eggplant, Greens (collard, kale, mustard, turnip), Hearts of palm, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Mushrooms, Okra (not fried), Onions, Peppers (red, orange, yellow, green), Radishes, Rutabaga, Salad greens, Squash (summer, crookneck, spaghetti, zucchini), Sugar snap peas, Swiss chard, Turnips, and Water chestnuts. Proteins Greek yogurt, Cottage cheese, Eggs, Beef (steak, ground), Pork (chops, loin, ham), Chicken (breast, thigh), Turkey (breast, thigh), Fish (Tuna, halibut, Salmon, tilapia), Shrimp, Canadian bacon, Nuts (peanuts, almonds, cashews), Edamame (soybean), Tofu, and Low-carb protein powders. Fats Avocado, Almonds, Chia seeds, Vegetable Oil, Olive Oil, Flax seeds, Peanut butter (no sugar added), Cocon Continue reading >>

Nature's Best Sugar Blockers

Nature's Best Sugar Blockers

You may have heard that whole grain products are high in fiber. However, the starch in grains quickly turns to sugar and overwhelms any blood sugar-blocking effect the fiber might have. Of course, all fruits and vegetables contain sugar; that's what makes them carbohydrates. Nevertheless, most contain proportionately more soluble fiber than sugar, so they don't raise blood sugar as much as grain products and other refined carbohydrates do. Keeping blood sugar steady is an important tool for preventing insulin spikes, which can lock fat into your cells and prevent it from being used for energy. The substance in our diet that's most responsible for these blood sugar surges is starch. But the good news is you can blunt the blood sugar-raising effects by taking advantage of natural substances in foods—like fiber in fruits and veggies—that slow carbohydrate digestion and entry into the bloodstream. You can tell which fruits and vegetables have the best balance of fiber to sugar by looking at their glycemic loads (Not sure what that means? See Glycemic Impact 101.). All of the carbohydrates that have been associated with increased risk of obesity or diabetes have glycemic loads greater than 100. On the other hand, fruits and vegetables with glycemic loads less than 100 have been associated with reduced risk. Thus, you should avoid fruits or vegetables with glycemic loads higher than 100, even though they contain soluble fiber. Fruits and vegetables whose glycemic loads are between 50 and 100 are themselves acceptable to eat, but they release enough glucose to nullify their usefulness as sugar blockers. The best fruit and vegetable sugar blockers are those with glycemic loads less than 50. It takes about 10 grams of fiber to reduce the after-meal blood sugar surge from a s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Could Carrots Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Could Carrots Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Behind the headlines They say The Express reported in January 2013 that scientists found that carrots are packed with potent health-boosting antioxidants that seem to prevent Type 2 diabetes. We already know that eating a healthy, balanced diet and keeping to a healthy weight are key to reducing the risk of Type 2. However, the new findings shed light on the interaction between our genes and the content of the foods we eat and their impact on our risk of developing this condition. Researchers from Stanford University in California found that, in people with particular common genetic variations, high blood levels of beta carotene, which the body converts to a form of vitamin A, might lower the risk of Type 2 diabetes. They also found that high levels of gamma tocopherol (the major form of vitamin E in the diet, found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and wholegrains), might increase the risk of Type 2. The research, published in the journal Human Genetics, focused on the interactions that occur between the specific genetic variations found in different individuals and blood levels of key substances that have previously been linked to an increased risk of Type 2. On their own, none of the genetic factors showed an impressive impact on Type 2 risk. But when paired with the antioxidants, there were significant results. In people carrying a double dose of a specific variation (in the gene SLC30A4), which is known to increase the risk of Type 2, researchers found clear links between high blood levels of beta carotene and a reduced risk of Type 2. Whereas, the variations combined with high blood levels of gamma tocopherol were linked to an increased risk of the condition. These findings highlight the need for further studies to find out if beta carotene and gamma tocopherol are p Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Evil Carrot

Diabetes And The Evil Carrot

Poor little guy. The moment someone gets high blood sugars they turn their back on him as if he is soley to blame. It's an unusual phenomenon. People come to me for diabetes counseling and often tell me they have been avoiding carrots because they will raise their blood sugar. Well there are lots of things that will raise your blood sugars: bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, cereals, grains, fruits, dairy and sweets. Yet carrots tend to get eliminated before most things time and time again. Let's look at it in numbers: 1 cup of chopped carrot has about 12 grams of carbohydrate (the nutrient in our food that our body breaks down into sugar). Of those 12 grams of carbs, 4g are fibre (fibre is something the body can't turn into sugar) and 6g are sugar. The rest would be starches. An average slice of whole wheat bread has about 12g of carbohydrate. Of those 2 grams are fibre and 2 grams are sugar. The rest would be starches. As I said above, fibre is the one type of carbohydrate we don't break down into sugar. So if we subtract the fibre from both, that would leave 8g of carbohydrates in the cup of carrots and the slice of bread has 10g of carbs. So carrots do not contain tons of sugar. They may contain more than some vegetables but not so much that they cannot be included in your diet. They are a good source of fibre, vitamin A and quite frankly, they are tasty. You don't need to restrict them just because of high blood sugars. If you eat balanced reasonable portions, they can be just as much a part of a healthy diet as everything else. Continue reading >>

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