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Do Artificial Sweeteners Give You Diabetes?

Do Artificial Sweeteners Raise Diabetes Risk?

Do Artificial Sweeteners Raise Diabetes Risk?

"Artificial sweeteners may promote diabetes, claim scientists," reports The Guardian. But before you go clearing your fridge of diet colas, the research in question – extensive as it was – was mainly in mice. The researchers' experiments suggest artificial sweeteners, particularly saccharin, change the bacteria that normally live in the gut and help to digest nutrients. These changes could reduce the body's ability to deal with sugar, leading to glucose intolerance, which can be an early warning sign of type 2 diabetes. Assessments in human volunteers suggested the findings might also apply to people. But human studies so far are limited. The researchers only directly tested the effect of saccharin in an uncontrolled study on just seven healthy adults over the course of a week. It is far too early to claim with any confidence that artificial sweeteners could be contributing to the diabetes "epidemic". In the interim, if you are trying to reduce your sugar intake to control your weight or diabetes, you can always try to do so without using artificial sweeteners. For example, drinking tap water is a far cheaper alternative to diet drinks. Where did the study come from? This study was carried out by researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science and other research centres in Israel. It was funded by the Weizmann Institute and the Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine, as well as grants from various research funders globally. The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Nature. The Guardian covered this study well, avoiding sensationalising the results. The paper and other media outlets, including the Daily Mail, included balanced quotes from various experts that highlight the study's limitations. However, The Guardia Continue reading >>

How Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar And Insulin

How Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar And Insulin

Sugar is a hot topic in nutrition. Cutting back can improve your health and help you lose weight. Replacing sugar with artificial sweeteners is one way to do that. However, some people claim that artificial sweeteners aren't as "metabolically inert" as previously thought. For example, it's been claimed that they can raise blood sugar and insulin levels. This article takes a look at the science behind these claims. Artificial sweeteners are synthetic chemicals that stimulate the sweet taste receptors on the tongue. They are often called low-calorie or non-nutritive sweeteners. Artificial sweeteners give things a sweet taste, without any added calories (1). Therefore, they're often added to foods that are then marketed as "health foods" or diet products. They're found everywhere, from diet soft drinks and desserts, to microwave meals and cakes. You'll even find them in non-food items, such as chewing gum and toothpaste. Here's a list of the most common artificial sweeteners: Artificial sweeteners are synthetic chemicals that make things taste sweet without any extra calories. We have tightly controlled mechanisms to keep our blood sugar levels stable (2, 3, 4). Blood sugar levels increase when we eat foods containing carbohydrates. Potatoes, bread, pasta, cakes and sweets are some foods that are high in carbohydrates. When digested, carbohydrates are broken down into sugar and absorbed into the bloodstream, leading to an increase in blood sugar levels. When our blood sugar levels rise, our body releases insulin. Insulin is a hormone that acts like a key. It allows blood sugar to leave the blood and enter our cells, where it can be used for energy or stored as fat. If blood sugar levels drop too low, our livers release stored sugar to stabilize it. This happens when we fas Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Could Increase Risk Of Diabetes In Just Two Weeks

Artificial Sweeteners Could Increase Risk Of Diabetes In Just Two Weeks

Artificial sweeteners could increase risk of diabetes in just two weeks Millions of people turn to artificial sweeteners instead of sugarCredit:PA Usingartificial sweeteners instead of sugar could increase the risk of diabetes in just two weeks, new research suggests. The study shows that the supplements can change the bodys response to glucose, heightening the risk of the condition which is suffered by almost 4 million Britons. Previous studies have linked high intake of sweeteners to a greater risk of diabetes, The new research, presented at a conference in Lisbon, investigated the mechanisms behind the association. This study, led by the Adelaide Medical School in Australia, involved 27 healthy people who were either given sweeteners - the equivalent of 1.5 litres of diet drink, or an inactive placebo. At the end of two weeks, tests were carried out examining levels of glucose absorption, blood glucose, insulin and gut peptides. The team found that those given supplements such as sucralose - which is commonly marketed as Splenda - saw a heightened response across all fronts. None of these measures were altered in the volunteers who were given a placebo. The study determined that just two weeks of sweeteners was enough to make a difference. Lead author Prof Richard Young said: "This study supports the concept that artificial sweeteners could reduce the body's control of blood sugar levels and highlights the potential for exaggerated post-meal glucose levels in high habitual NAS [non-caloric artificial sweeteners] users, which could predispose them to developing type 2 diabetes." The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Lisbon, Portugal. Sweeteners are employed by many in the battle of the bulgeCredit:P Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners: Any Effect On Blood Sugar?

Artificial Sweeteners: Any Effect On Blood Sugar?

Can I use artificial sweeteners if I have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. You can use most sugar substitutes if you have diabetes, including: Saccharin (Sweet'N Low) Aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal) Acesulfame potassium (Sunett) Sucralose (Splenda) Stevia (Pure Via, Truvia) Artificial sweeteners, also called sugar substitutes, offer the sweetness of sugar without the calories. Artificial sweeteners are many times sweeter than sugar, so it takes a smaller amount to sweeten foods. This is why foods made with artificial sweeteners may have fewer calories than those made with sugar. Sugar substitutes don't affect your blood sugar level. In fact, most artificial sweeteners are considered "free foods" — foods containing less than 20 calories and 5 grams or less of carbohydrates — because they don't count as calories or carbohydrates on a diabetes exchange. Remember, however, other ingredients in foods containing artificial sweeteners can still affect your blood sugar level. More research is needed, but studies are increasingly finding that the benefits of substituting sugar-sweetened food and beverages with those that have been sweetened artificially may not be as clear as once thought, particularly when consumed in large amounts. One reason may be a "rebound" effect, where some people end up consuming more of an unhealthy type of food because of the misperception that because it's sugar-free it's healthy. Also, be cautious with sugar alcohols — including mannitol, sorbitol and xylitol. Sugar alcohols can increase your blood sugar level. And for some people, sugar alcohols may cause diarrhea. Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And Diabetes

Artificial Sweeteners And Diabetes

Is it possible to eat sweets when you have diabetes? The answer is "yes." But when you’re trying to satisfy your sweet tooth, it can be hard to know what to reach for at the grocery store (sugar-free this or low-calorie that). So, use this primer to help you choose wisely. The Sweet Facts When you’re comparing sweeteners, keep these things in mind: Sugars are naturally occurring carbohydrates. These include brown sugar, cane sugar, confectioners’ sugar, fructose, honey, and molasses. They have calories and raise your blood glucose levels (the level of sugar in your blood). Reduced-calorie sweeteners are sugar alcohols. You might know these by names like isomalt, maltitol, mannitol, sorbitol, and xylitol. You'll often find them in sugar-free candy and gum. They have about half the calories of sugars and can raise your blood sugar levels, although not as much as other carbohydrates. Artificial sweeteners are considered "free foods." They were designed in a lab, have no calories, and do not raise your blood sugar levels. Types of Artificial Sweeteners Artificial low-calorie sweeteners include: Saccharin (Sweet'N Low, Sugar Twin). You can use it in both hot and cold foods. Avoid this sweetener if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal). You can use it in both cold and warm foods. It may lose some sweetness at high temperatures. People who have a condition called phenylketonuria should avoid this sweetener. Acesulfame potassium or ace-K (Sweet One, Swiss Sweet, Sunett). You can use it in both cold and hot foods, including in baking and cooking. Sucralose (Splenda). You can use it in hot and cold foods, including in baking and cooking. Processed foods often contain it. Advantame can be used in baked goods, soft drinks and other non-alcoholic bev Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners: Can They Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Artificial Sweeteners: Can They Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Artificial sweeteners are often used as sugar substitutes as they can help "curb your cravings" for something sweet without the health risks real sugars can cause. But medical experts are suspicious of sugar substitutes. "The short answer is we don't know what happens when you replace sugar with artificial sweeteners," Dr. Robert Lustig, endocrinologist and sugar researcher at the University of California, San Francisco, told Time.com. "We have data nibbling around the edges, but we don't have enough to make a hard determination for any specific sweetener," he added. Foods rich in sugar drive insulin resistance. The larger the amount of sugar you take, the more insulin your pancreas produces and releases to keep your blood glucose levels in control. The pancreas may become too overworked and may have difficulty producing enough insulin, and this results in type-2 diabetes. But with artificial sweeteners, the glucose hit doesn't come, and the pancreas searches for blood glucose that will trigger insulin production. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), artificial sweeteners or sugar substitutes are safe according to the standards of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has tested and approved six artificial sweeteners, which include acesulfame potassium, aspartame (Equal), saccharin, sucralose (Splenda), neotame and advantame. These sweeteners are being used to make diet drinks, baked goods, frozen desserts, candy, light yoghurt and chewing gum, ADA said. But according to a 2009 study, people who consume diet soda on a daily basis are 36 percent at risk of developing metabolic syndrome - a condition where people have high blood pressure and too much abdominal fat - and are 67 percent more likely to develop type-2 diabetes than people who d Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Associated With Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity

Artificial Sweeteners Associated With Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity

Artificial sweeteners could be linked with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, obesity and heart disease, according to a new review. The evidence has been published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, which revealed that sweeteners, while designed to aid weight loss, could actually have negative effects on metabolism, appetite and gut bacteria. However, the authors from the University of Manitoba stressed that there aren't enough long-term studies on this data and, consequently, more research is needed to prove whether this association is valid. To better understand how artificial or non-nutritive sweeteners affected health markers, scientists compared studies among adults and adolescents, studying BMI, weight and obesity, among other end points. No consistent effect was observed regarding weight loss, and in some studies sweeteners were actually associated with weight gain, increased waist circumference and higher rates of obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes and heart events. "Evidence […] does not clearly support the intended benefits of nonnutritive sweeteners for weight management, and observational data suggest that routine intake of non-nutritive sweeteners may be associated with increased BMI and cardiometabolic risk," said the researchers. The study team believes the findings call into question the benefits of artificial sweeteners for weight management, especially as so few long-term studies exist regarding their effects. "Caution is warranted until the long-term health effects of artificial sweeteners are fully characterised," said lead author Dr. Meghan Azad. "Given the widespread and increasing use of artificial sweeteners, and the current epidemic of obesity and related diseases, more research is needed to determine the long-term risks and b Continue reading >>

How Natural & Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar

How Natural & Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar

I have wanted to write a post about sweeteners for a while now. Mainly because I get a little frustrated when reading or hearing outright incorrect claims about how some of the natural and artificial sweeteners affect your blood sugar. As a person with diabetes, I want to know exactly what will happen to my blood sugar when I eat or drink something, and I don’t take kindly to half-true marketing claims. I’ve decided to focus on how natural & artificial sweeteners impact blood sugar rather than on whether they are healthy or not, since I think that is somewhat out of my domain and because plenty of others have already covered that. What are natural & artificial sweeteners? FDA defines sweeteners as: “…commonly used as sugar substitutes or sugar alternatives because they are many times sweeter than sugar but contribute only a few or no calories when added to foods”. This means that regular sugar, honey, and Agave nectar/syrup don’t fall into the sweetener category. However, I do want to address these shortly before moving on to the real artificial sweeteners, since I’ve seen claims of how honey and agave won’t impact blood sugar in the same way as sugar. Honey and agave nectar Let’s start with honey because, let’s face it, it’s sugar in liquid form. It’s delicious, but an October 2015 study in the Journal of Nutrition found that when subjects were given honey, cane sugar, or high-fructose corn syrup, they saw no notable difference in blood sugar increase. As for agave, I think that the corporate marketing machine has been very clever when declaring this a health food, for as Dr. Jonny Bowden points out“..It’s basically high-fructose corn syrup masquerading as healthy food.” Agave nectar may have a lower glycemic index than sugar or honey, but Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Sweeteners

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Sweeteners

Artificial sweeteners are always a “hot topic” and many people tend to have strong feelings about them, one way or another. It seems like every other month we get a report on the latest study on what artificial sweeteners do or don’t do to us. The data alternates between saying artificial sweeteners are good for us or they are going to kill us – so which is it? It can be hard to know what to believe and what to do, especially if you have diabetes and see artificial sweeteners as a healthy alternative. They seem like a great option for lowering calories and carbohydrates, but are they too good to be true? Let’s look at some of the claims, myths and facts related to artificial sweeteners. We’ll start with the basics. The Background and the Basics Artificial sweeteners, also called sugar substitutes, were originally created to help people lose weight and manage diabetes. They were thought to be a great alternative. Saccharin was the first artificial sweetener, accidentally discovered by scientists at John’s Hopkins. Eventually there were concerns over the safety of saccharin based on studies done in rodents. Even though the FDA was leaning toward banning it, but they didn’t, and it was partially because of consumer uproar over that possibility. The final ruling was that saccharin was only required to have a warning label about cancer, but could remain on the market. In 2000, the warning label was removed because they could only prove its carcinogenic affect in rodents and not in humans. You will still find saccharin “the pink packet” on the market today. Now, we have a total of 8 sugar substitutes. There are two different kinds, nutritive and non-nutritive. Nutritive means it adds to the caloric value of food and it contains more than 2% of the amount o Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners

Artificial Sweeteners

Artificial sweeteners do not raise blood sugar levels. When used instead of sugar, artificial sweeteners help you keep within your carbohydrate goals when planning meals. Artificial sweeteners, or non-nutritive sweeteners offer the sweet taste of sugar, but have no carbohydrates or calories. Artificial sweeteners do not raise blood sugar levels. So when used instead of sugar, artificial sweeteners can help you keep within your carbohydrate goals when planning meals. And because artificial sweeteners have no calories, choosing foods made with artificial sweeteners may lower your calorie intake. Look for manufactured foods and sweeteners for the table that contain one of these 5 sugar substitutes approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration: Saccharin (Brand Name: Sweet and Low, Sugar Twin) Aspartame loses sweetness when cooked. Sucralose, acesulfame-K and saccharin can be used for baking. Look for special baking recipes for artificial sweeteners, as direct substitution for sugar might not give you the result you want. Or, try a combination of artificial sweetener and sugar in recipes to get your desired result while lowering the overall carbohydrate amount. Keep in mind that some artificial sweeteners can be sweeter than equal amounts of natural sugar. A little bit goes a long way. This naturally sweet herb has been used in other countries for centuries. It is not FDA approved for use as a sweetener, but it can be purchased as a dietary supplement in many health food stores. Stevia comes in powder, liquid and tablet form. It doesnt provide calories or impact blood glucose. The FDA has completed careful testing of all the artificial sweeteners. Artificial sweeteners have been shown to be safe to eat. Despite rumors of cancer causing effects of artificial sw Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Raise Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Suggests

Artificial Sweeteners Raise Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Suggests

Artificial sweeteners, which many people with weight issues use as a substitute for sugar, may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to research. The study was small and the detailed results have not yet been published, but experts said its findings fitted with previous research showing an association between artificial sweeteners and weight gain. Type 2 diabetes is linked to obesity and rates of the disease are soaring around the world. Its complications, if it is not controlled, can include blindness, heart attacks and strokes. The study was carried out by researchers at the University of Adelaide, in Australia, who wanted to investigate whether large amounts of no-calorie artificial sweeteners altered the ability of the body to control the levels of glucose in the blood. Some of the 27 healthy volunteers who were recruited for the study were given the equivalent of 1.5 litres of diet drink a day, in the form of capsules of two different sweeteners, sucralose and acesulfame K. They took the capsules three times a day for two weeks, before meals. The others in the study were given a placebo. Tests at the end of the two weeks showed that the body’s response to glucose was impaired. “This study supports the concept that artificial sweeteners could reduce the body’s control of blood sugar levels and highlights the potential for exaggerated post-meal glucose levels in high habitual NAS [non-caloric artificial sweeteners] users, which could predispose them to develop type 2 diabetes,” said the authors. They presented their findings at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Lisbon, Portugal. Some experts said the findings were in line with previous research, while others said they did not support the conclusion that sweeteners coul Continue reading >>

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 6 A Small Amount of Real Sugar Is Best, but Sugar Substitutes Can Help If you think that people with diabetes should always avoid sugar, think again — they can enjoy the sweet stuff, in moderation. "The best bet is to use a very minimal amount of real sugar as part of a balanced diabetic diet," says Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, of Nutritious Life, a nutrition practice based in New York City. That being said, sugar substitutes offer sweetness while controlling carbohydrate intake and blood glucose. There are many sugar substitutes to choose from, but they’re not all calorie-free and they vary in terms of their impact on blood sugar. "The major difference between the sugar substitutes is whether they are nutritive or non-nutritive sweeteners," says Melissa Mullins, MS, RD, a certified diabetes educator with Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, Va. "Non-nutritive sweeteners provide no calories and no changes in blood glucose levels, which is perfect for people with diabetes.” Here are six sweet options to consider. Continue reading >>

Ask The Doctor: Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Insulin Resistance?

Ask The Doctor: Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Insulin Resistance?

Ask the doctor Q. I've heard that artificial sweeteners increase the risk of developing insulin resistance. Is that true? Are some types worse than others? A. You've asked a question scientists are still working to answer. Studies of artificial sweeteners are mixed, with some indicating that people using them eat fewer calories and lose weight or maintain a stable weight. However, in a few studies, artificial sweeteners were associated with weight gain, which might increase the risk of developing insulin resistance—a condition in which body cells do not respond properly to insulin and thus cannot easily absorb glucose from the blood-stream. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Could Artificial Sweeteners Raise Diabetes Risk?

Could Artificial Sweeteners Raise Diabetes Risk?

Could Artificial Sweeteners Raise Diabetes Risk? Small study suggests these products might somehow inhibit blood sugar control THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A small Australian study suggests that consuming high amounts of artificial sweeteners might affect how the body responds to sugar -- and might raise a person's risk of diabetes . "This study supports the concept that artificial sweeteners could reduce the body's control of blood sugar levels ," said lead author Richard Young, an associate professor at the University of Adelaide's medical school. High sweetener intake might lead to "exaggerated" spikes in people's blood sugar levels after a meal, he explained, which over time "could predispose them to developing type 2 diabetes ." He spoke in a news release from the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Lisbon, Portugal, where the findings were to be presented on Wednesday. The study was small -- just 27 people -- and lasted just two weeks, so more research would be needed. However, the findings bring up interesting questions, said one U.S. diabetes specialist. Dr. Roubert Courgi is an endocrinologist at Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y. Reading over the Australian research, he noted that it "proved glucose [blood sugar] response is hampered" in heavy users of artificial sweeteners. "This study reaffirms that artificial sweeteners can still affect your body's response to glucose," he said. In the study, 27 healthy people were randomly picked to consume capsules containing either artificial sweeteners -- either sucralose or acesulfame-K -- or a "dummy" placebo. The capsules were taken three times a day before meals for two weeks. The total dose included in a day's worth of sweetener capsules was equal to drinking Continue reading >>

New Study Shows Artificial Sweeteners Can Lead To Diabetes

New Study Shows Artificial Sweeteners Can Lead To Diabetes

Over 3 Million Acres Damaged by Chemical Arson as Plants Wither and Die From Chemical Burns Researchers at the University of Adelaide in Australia revealed that artificial sweeteners impair the bodys response to glucose, reducing control of blood sugar levels It took just two weeks for the artificial sweetener group to show adverse effects to their blood sugar levels, including a reduction in numbers of the gut peptide GLP-1, which limits the rise in blood sugar after eating While public health agencies continue to support the use of artificial sweeteners, one Yale University cardiologist, and ex-diet soda fiend, is speaking out against them The American Diabetes Association states foods and drinks that use artificial sweeteners are an option that "may help curb your cravings for something sweet" if you have diabetes. They're among a number of public health organizations spreading the deceptive and incorrect message that artificial sweeteners make a sensible alternative to sugar for diabetics even as the research continues to accumulate to the contrary. In a small, preliminary study presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Lisbon, Portugal, researchers at the University of Adelaide in Australia revealed that artificial sweeteners impair the body's response to glucose, reducing control of blood sugar levels . 1 , 2 The study involved 27 healthy participants who were given either capsules of the artificial sweeteners sucralose (brand name Splenda) and acesulfame K in an amount equivalent to consuming 1.5 liters of diet drinks a day or a placebo. It took just two weeks for the artificial sweetener group to show adverse effects to their blood sugar levels, including a reduction in numbers of the gut peptide GLP-1, which limits the rise in blood su Continue reading >>

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